A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1898 – December 31, 1898

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January 1, 1898: Viktor Josef Ullmann is born at Berggasse 18 in Teschen, Silesia, Austro-Hungarian Empire (Cesky Tesin, Czech Republic), the son of Maximilian Georg Ullmann, an Austrian army officer, and Malwine Marie Billitzer.
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January 1, 1898: The second inquest into Major Esterhazy concludes that there is not enough evidence for a court martial. However, General Saussier, the military governor of Paris, calls for one in order to clear Esterhazy’s name.
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January 1, 1898: The boroughs of Brooklyn and Manhattan are joined to form greater New York.
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January 1, 1898: Cuba is granted limited autonomy by Spain.
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January 4, 1898: The Deutsche Zeitung of Vienna publishes an article called “Die Judenherrschaft in der Wiener Oper.” It is a furious attack on director Gustav Mahler (37).
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January 7, 1898: Sadko, an opera by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (53) to words of Belsky, Stasov, Yastrebtsev, Shtrup, Findeyzen, and the composer, is performed for the first time, in the Solodovnikov Theatre, Moscow.
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January 7, 1898: La mort de Tintagiles op.6 for two violas d’amore and orchestra by Charles Martin Loeffler (36) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston. The composer plays one solo part.
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January 8, 1898: The Comitato Pro-Scala meets for the first time to try to reorganize and reopen Teatro alla Scala, Milan. They create a private corporation to run the theatre and appoint Duke Guido Visconti di Modrone to head it.
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January 8, 1898: The Finnish Senate is informed that Tsar Nikolay II has agreed to a stipend for Jean Sibelius (32) which the Senate requested.
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January 11, 1898: After a two day secret court martial, Major Esterhazy is acquitted of forging documents in the Dreyfus case. The whistle blower in French Intelligence, Lieutenant Colonel Georges Picquart, is indicted for revealing secret documents to civilians and is placed under arrest.
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January 12, 1898: Marquis Hirobumi Ito replaces Prince Masayoshi Matsukata as Prime Minister of Japan.
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January 12, 1898: Spanish conservatives riot in Havana to oppose the liberal reforms of Prime Minister Sagasta. The US consul-general tells his government that he needs protection.
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January 13, 1898: Lidové noviny informs its readers that a committee has been established in Brno to organize a Czech orchestra which will feature Czech composers. It is to be led by Leos Janácek (43).
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January 13, 1898: “J’accuse!”, an open letter to the President of the French Republic by Emile Zola, is printed in L’Aurore. Zola accuses an official whitewash in the Dreyfus affair. The French Chamber of Deputies votes to bring Zola to trial.
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January 14, 1898: Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) dies in Guildford, Surrey at the age of 65.
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January 15, 1898: The Governor General of Cuba, Ramón Blanco y Ereñas, marqués de Peña Plata, places a guard around the US consulate in Havana to protect it from nationalists.
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January 19, 1898: Raymonda, a ballet by Alyeksandr Glazunov (32), is performed for the first time, in the Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg.
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January 21, 1898: The three handwriting experts who exonerated Major Esterhazy and were named in the letter “J’accuse” bring suit against Emile Zola for libel.
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January 22, 1898: The third session of the Australasian Federal Convention opens in Melbourne to complete the proposed national constitution.
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January 22, 1898: Andante op.75 for violin and piano by Gabriel Fauré (52) is performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris.
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January 24, 1898: After a slight remission in his mental collapse, Hugo Wolf (37) is discharged from the asylum of Dr. Wilhelm Svetlin in Vienna.
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January 24, 1898: Worried that the situation in Cuba might get out of hand, the US sends the USS Maine to Havana to safeguard US interests.
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January 24, 1898: Göttin der Vernunft op.476, a quadrille by Johann Strauss (72), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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January 25, 1898: USS Maine arrives in Havana, ordered to protect US interests.
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January 26, 1898: A new Russian circle holds its first meeting in Brno. Among those chosen for the committee is Leos Janácek (43).
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January 27, 1898: Song for the Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám op.40 for solo voice and piano or orchestra by Arthur Foote (44) is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to the accompaniment of a piano.
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January 28, 1898: Maurice Ravel (22) enters the composition class of Gabriel Fauré (52).
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January 31, 1898: With a multi-national crew including Roald Amundsen and Frederick Cook, men from the Belgica, commanded by Adrien De Gerlache, make the first encampment on Antarctica. On the same day, the first sledge journey formally begins the exploration of the continent.
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January 31, 1898: Alyeksandr Skryabin (26) and his new wife Vera, give a joint all-Skryabin recital in the Salle Erard, Paris. Included on the program is the premiere of the Polonaise in b flat minor op.21 and the Impromptu op.12/2.
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January 31, 1898: Piano Quintet op.38 by Arthur Foote (44) is performed for the first time, in Boston, the composer at the keyboard.
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February 1, 1898: The Travelers Insurance Company of Hartford, Connecticut issues the first automobile insurance policy. It was bought by Dr. Truman J. Martin of Buffalo, New York.
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February 1, 1898: During the run of Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov’s (53) opera Sadko, the Solodovnikov Theatre in Moscow, burns to the ground.
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February 3, 1898: Three works by Carl Nielsen (32) are performed for the first time, in the Koncertpalæet, Copenhagen: String Quartet no.1, Six Songs op.10 to words of Holstein, and Humoresque-Bagatelles op.11 for piano. For the quartet it is the first public performance. Two of the songs have been performed already.
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February 5, 1898: Two Brown Eyes, a song for voice and piano by Gustav Holst (23), is performed for the first time, in Hammersmith, London.
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February 7, 1898: The trial of Emile Zola begins at the Palace of Justice, Paris.
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February 7, 1898: United States forces occupy San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua.
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February 8, 1898: United States forces end their occupation of San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua.
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February 9, 1898: The New York Journal publishes a letter from Spanish minister to the United States Enrico Dupuy de Lome which criticizes US President William McKinley. The minister resigned yesterday.
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February 10, 1898: Victor Herbert (39) is named conductor of the Pittsburgh Orchestra. He will be informed tomorrow.
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February 12, 1898: Johannes Wilhelm Christian Steen replaces Francis Hagerup as Prime Minister of Norway.
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February 12, 1898: The Princess op.68, a cycle for vocal quartet and piano by Charles Villiers Stanford (45) to words of Tennyson, is performed for the first time, at the Northern Polytechnic Institute in London.
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February 12, 1898: Philine, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (37) to words of Goethe, is performed for the first time, in Bösendorfersaal, Vienna.
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February 12, 1898: LeRoy Ellsworth (Roy) Harris is born in a log cabin near Chandler, Oklahoma Territory, USA the third of five children born to Elmer Ellsworth Harris, a farmer, and Laura Broddle. Only three of the five children survive infancy.
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February 15, 1898: The battleship USS Maine blows up in Havana harbor. 266 people are killed.
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February 19, 1898: At a rehearsal for the Vienna premiere of Ruggero Leoncavallo’s (40) La bohème, the composer, and conductor Gustav Mahler (37) battle in front of musicians and cast about the inclusion of the singer Ernest Van Dyck. Receiving no satisfaction, Leoncavallo withdraws but later sends a letter to the hall threatening to withdraw his work if Van Dyck is not included. Mahler does not give in. Leoncavallo takes his cause to the press.
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February 20, 1898: Swiss voters approve the nationalization of the country’s railroads.
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February 20, 1898: US President McKinley creates a board of inquiry to discover the cause of the destruction of USS Maine.
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February 23, 1898: Emile Zola is convicted of libel for his open letter “J’acccuse”. He is given the maximum sentence, one year in jail and a fine of 3,000 francs. During the trial, certain facts go on the public record which will allow for a retrial of Alfred Dreyfus.
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February 23, 1898: The Austrian premiere of Ruggero Leoncavallo’s La bohème takes place in Vienna conducted by Gustav Mahler (37). Although there are demonstrations by supporters of the two men, the evening goes off without major incident and Leoncavallo pronounces himself pleased with the result.
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February 24, 1898: Incidental music to Paul’s play Kung Kristian II by Jean Sibelius (32) is performed for the first time, in the Swedish Theatre, Helsinki.
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February 26, 1898: Lieutenant Colonel Georges Picquart, the whistle blower in French Intelligence in the Dreyfus affair, is dismissed from the French Army.
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March 1, 1898: Russian Marxists meet secretly in Minsk and found the Russian Social Democratic Labor Party.
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March 1, 1898: Manuel de Ferraz de Campos Sales wins the second presidential election in Brazil
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March 5, 1898: Franz, Count Thun und Hohenstein replaces Paul, Baron Gautsch von Frankenthurn as Chancellor of Austria.
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March 5, 1898: Sites auriculaires for two pianos by Maurice Ravel (22) is performed for the first time, in the Salle Pleyel, Paris. It is Ravel’s debut as a composer.  The critics are unkind.
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March 6, 1898: China grants a lease of Kiaochow (Jiaozhou) to Germany for 99 years.
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March 6, 1898: After visits to various resorts, Hugo Wolf (37) returns to a new home in the Mühlgasse, Vienna.
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March 6, 1898: Spring Song for voice and piano by Leos Janácek (43) to words of Tichy is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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March 8, 1898: Don Quixote, a tone poem for cello and orchestra by Richard Strauss (33), is performed for the first time, in Cologne. The reaction of the audience is mixed. Critics think it too experimental.
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March 9, 1898: Granville Bantock (29) marries Helena von Schweitzer, daughter of a German aristocrat.
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March 9, 1898: Hymne op.34/2 for chorus by Richard Strauss (33) to words of Rückert is performed in an open rehearsal in Cologne. See 18 April 1898.
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March 11, 1898: The US military begins to mobilize, without orders from President McKinley.
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March 13, 1898: Soir de fète, a symphonic poem by Ernest Chausson (43), is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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March 13, 1898: Lemercier-Picard, who actually forged the letter of 31 October 1896, is found hanging in his hotel bedroom. How he got there is not known.
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March 13, 1898: Drei Gedichte von Michelangelo for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (tr. Robert-tornow) are performed for the first time, in the Festsaal der Liederhalle, Stuttgart on the composer's 38th birthday.
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March 17, 1898: The third session of the Australasian Federal Convention closes in Melbourne, having adopted a national constitution.
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March 17, 1898: A String Quartet in D by Arnold Schoenberg (23) is performed for the first time, by the Tonkünstlerverein, privately, in Vienna. See 20 December 1898.
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March 19, 1898: Promenade galante op.5/1 for voice and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (30) to words of Banville is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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March 20, 1898: The Wild Dove, a symphonic poem by Antonín Dvorák (56), is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by Leos Janácek (43). On the same program, the epilogue to Amarus, a cantata by Leos Janácek to words of Vrchlicky, is performed for the first time. See 2 December 1900.
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March 25, 1898: Arnold Schoenberg (23) is baptized into the Protestant Dorotheer Community in Vienna.  He receives the name Arnold Walter Franz Schoenberg.
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March 26, 1898: The Reichstag approves a major expansion of the German navy with the First Navy Bill introduced by Navy Minister Alfred von Tirpitz.
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March 27, 1898: China cedes Liaotung (Liaodong) Peninsula and Port Arthur (Lüshun) to Russia for 25 years and grants a concession for a South Manchurian Railway.
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March 27, 1898: US President William McKinley demands that Spain institute an armistice with Cuban rebels.
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March 27, 1898: Pietro Mascagni (34) conducts a symphonic concert for the first time in an important house, at La Scala, Milan. His conducting ability is warmly received.
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March 28, 1898: A Spanish board of inquiry blames an internal explosion for the destruction of the USS Maine.
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March 28, 1898: An American board of inquiry into the destruction of the USS Maine presents its findings to Congress. It can not determine the cause of the explosion but does not believe that it originated inside the ship.
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March 29, 1898: The United States issues an ultimatum to Spain to leave Cuba.
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March 29, 1898: Resolutions on war against Spain and recognizing Cuba’s independence are introduced in the US Congress.
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March 30, 1898: The French government approves plans for a five line metropolitan transit system for Paris, covering 65 km.
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March 31, 1898: The government of Spain agrees to submit the USS Maine case to arbitration but demands that Cuban rebels ask for an armistice.
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April 1, 1898: Spain rejects the United States ultimatum of 29 March.
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April 2, 1898: The Court of Appeals overturns the 23 February verdict against Emile Zola. They order a new trial.
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April 2, 1898: Quartet for piano and strings op.30 by Ernest Chausson (43) is performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris. The premiere is very successful.
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April 2, 1898: Three Compositions for violin and piano op.40 by Amy Cheney Beach (30) are performed for the first time, in Boston.
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April 3, 1898: On the first anniversary of his death, the Johannes Brahms Monument Committee issues an appeal that a Brahms monument be built in Vienna.
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April 4, 1898: The New York Journal prints 1,000,000 copies of an issue devoted to war against Spain.
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April 5, 1898: US President McKinley recalls all American consuls from Cuba.
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April 7, 1898: Three of the Quattro pezzi sacri by Giuseppe Verdi (84) are performed for the first time, in Paris: Laudi alla Vergine Maria for female voices to words of Dante, Te Deum for double chorus and orchestra, and Stabat mater for chorus and orchestra. It is one of the few times that Verdi is not present for the premiere of one of his works. He has been ordered by his doctor to stay home.
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April 8, 1898: British and Egyptian forces rout Sudanese at the Atbara River.
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April 8, 1898: At a musical evening in the home of Mily Balakirev (61), the host and Sergey Mikhailovich Lyapunov play through a two-piano version of his “new” symphony to several invited guests, including Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (54), Vladimir Stassov, and Alyeksandr Glazunov (32). At the conclusion there is silence. Only with difficulty do the guests find anything positive to say, and Rimsky never does. See 23 April 1898.
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April 9, 1898: Spain informs the United States that it will declare a truce with Cuban revolutionaries, submit the Maine issue to international arbitration, and grant other US demands.
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April 9, 1898: Richard Strauss (33) concludes a one-year contract with the Berlin opera to begin 1 November.  It will be signed on 15 April.
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April 10, 1898: Voting in presidential elections in Argentina returns Julio Roca to power.
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April 11, 1898: US President William McKinley asks Congress for the authority to use force in Cuba.
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April 15, 1898: The Legend of St. Christopher op.43, a dramatic oratorio by Horatio Parker (34) to words of his mother, Isabella Parker, is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 15, 1898: Richard Strauss (33) signs a contract to conduct the Berlin Court Opera.
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April 16, 1898: Sicilienne op.78 for cello and piano by Gabriel Fauré (52) is performed for the first time.
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April 18, 1898: Menuet antique for piano by Maurice Ravel (23) is performed for the first time, in the Salle Erard, Paris.
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April 18, 1898: Hymne op.34/2 for chorus by Richard Strauss (33) to words of Rückert is performed for the first time, in Cologne. See 9 March 1898.
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April 20, 1898: Both houses of the US Congress approve a joint resolution demanding the independence of Cuba and authorizing force against Spain. Part of the resolution denies that the United States has any interest in controlling or occupying Cuba.  President McKinley signs and forwards the joint resolution of Congress to Spain.
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April 21, 1898: Spain responds to the ultimatum as a declaration of war. The Spanish minister in Washington asks for his passport and the entire legation departs the city for Canada.  The United States minister in Madrid receives his passport.
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April 22, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States warships depart Key West to begin a blockade of Cuba. The first shots in the war are fired by USS Nashville as it captures the Spanish ship Buenaventura off Cuba.
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April 22, 1898: Two songs for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (38) are performed for the first time, in the Altes Rathaus, Vienna:  Mir ward gesagt, du reisest in die Ferne (first public) to anonymous words (tr. Heyse), and Ach, des Knaben Augen sind to words of López de Ubeda (tr. Heyse).
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April 23, 1898: Symphony in C by Mily Balakirev (61) is performed for the first time, at the Free School of Music, St. Petersburg conducted by the composer. It is his last appearance as conductor.
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April 24, 1898: Spain declares war on the United States.
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April 24, 1898: Festive Chorus for dedicating the banner of the St. Joseph’s Union, for male voices by Leos Janácek (43) to words of Stasny is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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April 25, 1898: Russia and Japan agree to the independence of Korea and non-interference in its internal affairs.
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April 25, 1898: The United States Congress recognizes the independence of Cuba and declares that war with Spain has existed since 21 April.
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April 27, 1898: Three works for chorus and orchestra by Alphons Diepenbrock (35), to words of van den Vondel, are performed for the first time, in Haarlem: Choral Song of the Poor Clares for female chorus, Choral Song of the Amsterdam Virgins for female chorus, and Choral Song of the Noblemen for chorus.
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April 28, 1898: Herr, was trägt der Boden hier, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (38) to anonymous words (tr. Heyse), is performed publicly for the first time, in the Konzertsaal der Liederhalle, Stuttgart.
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April 30, 1898: Two works by Gabriel Fauré (52) are performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris: Dolly op.56 for piano-four hands, and Arpège op.76/2 for voice and piano to words of Samain. See 6 December 1906 and 9 January 1913.
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April 30, 1898: Chansons de Shakespeare for voice and piano by Ernest Chausson (43) to words translated by Boucher is performed for the first time.
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April 30, 1898: Several works for voice and piano by Alphons Diepenbrock (35) are performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam: Die Liebende schreibt to words of Goethe, Ave Maria, Canticum “O Jesu ego amo te” words of Francis Xavier, Hinüber wall’ ich to words of Novalis, Écoutez la chanson bien douce to words of Verlaine, I am No Longer Alone in Solitude to words of Thijm, and Lied der Spinnerin to words of Brentano.
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May 1, 1898: While crossing cable car tracks at 72nd Street and Columbus Avenue, New York, Victor Herbert (39) is thrown from his bicycle and suffers a broken nose.
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May 1, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States warships annihilate a Spanish squadron in Manila Bay, the Philippines. 167 people are killed, all of them Spanish. All of the Spanish ships are sunk.
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May 2, 1898: Der Abend op.34/1 for chorus by Richard Strauss (33) to words of Schiller is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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May 3, 1898: Two Madrigals for chorus by Albert Roussel (29) are performed for the first time, in the Salle Pleyel, Paris conducted by the composer.
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May 5, 1898: The John Philip Sousa (43) band escorts Troop A of the Ohio National Guard as it departs Cleveland for the war against Spain.
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May 7, 1898: Edward Elgar (40) conducts the first concert of the Worcestershire Philharmonic. He will hold this post until 1904.
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May 8, 1898: Bread riots over the last five days in Milan are put down by the Italian military with hundreds killed.
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May 12, 1898: Spanish-American War: US warships bombard San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Spanish return fire. Not much damage is done.
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May 13, 1898: Thomas Edison files suit against American Mutoscope and Biograph Pictures for patent infringement on his Kinetograph movie camera.
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May 14, 1898: Liebestraum for piano or organ WoO III/7 by Max Reger (25) is performed for the first time, in Wiesbaden.
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May 14, 1898: During a revival of Jules Massenet’s (56) La Navarraise at the Paris Opéra-Comique, when the Spanish soldiers enter carrying the Spanish flag, the crowd bursts into applause.
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May 18, 1898: Two new works by Camille Saint-Saëns (62) are performed for the first time, in Paris: Duo for two pianos op.8bis and Barcarolle op.108 for violin, cello, harmonium, and piano, the composer at the harmonium.
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May 19, 1898: Spanish-American War: Emilio Aguinaldo arrives in Manila from exile in Hong Kong. The United States invites him to return in hopes that he will foment rebellion against the Spanish rulers of the islands.
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May 22, 1898: A second round of voting in the French national election leaves the Progressive Republicans with the most seats. Moderate leftists hold the majority of seats.
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May 23, 1898: Ernest Judet publishes “Zola père et fils” in his Petit Journal. It defames Emile Zola’s father.
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May 24, 1898: Emilio Aguinaldo institutes a dictatorial revolutionary government in the Philippines to deal with the chaos he found upon his return.
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May 24, 1898: One day after Japanese troops evacuate Wei-hai-wei (Weihai), British troops move in to take over the lease agreed to by China.
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May 24, 1898: Emile Zola sues Ernest Judet for libel.
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May 24, 1898: Fantasio, a phantastiche Komödie by Ethel Smyth (40) to words of Brewster and the composer after de Musset, is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Hoftheater.
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May 24, 1898: Spanish-American War: 12,000 US troops board ship in San Francisco and sail for the Philippines.
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May 27, 1898: China grants 500 sq km on the shores of Kwangchow Bay to France.
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May 28, 1898: The Beauty Stone, a romantic musical drama by Arthur Sullivan (56) to words of Pinero and Carr is performed for the first time, in the Savoy Theatre, London. The critics are not impressed.
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May 28, 1898: St. Nepomuks Vorabend, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (38) to words of Goethe, is performed for the first time, in the Hotel du Nord, Schwerin.
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May 30, 1898: Searching for an inert gas lighter than Argon, British chemists William Ramsay and Morris Travers instead discover one that is heavier, at University College, London. They call in Krypton.
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May 31, 1898: Klänge aus der Raimundzeit op.479, a fantaisie by Johann Strauss (72), is performed for the first time, in the Deutsches Volkstheater, Vienna.
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June 1, 1898: Song of Welcome op.42 for chorus and orchestra by Amy Cheney Beach (30) is performed for the first time, in Omaha, Nebraska for the opening of the Trans-Mississippi Exposition.
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June 1, 1898: Spanish-American War: The first US ground troops arrive in the Philippines at Cavite.
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June 5, 1898: Gustav Mahler (38) takes a leave of absence from the Vienna Opera to undergo surgery at the Rudolphinerhaus clinic in Döbling to address his frequent hemorrhoids.
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June 7, 1898: Caprice Héroïque for two pianos by Camille Saint-Saëns (62) is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg before the Russian royal family.
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June 9, 1898: China grants Great Britain a 99-year lease over the New Territories in Hong Kong.
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June 10, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States Marines land at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and establish a beachhead.
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June 12, 1898: Emilio Aguinaldo proclaims the independence of the Philippines. A provisional government is formed.
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June 12, 1898: Young Emperor Kuang-hsü (Guangxu) of China decrees the Hundred Days of Reform. Over the next three months, he will issue edicts designed to transform China into a constitutional monarchy.
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June 13, 1898: British chemists William Ramsay and Morris Travers inform the Royal Society that they have discovered a new gas which they call Neon.
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June 13, 1898: The Yukon District is separated from the Northwest Territories and made a separate territory.
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June 13, 1898: Spanish-American War: US troops begin landing in the Philippines.
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June 14, 1898: An agreement between Great Britain and France, signed in Paris, defines the borders and spheres of influence around the Niger River.
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June 15, 1898: The American Anti-Imperialist League is founded to oppose annexation of the Philippines. Among its members are Andrew Carnegie, Mark Twain, William James, and Samuel Gompers.
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June 15, 1898: The annexation of Hawaii is approved by the US House of Representatives 209-91.
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June 15, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States troops repulse a Spanish attack on their beachhead at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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June 16, 1898: Voting for the tenth Reichstag of the German Empire results in losses for the Conservative Party while the Center Party and the Social Democrats post gains.
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June 16, 1898: Spanish-American War: US warships destroy the Spanish fort of Cayo Toro near Caimanera, Cuba.
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June 17, 1898: German ships arrive in Manila looking for concessions.
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June 19, 1898: The second version of The Jacobin, an opera by Antonín Dvorák (56) to words of Cervinkova-Riegrova, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Prague.
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June 19, 1898: A Giacomo Leopardi, a cantata for voice and orchestra by Pietro Mascagni (34) to words of Leopardi, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Persiani, Recanati, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the poet’s birth.
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June 21, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States forces capture Guam from Spain without fighting. The Spanish government on the island is unaware that war has been declared.
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June 21, 1898: Incidental music to Maeterlinck’s (tr. by Mackail) play Pelléas et Mélisande by Gabriel Fauré (53) is performed for the first time, in the Prince of Wales Theatre, London, conducted by the composer. The music includes an orchestration of the Sicilienne op.78 for cello and piano. This production is very successful, both with the audience and critics. See 16 April 1898.
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June 22, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States forces land at Daiquiri, Cuba, 25 km from Santiago.
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June 24, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States forces defeat Spanish at Las Guásimas, Cuba.
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June 26, 1898: The first Bergen Music Festival opens in the Norwegian city. Edvard Grieg (55) has managed to convince the organizers to invite the Concertgebouw Orchestra. Their performances help to prove Grieg’s contention that a first class orchestra is necessary in Norway.
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June 27, 1898: Eugène Henri Brisson replaces Félix Jules Méline as Prime Minister of France.
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June 28, 1898: Auf’s Korn op.478, a Bundesschützen-Marsch for chorus and orchestra by Johann Strauss (72), is performed for the first time, in the Prater, Vienna.
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June 29, 1898: Luigi Pelloux replaces Antonio Di Rudini, Marquis of Starabba as Prime Minister of Italy.
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June 29, 1898: 700 students receive degrees at the commencement exercises at Yale University. Among them is Charles Ives (23).
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June 30, 1898: Shigenobu Okuma replaces Marquis Hirobumi Ito as Prime Minister of Japan.
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July 1, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States forces capture El Caney and San Juan Hill, Cuba. They also take Aquadores Fort at Santiago de Cuba. Both sides lose over 1,000 total casualties.
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July 3, 1898: Canadian Joshua Slocum reaches Fairhaven, Massachusetts aboard his eleven-meter sloop Spray. He has become the first human to circumnavigate the globe alone. It took him three years, two months, and two days.
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July 3, 1898: Spanish-American War: As the Spanish fleet attempts to leave Santiago de Cuba it is destroyed by United States naval forces. 354 people are killed, one of them an American.
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July 4, 1898: The French liner SS La Bourgogne collides with the British iron sailing vessel Cromartyshire in fog and sinks in 40 minutes near Sable Island. About 550 people are lost, including three members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 173, mostly crew, survive.
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July 4, 1898: Spanish-American War: The United States takes possession of Wake Island.
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July 6, 1898: The annexation of Hawaii is approved by the US Senate 42-21.
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July 6, 1898: Hanns Eisler is born at Hoffmeisterstraße 14 in Leipzig, in the German Empire, the last of three children born to Rudolf Eisler, a philosopher, and Marie Ida Fischer, daughter of a butcher.
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July 7, 1898: French Minister of War Godefroy Cavaignac presents to the National Assembly documents he says proves the guilt of Alfred Dreyfus. Among them are the forged letter of 31 October 1896. For this he is denounced by socialist leader Jean Jaurès and former head of French Intelligence Lieutenant Colonel Georges Picquart.
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July 7, 1898: US President McKinley signs the resolution annexing Hawaii, arguing “we must have Hawaii to help us get our share of China.”
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July 7, 1898: Spanish-American War: US forces capture Isla Grande, at the entrance to Subic Bay, without serious Spanish resistance.
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July 9, 1898: In his retrial on libel charges, Emile Zola is convicted for a second time. He is given a suspended prison sentence of two weeks and ordered to pay 2,000 francs fine and 5,000 francs to each of the three handwriting experts he libeled.
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July 10, 1898: 22 French soldiers along with 200 West African natives, after marching for two years from the French Congo, take possession of an old Egyptian fort at Fashoda (Kodok, South Sudan) on the Nile, nominally British territory.
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July 12, 1898: Working at University College, London, British chemists William Ramsay and Morris Travers find a new substance in liquid air. They call it Xenon. It is the third element discovered by the pair in less than two months.
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July 13, 1898: Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (50) is knighted by Queen Victoria at Windsor Castle.
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July 13, 1898: Former head of French Intelligence Lieutenant Colonel Georges Picquart is arrested on charges brought by French Minister of War Godefroy Cavaignac that he divulged military documents to a civilian, his lawyer Louis Leblois.
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July 14, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) addresses a letter to 160 composers advocating a change in the Imperial German copyright laws in order to better protect composers. He will receive 119 positive responses.
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July 17, 1898: Spanish-American War: Spanish defenders of Santiago de Cuba surrender to United States forces.
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July 18, 1898: A paper written by Marie and Pierre Curie is read at the French Academy of Sciences. They inform the Academy that they have discovered a new substance which they call Polonium. They also use the word “radioactive” for the first time.
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July 18, 1898: Spanish-American War: US warships bombard the harbor of Manzanillo, Cuba. They destroy six Spanish warships and damage three others.
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July 19, 1898: On the advice of his lawyers, Emile Zola flees France after his trial for libel.
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July 25, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States forces invade Puerto Rico at Guánica, 25 km west of Ponce. They capture the town.
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July 26, 1898: Emile Zola is suspended from the Legion of Honor.
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July 26, 1898: Spanish-American War: At the request of Spain, the government of France contacts United States authorities about a cessation of hostilities.
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July 28, 1898: Two works by Gabriel Fauré (53) for flute and piano are performed for the first time, at the Paris Conservatoire: Fantaisie op.79 and Morceau de lecture.
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July 28, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States land and naval forces capture Ponce, Puerto Rico. The Spanish defenders run away. The American commander promises the inhabitants liberation from Spain. Local citizens respond happily.
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July 30, 1898: Otto von Bismarck dies in Friedrichsruh, near Hamburg, at the age of 83.
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July 30, 1898: Spanish-American War: A counter-proposal for cease-fire is relayed from the United States to Spain through France.
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July 31, 1898: Spanish-American War: A Spanish counterattack at Malate, near Manila, is repulsed by United States troops.
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August 2, 1898: Spanish-American War: Spain accepts the counter-proposal of the United States for cease-fire with certain reservations.
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August 3, 1898: Ernest Judet and his Petit Journal are convicted of libeling Emile Zola.
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August 3, 1898: Spanish-American War: A new landing of US troops on Puerto Rico occurs at Arroyo.
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August 9, 1898: Spanish-American War: United States troops defeat Spanish at Coamo, Puerto Rico.

The Spanish government accepts peace terms offered by the US.

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August 10, 1898: The Court of Appeals rejects the appeal of Emile Zola’s conviction and makes the sentence more harsh: one month in jail, a fine of 2,000 francs, and 10,000 francs to each of the three handwriting experts libeled.
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August 12, 1898: Sovereignty over the Hawaiian Islands is officially transferred to the United States.
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August 12, 1898: Spanish-American War: US naval forces begin a bombardment of Manzanillo, Cuba, supported by Cuban insurgents on land.

On the same day that United States forces complete their conquest of Puerto Rico, an armistice is concluded between Spain and the United States and signed in Washington.

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August 13, 1898: United States and Philippine troops enter Manila.
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August 13, 1898: An opponent of Alfred Dreyfus, Captain Cuignet, while perusing the Dreyfus file in French Intelligence, discovers that some of the documents have been forged, including the infamous letter of 31 October 1896. He accuses Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Joseph Henry of committing the forgery.
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August 16, 1898: Working from photographic plates taken last year by DeLisle Stewart in Peru, American astronomer William Henry Pickering discovers Phoebe, a moon of Saturn. It is the first time a satellite is discovered by photographs.
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August 16, 1898: Edwin Prescott of Arlington, Massachusetts receives a US patent for a roller coaster.
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August 20, 1898: Maurice Ravel (23) is hired as a pianist at the casino in Granville on the coast of Normandy.
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August 23, 1898: Tsar Nikolay II appoints Major General Nikolay Bobrikov as Governor-General of Finland.
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August 27, 1898: Major Ferdinand Walsin-Esterhazy is dismissed from the French army for “habitual misconduct.”
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August 28, 1898: In his pharmacy in New Bern, North Carolina, Caleb Bradham invents the recipe for what he calls “Brad’s Drink.” It will one day be known as Pepsi Cola.
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August 28, 1898: Incidental music to Gallet’s play Déjanire by Camille Saint-Saëns (62) is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre des Arènes, Béziers. It is very enthusiastically received.
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August 29, 1898: The Goodyear Tire Company is incorporated in Ohio.
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August 29, 1898: The Charlatan, an operetta by John Philip Sousa (43) to words of Klein, is performed for the first time, at the Academy of Music, Montreal.
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August 30, 1898: French Chief of Intelligence Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Joseph Henry admits to forging a document in the Dreyfus case and is imprisoned.
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August 31, 1898: Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands reaches her 18th birthday and begins to rule in her own right.
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August 31, 1898: French Chief of Intelligence Lieutenant Colonel Hubert Joseph Henry, admitted forger of documents in the Dreyfus case, kills himself in prison by slashing his throat with a razor. Major Ferdinand Walsin-Esterhazy flees France to Belgium on his way to England.
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September 2, 1898: British and Egyptian troops under General Kitchener defeat the Mahdists at Omdurman. Over 15,000 are killed.
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September 2, 1898: Great Britain and Germany agree not to interfere with or compete with each other in China.
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September 3, 1898: JB Marchand, leader of the French forces at Fashoda, signs a treaty with the local ruler which effectively establishes a French protectorate over the Upper Nile.
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September 3, 1898: French Minister of War Godefroy Cavaignac resigns over revelations in the Dreyfus affair. Lucie Dreyfus petitions the Chamber of Deputies for a second time, asking for a retrial of her husband.
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September 5, 1898: General Émile Zurlinden, the military governor of Paris, is named French Minister of War.
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September 6, 1898: A Turkish mob attacks a small number of British troops at the customs house, hospital, and army encampment at Candia (Heraklion), Crete. Turkish authorities, rather than keep order, carry out a massacre of about 1,000 Greeks. British warships open fire. 14 British are killed in the incident.
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September 9, 1898: Stephane Mallarmé dies at Valvins, near Fontainebleau, at the age of 56.
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September 10, 1898: Elizabeth, Empress of Austria, is stabbed to death by an Italian anarchist in Geneva. This will delay Gustav Mahler's (38) new production of Der Ring des Nibelungen at the Vienna Hofoper for ten days.
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September 12, 1898: The joint US-Spain commission to oversee the Spanish military withdrawal in Cuba, meets in Havana.
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September 13, 1898: The Spanish Cortes ratifies the Protocol of Peace with the United States.
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September 13, 1898: Hannibal Goodwin of Newark, New Jersey is granted a US patent for celluloid film eleven years after he applied for it.
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September 14, 1898: The Fortune Teller, an operetta by Victor Herbert (39) to words of Smith, is performed for the first time, in the Grand Opera House, Toronto. See 26 September 1898.
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September 15, 1898: The Congress of the First Philippine Republic meets in Barasoain Church in Malolos, province of Bulacan, to write a constitution.
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September 15, 1898: A Song of Darkness and Light for soprano, chorus, and orchestra by Hubert Parry (50) to words of Bridges is performed for the first time, in Gloucester.
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September 17, 1898: French Minister of War General Émile Zurlinden refuses a request for a retrial of Alfred Dreyfus and then resigns. However, he is placed in his former post, military governor of Paris.
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September 17, 1898: Rêverie op.24 for orchestra by Alyeksandr Skryabin (26) is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg, conducted by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (54).
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September 18, 1898: Moslem residents of the Cretan town of Candia (Heraklion) kill the British vice-consul by burning down his house. They then proceed to kill every Christian they can find. Within two months, all Turkish troops will be withdrawn from Crete, at the insistence of the great powers.
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September 19, 1898: British forces pushing up the Nile from Omdurman reach Fashoda and are astounded to find it occupied by French troops. A standoff ensues while both sides request instructions from their capitals.
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September 19, 1898: The Dowager Empress Tzu-hsi (Cixi) returns to the Forbidden City and places Emperor Kuang-hsü (Guangxu) under arrest.
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September 20, 1898: General Zurlinden, the military governor of Paris, orders an inquiry into the whistle blower in the Dreyfus case, Lieutenant Colonel Georges Picquart.
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September 20, 1898: Fantasy on Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott op.27 for organ by Max Reger (25) is performed for the first time, in the Wilibrordi-Dom, Wesel.
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September 21, 1898: The Dowager Empress Tzu-hsi (Cixi) seizes power in China, turning back the reforms of her predecessor.
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September 23, 1898: Hans Richter submits his resignation as director of the Vienna Philharmonic, officially because of medical reasons. The same day, the orchestra board asks Gustav Mahler (38) to take over. In fact, it has all been arranged in advance.
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September 24, 1898: The board of the Vienna Philharmonic formally names Gustav Mahler Conductor of the Philharmonic Concerts by acclamation.
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September 26, 1898: French Prime Minister Henri Brisson refers the Dreyfus case to the Court of Cassation, requesting a new trial.
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September 26, 1898: One day after he completes the first uncut performance of Der Ring des Nibelungen in Vienna, a committee from the Vienna Philharmonic calls on Gustav Mahler (38) and offers him the directorship of their orchestra. He accepts gladly.
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September 26, 1898: The Fortune Teller, an operetta by Victor Herbert (39) to words of Smith, is performed for the first time in New York, at Wallack’s Theatre. It is wildly successful. See 14 September 1898.
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September 26, 1898: Jacob Gershvin (George Gershwin) is born at 242 Snediker Avenue in Brooklyn, New York, USA, second of four children born to Russian immigrants Morris Gershvin (Moshe Gershovitz) presently a leather worker, and Rose Bruskin, daughter of a furrier.
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September 30, 1898: Sonata for violin and piano no.2 op.36a by Ferruccio Busoni (32) is performed for the first time, at the Musikinstitut, Helsinki.
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September 30, 1898: As a result of the letter of Richard Strauss (34) last 14 July, a conference takes place in Leipzig which creates the Genossenschaft deutscher Tonsetzter.
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October 1, 1898: Spanish and United States commissioners meet for the first time in Paris to conclude a peace treaty.
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October 2, 1898: A hurricane makes landfall at Cumberland Island, Georgia. 179 people are killed.
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October 4, 1898: After attempting to drown himself in the Traunsee, Hugo Wolf (38) enters the Lower Austrian provincial asylum in Vienna, his care provided for by the Hugo Wolf Verein.
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October 5, 1898: Caractacus, a cantata by Edward Elgar (41) to words of Acworth, is performed for the first time, in Leeds, conducted by the composer. The audience gives overwhelming support, the press is “polite” but mixed. Afterwards, Elgar first makes the acquaintance of Hubert Parry (50). Gabriel Fauré (53) and Charles Villiers Stanford (46) are also in the audience.
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October 5, 1898: Ernst Bloch (18) enters the orchestra of Eugene Ysaÿe in Brussels as a violinist. At today’s first rehearsal he is so nervous that he puts soap on his bow so that no one will hear the mistakes. Eventually, Bloch will become acquainted with many members of the Ysaÿe circle, including Claude Debussy (36), Camille Saint-Saëns (62), and Gabriel Fauré (53).
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October 6, 1898: Te Deum op.66 for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Charles Villiers Stanford (46) is performed for the first time, in Leeds.
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October 7, 1898: Maurische Rhapsodie for orchestra by Engelbert Humperdinck (44) is performed for the first time in Leeds, conducted by the composer.
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October 8, 1898: Arthur Sullivan (56) conducts the Leeds Festival for the last time.
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October 11, 1898: Since Emile Zola has fled France, his belongings are seized to pay his fine. At a public auction, the editor Eugène Fasquelle buys the first item, a desk, for 32,000 francs, the total amount of the fine. This closes the auction.
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October 12, 1898: When management tries to use scabs, striking United Mine Workers riot at Virden, Illinois. 13 people are killed, 25 wounded.
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October 14, 1898: The British SS Mohegan strikes ground off Porthoustock, Cornwall and goes down within twelve minutes. 106 people are lost, 44 rescued.
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October 18, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) conducts Fidelio, his last production as chief conductor of the Munich Opera. He is moving to Berlin.
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October 22, 1898: Four songs from The Mountain Maid op.67, a cycle for voice and piano by Edvard Grieg (56) to words of Garborg, are performed for the first time, in Christiania (Oslo). See 4 February 1899.
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October 25, 1898: Anti-Semitic demonstrations take place in Paris.
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October 27, 1898: Theodor Herzl arrives in Jerusalem leading a Jewish delegation.
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October 28, 1898: Danza aragonesa, the second of the Deux danses caractéristiques for piano by Enrique Granados (31), is performed for the first time, in Barcelona.
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October 29, 1898: Construction is completed on the Secession Building in Vienna, designed by Joseph Maria Olbrich.
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October 31, 1898: Charles Alexandre Dupuy, dit Charles-Dupuy replaces Eugène Henri Brisson as Prime Minister of France.
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November 1, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) enters duties as conductor of the Berlin Hofoper (first Kapellmeister to the Court of Prussia).
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November 3, 1898: General Kitchener orders French forces to withdraw from Fashoda.
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November 3, 1898: Two movements of a Piano Quartet by Béla Bartók (17) are performed for the first time, in Pozsony.
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November 3, 1898: Victor Herbert (39) gives his first concert as conductor of the Pittsburgh Orchestra. He is welcomed warmly by the public and the press.
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November 4, 1898: French forces evacuate Fashoda in the face of a British force before them.
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November 5, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) conducts for the first time at the Berlin Court Opera. It is Wagner’s (†15) Tristan und Isolde.
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November 6, 1898: Gustav Mahler (38) conducts his first performance with the Vienna Philharmonic, a program of Beethoven (†71) and Mozart (†106). At first lukewarm, the audience is very pleased by the end.
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November 6, 1898: Jules Massenet (56) conducts an all-Massenet program at the Concerts Colonne in the Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris.
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November 8, 1898: Prince Aritomo Yamagata replaces Shigenobu Okuma as Prime Minister of Japan.
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November 8, 1898: Nicola Tesla receives a patent for a “method of and apparatus for controlling mechanism of moving vessels or vehicles.” It is the first remote control.
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November 10, 1898: Whites riot against blacks in Wilmington, North Carolina, burning down a black-owned newspaper and killing between 20 and 100 blacks.
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November 12, 1898: The Kunsttempel of the Secession is inaugurated in Vienna, along with the second exhibition of that artistic group.
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November 12, 1898: Maria del Carmen, a zarzuela by Enrique Granados (31) to words of Feliu y Codina, is performed for the first time, in Teatro de Parish, Madrid. The music receives a good response, the words are panned. It is Granados’ first significant success.
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November 14, 1898: Edward Elgar’s (41) Festival March in C is performed for the first time, in the Crystal Palace.
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November 14, 1898: The Prelude to Act I of Isaac Albéniz’ (38) unfinished opera Merlin is performed for the first time, in Barcelona, conducted by Vincent d’Indy (47).
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November 14, 1898: Was soll der Zorn, mein Schatz, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (38) to anonymous words (tr. Heyse), is performed for the first time, in Bösendorfersaal, Vienna.
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November 15, 1898: Manuel Ferraz de Campos Salles replaces Prudente José de Moraes Barrios as President of Brazil.
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November 17, 1898: Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? by Paul Gauguin is exhibited at the Galerie Ambroise Vollard, Paris. Gauguin painted it last year in Tahiti.
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November 17, 1898: WS Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan (56) are called on the stage of the Savoy after a performance celebrating the 21st anniversary of The Sorcerer, their first full length collaboration. The two will never see each other again.
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November 17, 1898: Fedora, an opera by Umberto Giordano (31) to words of Colautti after Sardou, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Lirico, Milan.  The tenor, one Enrico Caruso, becomes world famous with this performance.
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November 18, 1898: The trial of Lieutenant Georges Picquart begins in Paris.
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November 19, 1898: The Anti-Imperialist League is founded in Boston to oppose US acquisition of overseas territories. Among their members are former Presidents Cleveland and Harrison.
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November 19, 1898: Hymne an den Gesang for male chorus and orchestra op.21 by Max Reger (25) is performed for the first time, in Weiden, the composer conducting.
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November 22, 1898: Iris, a melodramma by Pietro Mascagni (34) to words of Illica, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Costanzi, Rome, the composer conducting before a glittering audience which includes Queen Margerita and many aristocrats, Gabriele d’Annunzio, Giacomo Puccini (39), Arrigo Boito (56), and Siegfried Wagner. It is a popular but not critical success. Puccini feels that Mascagni did the best he could with a poor libretto. The rehearsals were a shambles, with the original conductor, Edoardo Mascheroni, storming out and sending off an indignant letter to the press.
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November 25, 1898: Antonín Dvorák (57) receives the honorary insignia “Litteris et artibus” from Emperor Franz Joseph II.
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November 26, 1898: Prince George of Greece is appointed high commissioner for Crete following a Turkish withdrawal.
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November 26, 1898: On a run from Boston to Portland, the SS Portland goes down in a gale off Cape Ann taking all 192 aboard with her.
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November 27, 1898: The instrumental version of Auf’s Korn op.478, a Bundesschützen-Marsch by Johann Strauss (72), is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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November 29, 1898: The Malolos Congress approves a constitution for the First Philippine Republic.
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December 1, 1898: The Perfect Wagnerite by George Bernard Shaw is published.
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December 1, 1898: Song of My Heart op.18/6 for male chorus by Jean Sibelius (32) is performed for the first time, in Helsinki.
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December 2, 1898: Claire de lune for voice and piano by Alphons Diepenbrock (36) to words of Verlaine, is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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December 4, 1898: Heroic Song, a tone poem by Antonín Dvorák (57), is performed for the first time, in Vienna conducted by Gustav Mahler (38).
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December 4, 1898: Rat einer Alten, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (38) to words of Mörike, is performed for the first time, in the Konzertsaal der Liederhalle, Stuttgart.
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December 5, 1898: An orchestral suite from the incidental music to Kung Kristian II by Jean Sibelius (32) is performed for the first time, in Helsinki.
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December 7, 1898: Mozart and Salieri, an opera by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (54) to words of Pushkin, is performed for the first time, in the Solodovnikov Theatre, Moscow.
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December 7, 1898: A gala performance takes place to inaugurate the third Salle Favart in Paris. It was built to replace the second Salle Favart which burned down in 1887.
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December 8, 1898: Béla Bartók (17) and his mother travel to Vienna Conservatory where he is promised a free place for next academic year. He will change his mind, however, in favor of the Budapest Academy of Music.
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December 9, 1898: A Piano Concerto by Cesar Cui (63) is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg, Alyeksandr Skryabin (26) at the keyboard.
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December 10, 1898: A peace treaty between Spain and the United States is signed in Paris. Spain is forced to cede Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines, and is forced to recognize the independence of Cuba. The United States pays Spain $20,000,000 for all Spanish claims in the Philippines.
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December 14, 1898: Wreaths for Our Graves, an anthem by Arthur Sullivan (56), is performed for the first time, at the Royal Mausoleum at Frogmore, for the 27th anniversary of the death of Prince Albert.  It was composed by royal command.
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December 17, 1898: The second setting of Der Abendhimmel for male chorus by Anton Bruckner (†2) to words of Zedlitz, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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December 17, 1898: Erhebung for chorus by Hugo Wolf (38) to words of Eichendorff, is performed for the first time, in the Kleiner Musikvereinssaal, Vienna.
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December 18, 1898: The Dowager Empress of China decrees that no more railway projects by Europeans will be entertained.
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December 19, 1898: Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov’s (54) drastic rewriting of Boris Godunov by Modest Musorgsky (†17) is performed publicly for the first time, in Moscow. See 10 December 1896.
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December 20, 1898: A String Quartet in D by Arnold Schoenberg (24) is performed publicly for the first time, in the Bösendorfersaal, Vienna. See 17 March 1898.
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December 26, 1898: Marie and Pierre Curie inform the French Academy of Sciences that they have discovered a new substance which they call radium.
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December 26, 1898: After missing the Carnival season last year, Teatro alla Scala opens under new management.
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December 27, 1898: The Noblewoman Vera Sheloga, an opera by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (54) to his own words after Mey, is performed for the first time, in Moscow.