A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1892 – December 31, 1892

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January 1, 1892: The Ellis Island Immgration Station opens to process immigrants to the United States.
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January 1, 1892: Two Little Caprices from op.27 for piano by Arthur Foote (38) are performed for the first time, in Boston by the composer.
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January 1, 1892: Ritter Pásmán, a comic opera by Johann Strauss (66) to words of Dóczi after Aranyi, is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Hofoper. The audience receives it warmly but the critics are negative.
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January 3, 1892: Two works for cello and piano by Antonín Dvorák (50) are performed for the first time, in Rakovnik: Silent Woods and Rondo in g minor.
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January 5, 1892: The Cuban Revolutionary Party is founded in New York by José Julián Martí y Pérez. Its goal is to achieve independence for Cuba from Spain.
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January 7, 1892: An explosion in a coal mine in Krebs, Oklahoma Territory leaves 100 dead and 150 injured. Most of the miners are recent immigrants from Russia and Italy.
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January 8, 1892: A Slavonic Dance for cello and piano op.46/8 by Antonín Dvorák (50) is performed for the first time, in Chrudim.
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January 16, 1892: Three songs for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (31) are performed for the first time, in Bösendorfersaal Vienna:  Geh, Geliebter, geh Jetzt! to anonymous words (tr. Geibel), Sie blasen zum Abmarsch to anonymous words (tr. Heyse), and Weint nicht, ihr Äuglein! to words of Lope de Vega (tr. Heyse).
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January 17, 1892: Richard Strauss (27) conducts Tristan und Isolde for the first time, in Weimar.
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January 17, 1892: Rapsodie bretonne op.7bis for orchestra by Camille Saint-Saëns (56) is performed for the first time, at the Cirque des Champs-Elysées (Cirque d'été), Paris.
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January 18, 1892: José Dias Ferreira replaces João Crisóstomo de Abreu e Sousa as Prime Minister of Portugal.
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January 19, 1892: Gustav Mahler (31) conducts a performance of Yevgeny Onegin by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (51) in Hamburg before an audience which includes the composer. Tchaikovsky writes to his nephew, “The conductor here is not the usual ilk, but a man of genius who would give his life to conduct the premiere.”
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January 20, 1892: The first public basketball game takes place in Springfield, Massachusetts. It was invented by a YMCA worker named James Naismith.
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January 22, 1892: String Quartet no.1 op.44 by Charles Villiers Stanford (39) is performed for the first time, in Newcastle upon Tyne.
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January 23, 1892: The Polyeucte Overture by Paul Dukas (26) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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January 24, 1892: Protestants defeat Catholics in battle at Mengo in Buganda (Uganda) with the assistance of a Maxim gun.
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January 25, 1892: On the day that US President Harrison suggests to Congress that a declaration of war is appropriate over the USS Baltimore incident, the Chilean government agrees to pay reparations.
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January 25, 1892: Incidental music to Bouchor’s play La légende de Sainte-Cécile by Ernest Chausson (37) is performed for the first time, in the Petit Théâtre des Marionettes, Paris.
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January 26, 1892: The Royal English Opera House of Richard D’Oyly Carte is forced to close due to dwindling receipts after only one year of operation.
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January 28, 1892: The Libera me from the second version of Gabriel Fauré’s (46) setting of the Requiem is performed for the first time, in the church of Saint-Gervais, Paris. See 16 January 1888, 21 January 1893, and 12 July 1900.
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January 29, 1892: A Pastoral Prelude for orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (37) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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February 1, 1892: The gold standard is adopted by Austria-Hungary.
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February 5, 1892: March of the Björneborgers for small orchestra by Jean Sibelius (26) is performed for the first time, in Helsinki. See 4 July 1900.
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February 7, 1892: A Mass in E flat for chorus and orchestra op. 5 by Amy Beach (24) is performed for the first time, in the Boston Music Hall. Public and critics are enthralled.
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February 11, 1892: Two new chamber works by Sergey Rakhmaninov (18) are performed for the first time, as part of his first concert not at the conservatory, in Vostriakov Hall, Moscow: Trio élégiaque no.1 for piano and strings, and Prelude for cello and piano op.2/1.
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February 14, 1892: Parts of La Nuit Persane by Camille Saint-Saëns (56) to words of Renaud, a version for solo voices and orchestra of his 1870 song cycle Mélodies Persanes, are performed for the first time, in Paris.
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February 15, 1892: Voting for the Japanese House of Representatives results in victory for liberal parties.
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February 16, 1892: Werther, a drame lyrique by Jules Massenet (49) to words of Blau, Milliet, and Hartman after Goethe, is performed for the first time, at the Vienna Hofoper. This is a German translation by Kalbeck. See 27 December 1892.
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February 20, 1892: Lady Windermere’s Fan by Oscar Wilde is first performed at the St. James Theatre, London.
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February 21, 1892: Le carillon, a légende mimée et dansée by Jules Massenet (49) to a story by van Dyck and de Roddaz, is performed for the first time, at the Burgtheater, Vienna.
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February 21, 1892: Mala vita, an opera by Umberto Giordano (24) to words of Daspuro after Di Giacomo is performed for the first time, in Teatro Argentina, Rome.
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February 22, 1892: Unparteiische Kritiken op.442, a polka mazurka by Johann Strauss (66), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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February 23, 1892: Johannes Wilhelm Christian Steen replaces Emil Stang as Prime Minister of Norway.
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February 23, 1892: Responding to a request from Charles Villiers Stanford (39) that Johannes Brahms (58) allow Cambridge University to confer an honorary doctorate on him in June 1893, Brahms sends his “thanks but no thanks.” At that season, he would rather be “walking beside some lovely Italian lake.” He suggests that Stanford should do the same.
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February 24, 1892: Incidental music to Aristophanes’ play The Frogs by Hubert Parry (43) is performed for the first time, in Oxford.
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February 25, 1892: Nächtens op.112/2, a vocal quartet by Johannes Brahms (58) to words of Kugler, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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February 27, 1892: Emile Loubet replaces Charles Louis de Saulces de Freycinet as Prime Minister of France.
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March 2, 1892: Konstantinos Konstantopoulos replaces Theodoros Pangaiou Diligiannis as Prime Minister of Greece.
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March 3, 1892: The first all-Hugo Wolf (31) recital in Berlin takes place in the Duysen'scher Saal.  Six songs are performed for the first time:  Karwoche (first public), Auf ein altes Bild, Der Feuerreiter, and Der Geister am Mummelsee, all to words of Mörike, Epiphanias (first public) to words of Goethe, and Der Glücksritter, to words of Eichendorff.  It is well received.
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March 4, 1892: Concert for piano, violin, and string quartet by Ernest Chausson (37) is performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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March 5, 1892: Five songs for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (31) are performed for the first time, in the Saal der Sing-Akademie, Berlin:  Alle gingen, Herz, zur Ruh and Mögen alle bösen Zungen both to anonymous words (tr. Geibel), Saget, seid ihr es, feiner Herr to anonymous words (tr. Heyse), An eine Aeolsharfe (first public) to words of Mörike, and Wandl ich in dem Morgentau (first public).
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March 6, 1892: Great Britain extends a protectorate over the Trucial States (United Arab Emirates).
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March 10, 1892: Arthur Honegger is born at 86 boulevard François Ier (now destroyed) in Le Havre, Republic of France, the first of four children born to Arthur Honegger and Julie Ulrich, both Swiss. The birth certificate lists the father’s profession as “shop assistant” but he will soon be proprietor of a very successful coffee importing business.
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March 10, 1892: Trois sonneries de la Rose-Croix, three fanfares by Erik Satie (25), are performed for the first time, at the inauguration of the First Rosicrucian Salon at the Church of Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois, Place du Louvre in Paris.
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March 12, 1892: Chant Saphique op.91 for cello and piano by Camille Saint-Saëns (56) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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March 13, 1892: Grand Duke Ludwig IV of Hesse dies in Darmstadt and is succeeded by his son Ernst Ludwig.
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March 15, 1892: Jesse Reno receives a US patent for an “Inclined Elevator”, now known as an escalator.
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March 15, 1892: The “lever-style” voting machine is used for the first time, in Lockport, New York.
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March 15, 1892: A setting of Vexilla regis for chorus by Anton Bruckner (67) is performed for the first time, at St. Florian.
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March 17, 1892: Incidental music to Tennyson’s play The Foresters by Arthur Sullivan (49) is performed for the first time, in Daly’s Theatre, New York.
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March 18, 1892: Edward MacDowell (31) premieres the third movement of his Sonata tragica op.45 for piano in a solo recital in Boston. See 27 March 1893.
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March 19, 1892: Le fils des étoiles, a pastorale kaldéenne by Erik Satie (25) to a story by Péladan, is given a public dress rehearsal, in Galerie Durand-Ruel, Paris. See 22 March 1892.
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March 19, 1892: A suite from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s (51) unperformed ballet The Nutcracker is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg.
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March 20, 1892: Blessed is He Who Smiles for male chorus by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (51) to words of Grand Duke Konstantin Romanov is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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March 22, 1892: Le fils des étoiles, a pastorale kaldéenne by Erik Satie (25) to a story by Péladan, is officially performed for the first time, in Galerie Durand-Ruel, Paris. It is the first titled work that Satie wrote for the Salon de la Rose-Croix of Joseph-Aimé Péladan, whose goal is “to ruin realism, reform Latin taste and create a school of idealist art.” See 19 March 1892.
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March 23, 1892: Botho Julius August, Count zu Eulenburg replaces Georg Leo, Count Caprivi as Prime Minister of Prussia.
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March 26, 1892: Walt Whitman dies in Camden, New Jersey at the age of 72.
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March 27, 1892: Seid umschlungen Millionenen op.443, a waltz by Johann Strauss (66), is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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March 29, 1892: At a student concert at Moscow Conservatory, the first movement of Sergey Rakhmaninov’s (18) First Piano Concerto is premiered. The composer interrupts the conductor, Vasily Ilyich Safonov several times to instruct him in its correct interpretation.
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April 1, 1892: George Whitefield Chadwick’s (37) operetta A Quiet Lodging to words of Bates is performed for the first time, privately, in Boston.
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April 2, 1892: Cinq mélodies “de Venise” op.58 for voice and piano by Gabriel Fauré (46) to words of Verlaine, is performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris.
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April 3, 1892: Sergey Rakhmaninov (19) receives the subject of his graduation exercise from Moscow Conservatory, the libretto to a one-act opera named Aleko by Vladimir Nemirovich-Danchenko after a poem by Pushkin. Rakhmaninov is so excited he runs all the way home to get started on the music.
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April 6, 1892: The Symphony no.4 by Antonín Dvorák (50) is performed completely for the first time, in Prague, conducted by the composer. See 25 May 1874.
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April 8, 1892: The Congo Free State extends a protectorate over the Sultanate of Rafai in central Africa.
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April 8, 1892: String Quartet no.2 by Carl Nielsen (26) is performed publicly for the first time, in Copenhagen. See 18 December 1890.
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April 8, 1892: Hochbeglückt in deiner Liebe, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (32) to words of Goethe, is performed publicly for the first time, in the Saal der Sing-Akademie, Berlin.
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April 10, 1892: Under a state of siege, voting for the President of Argentina results in victory for Luis Sáenz Peña.
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April 10, 1892: During the celebrations for the centennial of Gioachino Rossini’s (†23) birth, Giuseppe Verdi (78) conducts the Preghiera from Mosè at Teatro alla Scala, Milan.
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April 11, 1892: In der Frühe, a song for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (32) to words of Mörike, is performed publicly for the first time, in Bösendorfersaal, Vienna.
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April 12, 1892: The second and third movements of Charles Martin Loeffler’s (31) String Quartet are performed for the first time, in Union Hall, Boston.
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April 12, 1892: Sonata for violin and piano op.3 by Max Reger (19) is performed for the first time, in Wiesbaden, the composer at the keyboard.
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April 15, 1892: The General Electric Company is incorporated in the State of New York following the merger of Edison General Electric, lead by Thomas Edison, and Thomson-Houston Company, lead by Charles A. Coffin.
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April 17, 1892: Easter Carol for solo voices, chorus, and organ by Charles Ives (17) to words of Elliott is performed for the first time, in Danbury Baptist Church, Connecticut. (This might not have happened.)
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April 20, 1892: Voting for the Folketing takes place in Denmark. The Left Reform Party loses 45 seats and its majority. The new Moderate Left Party becomes the largest party.
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April 21, 1892: Arpeggio study for piano by Gustav Holst (17) is performed for the first time, in Constitution Hall, Oxford by the composer.
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April 22, 1892: Edouard-Victorie-Antoine Lalo dies in Paris, Republic of France, aged 69 years, two months, and 26 days. His earthly remains will be interred in Père-Lachaise Cemetery.
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April 22, 1892: Nikolay Borisovich Obukhov is born in Olshanka, Kursk Province, Russian Empire, the son of Boris Trofimovich Obukhov, a nobleman, and Yekaterina Alyeksandrovna Obukhov.
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April 28, 1892: The concert overtures In Nature’s Realm, Karneval, and Othello by Antonín Dvorák (50) are performed for the first time, together as Nature, Life, and Love in a special farewell concert for the composer in the Rudolfinum, Prague.
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April 28, 1892: Kullervo, a symphony for soprano, baritone, male chorus, and orchestra by Jean Sibelius (26) to words from the Kalevala, is performed for the first time, in Helsinki, conducted by the composer. It is a great success and puts Sibelius at the head of a new generation of Finnish nationalist art. The success allows him to marry his fiancee, Aino Järnefelt, because it proves to her family that he can support her through composing.
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April 28, 1892: Five Poems by JP Jacobsen op.4, a song cycle by Carl Nielsen (26), is performed for the first time (all except To Asali ), in Copenhagen, in the first concert devoted entirely to the music of Nielsen.
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April 28, 1892: The Skeleton in Armor op.28 for chorus and orchestra by Arthur Foote (39) to words of Longfellow is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 29, 1892: Two songs for voice and piano by Gustav Mahler (31) to words of Brentano and von Arnim are performed for the first time, in Hamburg: Aus! Aus! and Nicht wiedersehen.
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May 1, 1892: Béla Bartók (11) makes his first appearance as pianist and composer, at a charity concert for the town of Nagyszöllös (Vinogradov, Ukraine), 300 km northeast of Budapest. Bártok plays the premiere of his The Course of the Danube as well as the first movement of the Waldstein Sonata of Beethoven (†65).
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May 4, 1892: The process for producing acetylene on a commercial basis is discovered by accident by Thomas Leopold Wilson in Spray, North Carolina. He has been trying to produce metallic calcium by combining lime and coal tar in a furnace. When he discards his failure in a nearby stream, the acetylene is given off.
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May 5, 1892: The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 is extended for ten years by the United States.
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May 5, 1892: Phoenix Expirans, a cantata for vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (37) is performed for the first time, in the City Hall of Springfield, Massachusetts as part of the Springfield Festival.
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May 13, 1892: Five songs for voice and piano by Hugo Wolf (32) are performed for the first time, in the Musikvereinssaal, Graz:  Ach im Maien war's, im Maien to anonymous words (tr. Heyse), Bedeckt mich mit Blumen (first public) to words of Doceo (tr. Geibel), Denk' es , o Seele to words of Mörike, Wehe der, die mir verstrickte, to words of Vicente (tr. Heyse), and Auf dem grünen Balkon mein Mädchen.
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May 15, 1892: Giovanni Giolitti replaces Antonio Di Rudini, Marquis of Starabba as Prime Minister of Italy.
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May 17, 1892: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (52) moves into new lodgings near Klin (now the Tchaikovsky museum), 85 km northwest of Moscow.
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May 17, 1892: How Sweet the Answer, a part-song by Hubert Parry (44) to words of Moore, is performed for the first time, in London.
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May 18, 1892: La vie du poète, a symphony-drama for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Gustave Charpentier (31) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Paris Conservatoire.
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May 19, 1892: Engelbert Humperdinck (37) marries Hedwig Taxer. They will spend the summer at the Bayreuth Festival.
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May 19, 1892: Sergey Rakhmaninov (19) plays his setting of the one-act opera Aleko for the examiners at Moscow Conservatory. He is awarded the gold medal. See 9 May 1893.
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May 19, 1892: Incidental music to Molière’s play Le Sicilien by Jean-Baptiste Lully (†205), restored by Camille Saint-Saëns (56), is performed for the first time, in Palais Garnier, Paris.
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May 21, 1892: Pagliacci, a dramma by Ruggero Leoncavallo (35) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Teatro dal Verme, Milan. The public is very positive. The critics are confused or hostile.
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May 28, 1892: The Sierra Club is founded in San Francisco by 182 charter members. John Muir is named President.
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May 29, 1892: Bahá’u’lláh dies in Acre (Akko) at the age of 74.
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May 31, 1892: An explosion and fire in an iron mine near Pribram, Bohemia (Czech Republic) kills 319 people.
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June 1, 1892: Gabriel Fauré (47) is appointed inspector of music in the provincial conservatories.
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June 5, 1892: Das deutsche Lied for male chorus and brass by Anton Bruckner (67) to words of Fels is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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June 6, 1892: The Chicago and South Side Rapid Transit Railroad begins operating an elevated railway in Chicago.
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June 7, 1892: Homer Plessy, an American of mixed-race, sits in a New Orleans railroad car reserved for whites. He is arrested and removed from the train.
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June 9, 1892: Alyeksandr Skryabin (20) receives a diploma from the Moscow Conservatory making him a “free artist.”
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June 10, 1892: Sergey Rakhmaninov (19) receives a diploma from the Moscow Conservatory making him a “free artist.”
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June 10, 1892: Jean Sibelius (26) marries Aino Järnefelt, the daughter of a general, at the Järnefelt home, Tottesund, near Vaasa.
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June 11, 1892: Edvard (48) and Nina Grieg celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary at Troldhaugen. For the occasion, he has composed Wedding Day at Troldhaugen.
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June 11, 1892: Installation Ode for chorus by Charles Villiers Stanford (39) to words of Verrall is performed for the first time, at the installation of the Vice-Chancellor, Cambridge.
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June 13, 1892: The Lotos-Eaters, a choric song for soprano, chorus, and orchestra by Hubert Parry (44) to words of Tennyson, is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, directed by the composer.
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June 14, 1892: Portugal declares national bankruptcy. The government ceases payments on its foreign debt.
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June 19, 1892: Two boys are found murdered in Necochea, Argentina. Police will use fingerprint evidence to identify their mother, Francisca Rojas, as the murderer. Confronted with the evidence, she will confess and be sentenced to life in prison. It is the first use of fingerprints to identify a criminal.
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June 20, 1892: Incidental music to Sylvestre’s play Poèmes d’amour by Isaac Albéniz (32) is performed for the first time, at the Lyric Club, London.
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June 22, 1892: Charilaos Spiridonou Trikoupis replaces Konstantinos Konstantopoulosas Prime Minister of Greece.
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June 23, 1892: A Russian Imperial decree increases property restrictions for suffrage, thus severely restricting the electorate.
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June 27, 1892: John Philip Sousa (37) signs a contract with band manager David Blakely to direct a new, civilian concert band.
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June 29, 1892: One day before their contract expires, workers at the Carnegie Steel Company plant in Homestead, Pennsylvania are locked out by the operations manager, Henry Clay Frick.
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June 30, 1892: The Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers begins a strike for higher wages at the Carnegie plant at Homestead, Pennsylvania. Andrew Carnegie and his operations manager, Henry Clay Frick, use the event to attempt to break the union. Workers at four other Carnegie plants walk out in sympathy.
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July 4, 1892: James Keir Hardie becomes the first socialist to win a seat in the British Parliament.
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July 6, 1892: The Carnegie Steel Company tries to bring 300 Pinkerton detectives on to their plant in Homestead, Pennsylvania in an attempt to reopen the facility. Shots are exchanged with striking workers and their families surrounding the plant. A full scale gun battle ensues with Pinkertons on barges in the Monongahela River and strikers on the bank, at one point bringing up a cannon. Ten people are killed. By evening, the Pinkertons surrender and are granted safe passage through the town, the strikers burning their barges. The town’s opera house is set up as a temporary prison. After hours of negotiations, the agents are removed from town and transported by train to Pittsburgh.
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July 7, 1892: Katipunan is founded by Andrés Bonifacio. It is a secret brotherhood organized to bring about the independence of the Philippines through violent means.
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July 7, 1892: Pinkerton agents saved from striking steel workers yesterday are released and sent out of Pittsburgh.
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July 8, 1892: A great fire destroys most of St. John’s, Newfoundland. Three people are killed. 11,000 are left homeless.
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July 11, 1892: French anarchist Ravachol (François Claudius Koenigstein) is put to death by guillotine at Montbrison.
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July 12, 1892: A flood originating from under a glacier at Mont Blanc destroys the village of Saint-Gervais-les-Bains and kills around 200 people.
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July 12, 1892: 6,000 Pennsylvania state militia arrive in Homestead, most of them surrounding the Carnegie Steel plant. They force the reopening of the plant and oversee the arrival of strike breakers.
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July 13, 1892: A young, provincial organist named Gustav Holst (17) travels from his home in Cheltenham to London to see Götterdämmerung at Covent Garden conducted by Gustav Mahler (32). He is stunned, both by the music and its performance.
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July 23, 1892: Anarchist Alexander Berkman, unrelated to the Homestead strike, enters the office of Carnegie manager Henry Clay Frick, shoots and stabs him. Frick survives and Berkman will be sentenced to 22 years in prison.
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July 26, 1892: Three weeks of voting conclude in the British general election. The Conservatives and their Liberal Unionist supporters lose 80 seats, the same number picked up by the Liberal Party. Although no party wins a majority, William Gladstone’s Liberals will form a minority government backed by the Irish Parliamentary Party.
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July 28, 1892: Peace I Leave With You op.8/2 for vocal quartet by Amy Beach (24) is performed for the first time, in the First Congregational Church of Nashua, New Hampshire.
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July 29, 1892: A testimonial concert for John Philip Sousa (37) takes place in the National Theatre, Washington.  His new march, The Belle of Chicago, is premiered.
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July 30, 1892: A farewell concert for John Philip Sousa (37) takes place on the White House lawn, attended by President Benjamin Harrison. Despite the rain, a large crowd attends. Sousa is presented with an engraved baton by the Marine Band, and after the festivities, Sousa receives his discharge from the Marines.
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August 1, 1892: John Philip Sousa’s (37) contract with manager David Blakely goes into effect. He will direct a new, civilian concert band.
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August 2, 1892: Inno per l’esposizione di Palermo for tenor, chorus, and orchestra by Pietro Mascagni (28) to an anonymous text, is performed for the first time, in the Piazza Grande, Livorno.
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August 4, 1892: The parents of Elizabeth Borden are murdered with an axe in Fall River, Massachusetts. Young Lizzie will be acquitted of the crime.
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August 8, 1892: Marquis Hirobumi Ito replaces Prince Masayoshi Matsukata as Prime Minister of Japan.
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August 8, 1892: Four of the Six Songs for medium voice and piano op.4 by Max Reger (19) are performed for the first time, at Wiesbaden Conservatory, the composer at the keyboard.
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August 15, 1892: Maurice Ravel (17) and Ricardo Viñes spend the day at the piano “experimenting with new chords.” Some of this will find its way into Ravel’s Habanera for two pianos.
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August 16, 1892: William Ewart Gladstone replaces Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, Marquess of Salisbury as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
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August 17, 1892: A cholera epidemic breaks out in Hamburg. Over the next few weeks, 8,500 people will die. However, nearby Altona is spared because it has been filtering its water since 1850.
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August 18, 1892: France and Russia enter into a secret military agreement, pledging to support each other in case of an attack on either of them by Germany.
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August 22, 1892: Jovan Avakumovic replaces Nikola Pasic as Prime Minister of Serbia.
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August 27, 1892: The Metropolitan Opera House in New York is virtually destroyed by fire.
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August 27, 1892: France separates the Sudan Territory (Mali) from Senegal and creates a new colony.
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September 4, 1892: Darius Milhaud is born in 1 place Félix-Baretin in Marseille, Republic of France, the only child of Gabriel Milhaud, an almond merchant, and Sophie Allatani, from a wealthy Modena family.
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September 7, 1892: James “Gentleman Jim” Corbett knocks out John L. Sullivan in the 21st round in a title fight in New Orleans. It is the first heavyweight title fight held under the Marquess of Queensbury rules.
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September 7, 1892: John Greenleaf Whittier dies in Hampton Falls, New Hampshire at the age of 84.
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September 8, 1892: Job, an oratorio by Hubert Parry (44) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Gloucester, conducted by the composer. Of this work George Bernard Shaw will write, “I take Job to be, on the whole, the most utter failure ever achieved by a thoroughly respectworthy musician. There is not one bar in it that comes within fifty thousand miles of the tamest line of the poem.” (Benoliel, 61)
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September 9, 1892: Amalthea, a moon of Jupiter, is discovered by EE Barnard at the Lick Observatory near San Jose, California. It is the first moon of Jupiter to be identified since Galileo saw the original four in 1610. It is also the last satellite to be discovered without photography.
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September 12, 1892: John Philip Sousa (37) holds the first rehearsal of his new civilian band, in New York.
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September 14, 1892: The German South West Africa protectorate (Namibia) is elevated to the status of crown colony.
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September 14, 1892: The first train to travel the new connection on the South African railroad completes its trip from Cape Town to Johannesburg.
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September 15, 1892: Taking his wife and three of his seven children (the other four he left in charge of his mother-in-law), Antonín Dvorák (51) leaves Prague for America.
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September 20, 1892: Now that the cholera epidemic in Hamburg has subsided somewhat, Gustav Mahler (32) decides to return.
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September 24, 1892: Haddon Hall, an operetta by Arthur Sullivan (50) to words of Grundy, is performed for the first time, at the Savoy Theatre, London. It is a success with critics and public.
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September 26, 1892: The new Sousa Band, led by John Philip Sousa (37), presents its inaugural concert, at Stillman Music Hall in Plainfield, New Jersey.
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September 26, 1892: Antonín Dvorák (51) and his family arrive in the new world at Hoboken, New Jersey aboard the SS Saale, nine days out of Bremen.
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September 27, 1892: Joshua Pusey of Lima, Pennsylvania receives a US patent for the “flexible match” (matchbook).
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October 1, 1892: Hans Pfitzner (23) takes up duties as teacher of piano and theory at Coblenz Conservatory.
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October 1, 1892: The first classes begin at the University of Chicago.
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October 1, 1892: Antonín Dvorák’s (51) contract in New York begins on this date and he is officially welcomed to the National Conservatory.
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October 5, 1892: The Dalton Gang is virtually wiped out while robbing a bank in Coffeyville, Kansas.
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October 5, 1892: Johannes Brahms (59) and Joseph Joachim give a joint concert on the second day of a three-day festival dedicating the new Bechstein Hall in Berlin.
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October 6, 1892: Alfred, Lord Tennyson dies in Aldworth, near Haslemere, Surrey at the age of 83.
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October 6, 1892: “Oh! Horror! Horror!”, a finale for Act II of the play Incognita by Isaac Albéniz (32) to words of Greenbank, is performed for the first time, in London.
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October 8, 1892: Prelude in c# minor for piano op.3/2 by Sergey Rakhmaninov (19) is performed for the first time, in Moscow by the composer.
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October 8, 1892: Music for tableaux vivants by Richard Strauss (28) is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Hofkapelle, conducted by the composer. The work was composed for the golden anniversary of the Grand Duke and Duchess of Weimar. He will later publish part of this as Kampf und Sieg.
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October 9, 1892: Great Britain extends a protectorate over the Gilbert and Ellice Islands (Kiribati, Tuvalu).
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October 10, 1892: The British SS Bokhara strikes a reef in the Pescadores during a typhoon. It goes down in five minutes. 125 people are lost, including eleven members of the Hong Kong cricket team. 25 people survive.
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October 12, 1892: Colombo, an oratorio by Carlos Gomes (56), is performed for the first time, in Rio de Janeiro, on the 500th anniversary of the landing of Columbus in the New World.
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October 14, 1892: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle is published.
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October 15, 1892: Great Britain and Germany reach agreement over Cameroon.
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October 15, 1892: 725,000 hectares of Crow reservation land in Montana is opened to white settlement.
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October 18, 1892: Telephone service begins between New York and Chicago. The first call is made by Alexander Graham Bell.
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October 20, 1892: For the first of only eight times, the Sousa (37) band marches, in a parade at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago.
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October 21, 1892: Antonín Dvorák (51) conducts his first concert in America, at Carnegie Hall. He conducts the premiere of his Te Deum for soprano, bass, chorus, and orchestra. Horatio Parker (29) plays the organ for the Te Deum.
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October 21, 1892: Columbus March and Hymn for chorus and orchestra by John Knowles Paine (53) is performed for the first time, at the dedication ceremonies of the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Also premiered is Ode for the Opening of the World’s Fair held at Chicago 1892 for vocal soloists, chorus, orchestra, and band by George Whitefield Chadwick (37).
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October 24, 1892: Robert Franz dies in his home at Luisenstraße 8 in Halle, German Empire, aged 77 years, three months, and 26 days. His mortal remains will be laid to rest in the Stadtgottesacker, Halle.
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October 25, 1892: Caedmar, an opera by Granville Bantock (24) to words of Corder, is performed for the first time, in the Olympic Theatre, London.
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October 27, 1892: Claude Debussy (30) dedicates copy no.45 of his Cinq Poèmes de Baudelaire to Erik Satie (26), whom he calls a “gentle medieval musician strayed into this century for the joy of his friend CA Debussy.”
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October 28, 1892: Anton Bruckner (68) leaves his position at the Vienna Hofkapelle following a serious illness.
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November 1, 1892: Mlada, an opera-ballet by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (48) to his own words after Krilov, is performed for the first time, at the Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg.
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November 1, 1892: An obituary for Robert Franz written by Eduard Hanslick appears in the Neue Freie Presse.  "With the death of Robert Franz, the last of the glorious circle has now departed which in youthful enthusiasm rallied around the banner of Romanticism unfurled by Mendelssohn and Schumann...Only Clara Schumann remains as the Madonna of the Davidsbündler-and God grant her a long life!  The last fading lights are now extinguishing from Leipzig's golden age.  Robert Franz was one of the most appreciated and talented of this circle." (Haas, 48)
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November 3, 1892: The first successful automatic telephone exchange system opens in La Porte, Indiana. It was designed by Almon B. Strowger of Kansas City, Missouri.
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November 4, 1892: Richard Strauss (28) departs Germany to spend the winter in Greece and Egypt.
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November 5, 1892: Three Orchestral Pieces from Sigurd Jorsalfar op.56 by Edvard Grieg (49) is performed for the first time, in Christiania, directed by the composer.
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November 8, 1892: Voting in the United States ensures the election of former President Grover Cleveland as President over the incumbent Benjamin Harrison. Cleveland’s Democratic Party loses many seats in the House of Representatives but retains control.
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November 9, 1892: In Autumn op.15/1 for piano by Amy Beach (25) is performed for the first time, at New England Conservatory, Boston by the composer.
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November 10, 1892: The Panama scandal becomes public in France. Ferdinand de Lesseps and others are arrested for corruption.
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November 10, 1892: I Rantzau, an opera by Pietro Mascagni (28) to words of Targioni-Tozzetti and Menasci, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Pergola, Florence. It is very successful.
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November 12, 1892: On his trip to Greece, Richard Strauss (28) visits Olympia. “The free sense of beauty, the religion of nature, pure visual perception--Olympia! Philosophical, world-transcending sublimity, profoundest inwardness--Bayreuth!”
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November 13, 1892: A setting of Psalm 150 for soprano, chorus, and orchestra by Anton Bruckner (68) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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November 15, 1892: The secretary of the Trinity Historical Society of Dallas, Texas writes to Arthur Foote (39) informing him that they have elected him an honorary member.
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November 16, 1892: Richard Strauss (28) arrives in Athens and remains for ten days, sending lengthy descriptions of his impressions to his family and friends.
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November 17, 1892: King Béhanzin of Dahomey sets fire to his capital Abomey and flees north as French troops enter the city.
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November 17, 1892: Sándor Werkele replaces Gyula, Count Szapáry de Szapár as Prime Minister of Hungary.
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November 20, 1892: I have sown green for chorus and orchestra by Leos Janácek (38) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) the composer conducting. Also performed is Janácek’s The mosquitoes got married for chorus and orchestra, perhaps for the first time, and the premiere of his orchestral arrangement of Dances from Haná.
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November 21, 1892: The Vier Zigeunerlieder op.112/3-6 for vocal quartet and piano by Johannes Brahms (59) are performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
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November 22, 1892: Forces of the Congo Free State (largely mercenaries) defeats Arab slave-traders at the Lomani River in the Upper Congo.
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November 22, 1892: Symphony no.8 by Anton Bruckner (55) is performed for the first time, in a four-hand piano arrangement, in Vienna. See 18 December 1892.
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November 27, 1892: Märchen aus dem Orient op.444, a waltz by Johann Strauss (66), is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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November 28, 1892: Le malade imaginaire, a comédie-ballet by Marc-Antoine Charpentier (†188) restored by Camille Saint-Saëns (57) to words of Molière, is performed for the first time, in Paris. For this production Saint-Saëns composed a new Sarabande et Rigaudon op.93.
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November 29, 1892: The third of the Four Sketches for piano op.15 by Amy Cheney Beach (25) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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November 30, 1892: Antonín Dvorák (51) is quoted in the Boston Post as saying that women can not contribute to the development of American music because of their intellectual inferiority.
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December 2, 1892: Eilende Wolken, Segler die Lüfte op.18 for alto and orchestra by Amy Cheney Beach (25) to words of Schiller, is performed for the first time, in New York.
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December 5, 1892: John Sparrow David Thompson replaces John Joseph Caldwell Abbott as Prime Minister of Canada.
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December 6, 1892: Alexandre Félix Joseph Ribot replaces Emile Loubet as Prime Minister of France.
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December 7, 1892: Pantaleón Enrique Joaquín Granados y Campiña (25) marries María de los Desamparados (Amparo) Gal y Lloveras in the Church of San Pedro de las Puellas, Barcelona. She is the daughter of a wealthy businessman
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December 7, 1892: Trio for piano and strings no.2 op.92 by Camille Saint-Saëns (57) is performed for the first time, at Salle Erard, Paris.
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December 11, 1892: Práxedes Mateo-Sagasta Escolar replaces Antonio Cánovas del Castillo as Prime Minister of Spain.
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December 11, 1892: I Come to Thee, for chorus and organ by Charles Ives (18) to words of Elliott, is performed for the first time, in Danbury Baptist Church, Connecticut.
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December 12, 1892: A pan-Slav congress convenes in Krakow.
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December 12, 1892: Der Schildwache Nachtlied and Verlor’ne Müh from Des knaben Wunderhorn, a cycle for voice and orchestra by Gustav Mahler (32) to words of Brentano and von Arnim, are performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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December 16, 1892: Two songs for voice and piano by Jean Sibelius (27) to words of Runeberg, are performed for the first time: Beneath the Fir Trees op.13/1, and To Frigga op.13/6.
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December 17, 1892: Erik Satie (26) and Contamine de Latour present their “christian ballet” Uspud, to Eugène Bertrand, director of the Théâtre National de l’Opéra. They have already sent the score to Bertrand, but the director did not acknowledge that he received it. An interview with the composer was arranged only after Satie sent his seconds to arrange a duel. Satie tells Bertrand, “...it is an artistic manifestation of great consequence, and we believe that the National Academy of Music should make it a point of honor to mount it with all the luxury and care that it deserves.” Satie further suggests that a commission should be formed to judge the work, half of them chosen by the Minister of Fine Arts, half by Satie and Latour. At that, Bertrand throws them out of the office.
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December 17, 1892: Allegretto and Pastorale from Three Compositions op.29 for organ by Arthur Foote (39) are performed for the first time, in Brooklyn.
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December 18, 1892: Two works for the stage by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (52) are performed for the first time, in the Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg: Iolanta, a lyric opera to words of Modest Tchaikovsky after Hertz, and The Nutcracker, a fairy-ballet to a scenario by Petipa after Dumas’ version of Hoffmann. Both works receive a tumultuous reception by the audience. Iolanta is savaged by the critics. Press reaction to The Nutcracker is mixed.
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December 18, 1892: The “Schalk” version of Symphony no.8 by Anton Bruckner (68) is performed for the first time, in Vienna. Present are members of the royal family, Crown Princess Stephanie and Archduchess Valerie, as well as Johannes Brahms (59), Johann Strauss (67), Hugo Wolf (32), and Siegfried Wagner. It is among Bruckner’s most successful nights in Vienna. The press is almost universal in their praise. See 22 November 1892, 5 July 1939, and 2 September 1973.
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December 22, 1892: Excerpts from Gustav Holst’s (18) operetta Lansdown Castle are performed for the first time, in the Assembly Rooms, Cheltenham conducted by the composer. See 7 February 1893.
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December 23, 1892: Edward Elgar (35) learns how to play golf, at Hasfield Court in Gloucestershire. He will later write, “Golf…is the best form of exercise for writing men, as it involves no risk of accident, is always ready without much preliminary arrangement, and has the inestimable advantage of being solidly respectable, inasmuch as it is seldom worth seeing and rarely worth reading about.” (Bird, 220)
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December 25, 1892: Andante for violin, viola, cello, and organ by Albert Roussel (23) is performed for the first time, in the Church of the Trinity, Cherbourg.
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December 25, 1892: Charles Villiers Stanford (40) concludes his tenure as organist at Trinity Chapel, Cambridge.
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December 27, 1892: Werther, a drame lyrique by Jules Massenet (50) to words of Blau, Milliet, and Hartman after Goethe, is performed for the first time in French, at Geneva. See 16 February 1892.
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December 27, 1892: Let Us Rise Up and Build for solo voices, chorus, brass, timpani, and organ by Horatio Parker (29) to words from the Bible is performed for the first time, at the laying of the cornerstone of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York.
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December 30, 1892: Forces of the Congo Free State win a second battle against Arab slave traders in the Upper Congo.