A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1886 – December 31, 1886

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January 1, 1886: Great Britain annexes “Upper” Burma to the Indian Empire.
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January 7, 1886: Charles de Louis Saulces de Freycinet replaces Eugène Henri Brisson as Prime Minister of France. His Minister of War is Georges Boulanger, an advocate of revenge against Germany for losses in the Franco-Prussian War.
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January 8, 1886: On a visit to the Villa Medici in Rome, Franz Liszt (74) hears a piano duet version of his Faust Symphony played by Paul Vidal and Claude Debussy (23). Unfortunately, the maestro falls asleep during the performance.
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January 8, 1886: Five songs by Johannes Brahms (52) are performed for the first time, in Vienna: Meerfahrt op.96/4, to words of Heine, Nachtigall op.97/1 to words of Reinhold, Dort in den Weiden op.97/4 to traditional words, Komm Bald, op.97/5 to words of Groth, and Trennung op.97/6, to traditional words.
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January 9, 1886: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson is published in London.
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January 9, 1886: The Sonata no.1 for piano and violin op.75 by Camille Saint-Saëns (50) is performed for the first time, in Paris, the composer at the keyboard.
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January 10, 1886: The Te Deum of Anton Bruckner (61) is performed for the first time with orchestra, in Vienna to great applause. See 2 May 1885.
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January 13, 1886: Lagos becomes a colony separate from Nigeria.
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January 13, 1886: Visiting Ernest Hébert, the director of the Villa Medici, once again, Franz Liszt (74) performs at the piano for his guests, among them Claude Debussy (23).
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January 16, 1886: The German Reichstag passes a resolution condemning the Prussian deportations which began last year.
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January 17, 1886: Amilcare Ponchielli dies in Milan at the age of 51.
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January 18, 1886: Nine teams form the Hockey Association in London.
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January 21, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) departs Rome for Budapest. It is the last time he will see the city.
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January 23, 1886: Two works for solo piano by Gabriel Fauré (40) are performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris: Mazurka op.32 and Nocturne no.3 op.33/3.
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January 24, 1886: Suite española for piano by Isaac Albéniz (25) is performed for the first time, in Salón Romero, Madrid by the composer.
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January 28, 1886: Zigeunerbaron-Quadrille op.422 by Johann Strauss (60) is performed for the first time, in the Hofburg, Vienna.
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January 31, 1886: Incidental music to Domoyov’s play Voyevoda by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (45) is performed for the first time at the Malyi Theatre, Moscow.
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January 31, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) resigns as conductor of the Meiningener Hofkapelle, effective at the end of April.
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February 1, 1886: A school is opened for the first time in Maidanovo, Russia, funded by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (45).
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February 2, 1886: Husaren-Polka op.421 by Johann Strauss (60) is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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February 3, 1886: William Ewart Gladstone replaces Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, Marquess of Salisbury as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
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February 4, 1886: Three Love Songs op.8 for voice and piano by George Whitefield Chadwick (31) to words of Bates are performed for the first time, in Boston.
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February 4, 1886: Two Pieces for piano op.8 by Arthur Foote (32) are performed for the first time, in Cleveland.
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February 6, 1886: Clemens Winkler isolates the element germanium in his Freiburg, Germany laboratory.
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February 7, 1886: A white mob forces 400 Chinese from their homes in Seattle. 100 are placed on a ship for San Francisco. Since local police sympathize with the mob, federal troops are called in. All but 15 Chinese are forced out of town. Martial law is enforced for the next two weeks.
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February 8, 1886: Unemployed workers riot in the West End of London after a meeting of the Social Democratic Federation in Trafalgar Square.
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February 10, 1886: The Song of the Viking for male chorus and piano by George Whitefield Chadwick (31) to words of Craigin is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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February 13, 1886: An die Tauben op.63/4, a song by Johannes Brahms (52) to words of Schenkendorf, is performed for the first time, in Mannheim.
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February 15, 1886: Blessed are the dead, a motet for chorus and organ by Charles Villiers Stanford (33) to words of the Bible, is performed for the first time, at a memorial service for Henry Bradshaw in King’s College Chapel, Cambridge.
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February 16, 1886: José Luciano de Castro Pereira Corte-Real replaces António Maria de Fontes Pereira de Melo as Prime Minister of Portugal.
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February 16, 1886: The Bostonians by Henry James is published in book form in London. It has already been serialized.
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February 20, 1886: Suite ancienne no.1 for piano by Isaac Albéniz (25) is performed for the first time, in Círculo de la Unión Mercantil e Industrial, Madrid by the composer.
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February 21, 1886: Khovanshchina, an opera by Modest Musorgsky (†4) to his own words, completed and orchestrated by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (41), is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg. It is produced by an amateur group because the Imperial Theatres rejected it.
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February 23, 1886: At Oberlin College, Ohio, fourth year student Charles Martin Hall completes work on an electrolytic method of extracting pure aluminum from ore.
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February 26, 1886: Two months after conquering “Upper” Burma, the British government joins it with “Lower” Burma, which they already hold. The new entity is simply called Burma, within British India.
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March 1, 1886: Four sacred pieces for chorus by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (45) are performed for the first time, at Moscow Conservatory: Cherubic Hymn in F, We Sing To Thee, Blessed are They, whom Thou hast Chosen, and Let My Prayer Ascend.
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March 3, 1886: Johann Sibelius (20) writes to his uncle Pehr that henceforth "Jean is my music name." (Mäkelä, 164)
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March 3, 1886: The Peace of Bucharest between Serbia and Bulgaria restores the status quo ante.
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March 6, 1886: The first power plant in the United States to use alternating current goes into operation in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.
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March 9, 1886: Love’s Philosophy for solo voice and piano by Arthur Foote (33) to words of Shelley is performed for the first time.
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March 9, 1886: Le Carnival des Animaux, grande fantaisie zoologique for two pianos, two violins, viola, cello, double bass, flute, clarinet, harmonica, and xylophone by Camille Saint-Saëns (50) is performed for the first time, at a Shrove Tuesday concert in Paris.
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March 14, 1886: Hymn of the Czech Peasants op.28 for chorus and piano by Antonín Dvorák (44) is performed for the first time, in Pilsen (Plzen).
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March 15, 1886: Emily Dickinson dies in Amherst, Massachusetts at the age of 55.
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March 17, 1886: Armed white men enter the courthouse in Carrollton, Mississippi where two black men are charging a white man with attempted murder. They shoot the plaintiffs and many blacks assembled for the trial. At least ten people are killed.
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March 20, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) arrives in Paris for celebrations during the year of his 75th birthday.
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March 20, 1886: William Stanley uses his newly invented alternating current voltage transformer in Great Barrington, Massachusetts to demonstrate the practicality and safety of high voltage transmission.
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March 23, 1886: The Manfred Symphony by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (45) is performed for the first time, in Moscow. A would-be composer named Sergey Rakhmaninov (12) attends.
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March 24, 1886: Duke Georg II of Saxe-Meiningen writes to his departing conductor Richard Strauss (21) thanking him for the dedication of his Piano Quartet and awarding him the Cross of Merit for Art and Learning.
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March 25, 1886: Paula Voit Bartók gives her son Béla his first piano lesson on his fifth birthday at their home in Nagyszentmiklós (Sînnicolau Mare).
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March 25, 1886: A setting of Ave regina caelorum for unison chorus and organ by Anton Bruckner (61) is performed for the first time, in Klosterneuberg.
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March 25, 1886: Charles Villiers Stanford (33) gives his first concert as conductor of the Bach Choir.
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March 29, 1886: After matches in New York and St. Louis, Austrian immigrant to the US Wilhelm Steinitz defeats Johannes Zukertort, representing Germany, in New Orleans, 12 ½-7 ½ in the first world chess championship.
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March 30, 1886: Queen Regent María Cristina appoints Isaac Albéniz (25) assistant professor of piano at the Real Conservatorio, Madrid.
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March 31, 1886: Hans Pfitzner (16) completes his general schooling, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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April 1, 1886: The Prince of Wales asks Arthur Sullivan (43) to compose an ode on words of Tennyson for the opening of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition next month. Sullivan will agree. See 4 May 1886.
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April 1, 1886: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky departs Moscow to visit his brother Anatoly in Tiflis.
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April 3, 1886: La naissance de Venus for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Gabriel Fauré (40) to words of Collin is performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, at the Salle Pleyel, Paris. Also on the program is the premiere of the Polonaise op.77 for two pianos by Camille Saint-Saëns (50) played by the composer and Fauré. See 8 March 1883.
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April 3, 1886: The electoral college of Argentina selects Miguel Juárez as President, the son-in-law of President Julio Roca.
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April 3, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) is informed that King Ludwig II of Bavaria has appointed him third conductor at the Munich Court Opera.
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April 3, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) arrives in England for a performance of his Die Legende von der heiligen Elisabeth in honor of his 75th birthday. A reception in his honor tonight at Westwood House is attended by leading English political and artistic figures such as Arthur Sullivan (43).
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April 5, 1886: An agreement among the great powers, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman Empire is signed, recognizing the union of Eastern Rumelia and Bulgaria based on a personal union between Bulgaria and Turkey under the Sultan.
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April 6, 1886: Representatives of Germany and Great Britain sign an agreement in Berlin marking borders between their spheres of influence in the western Pacific. They pledge the neutrality of the Navigator Islands (Samoa), the Friendly Islands (Tonga), and Niué.
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April 6, 1886: Charles Martin Loeffler (25) becomes engaged to Elise Fay, member of a wealthy family who are important patrons of music in Boston. She is an excellent amateur pianist and met Loeffler by playing chamber music with him.
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April 7, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) plays for Queen Victoria in a private audience at Windsor Castle. The last time they met was 41 years ago. The Pall Mall Gazette reports, “By the time he got to Windsor, the streets were crowded as for a Royal progress, and on his appearance everyone took off his hat. The Queen sent a royal carriage to meet him--a compliment seldom bestowed upon anyone under a Minister of State. At the Castle, the whole of the Royal household and servants turned out to meet him.” (Williams, 666)
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April 9, 1886: All meine Herzgedanken op.62/5 for unaccompanied chorus by Johannes Brahms (52) to words of Heyse is performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
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April 9, 1886: Enrique Granados (18) makes his first public appearance as pianist at the Barcelona Athenaeum in a concert by students of Joan Baptista Pujol.
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April 10, 1886: Gwendoline, an opéra by Emmanuel Chabrier (45) to words of Mendès, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de la Monnaie, Brussels.
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April 10, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) departs Meiningen to travel in Italy before taking up his new post in Munich on 1 August.
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April 11, 1886: Trösterin Musik for male chorus and organ by Anton Bruckner (61) to words of Seuffert is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 12, 1886: The Queen of Hearts, an operetta by John Philip Sousa (31) to words of Taber, is performed for the first time, in Albaugh’s Opera House, Washington.
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April 12, 1886: Two days after the premiere of Emmanuel Chabrier’s (45) Gwendoline at the Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels, the director of the theatre, Henry Verdhurt, files for bankruptcy. Members of the company organize themselves to run the house for the rest of the season. But because new compositions rarely fill houses, Gwendoline will be dropped after three more performances.
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April 15, 1886: The second setting of Um Mitternacht for tenor and male chorus by Anton Bruckner (61) to words of Prutz is performed for the first time, in Linz.
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April 15, 1886: Vorschneller Schwur op.95/5, a song by Johannes Brahms (52) to traditional words, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 18, 1886: Two songs for voice and piano by Gustav Mahler (25) are performed for the first time, in Prague: Frühlingsmorgen to words of Leander, and Hans und Grethe to folk lyrics.
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April 20, 1886: After a triumphant 16 days in London, Franz Liszt (74) departs England for the last time.
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April 25, 1886: 29-year-old Sigmund Freud opens his practice at Rathausstraße 7, Vienna.
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April 26, 1886: Prussia expropriates Polish landowners in Western Prussia and Posen.
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April 26, 1886: The major powers demand that Greece end support for the revolution in Eastern Rumelia.
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April 26, 1886: An der Wolga op.425, a polka mazurka by Johann Strauss (60), is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg.
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April 27, 1886: The French Equatorial Africa Protectorate is created. Count Pierre Paul François de Brazza is named Commissioner-General.
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April 27, 1886: Henry Hobson Richardson dies in Brookline, Massachusetts at the age of 47.
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April 27, 1886: Wiener Frauen op.423, a waltz by Johann Strauss (60), is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg.
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April 28, 1886: Adelen-Walzer op.424 by Johann Strauss (60) is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg.
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April 29, 1886: Russischer Marsch op.426 by Johann Strauss (60) is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg.
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May 1, 1886: Young Folks magazine begins serialization of Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson.
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May 1, 1886: The third version of Romeo and Juliet, a fantasy-overture by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (45), is performed for the first time, in Tiflis (Tbilisi). Also on the program is the premiere of Tchaikovsky’s Nocturne op.10/1 for piano. See 16 March 1870 and 17 February 1872.
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May 1, 1886: Variations symphoniques for piano and orchestra by César Franck (63) is performed for the first time, in the Salle Pleyel, Paris, conducted by the composer. The audience reaction is warm but not effusive.
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May 1, 1886: A general strike is called in the United States in favor of the eight-hour work day.
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May 3, 1886: Fighting begins between police, strikers, and scabs at the McCormick Reaper factory in Chicago when police attack unarmed workers. Several people are killed.
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May 4, 1886: Queen Victoria officially opens the Colonial and Indian Exhibition in Royal Albert Hall, London. Ode for the Opening of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition by Arthur Sullivan (43) to words of Tennyson is performed for the first time for the event.
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May 4, 1886: Chichester Bell and Charles Sumner Tainter receive three patents to cover improvements on their graphophone. It is the first practical phonograph.
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May 4, 1886: Chicago police attack a peaceful meeting of laborers called to protest the killings of yesterday. A bomb is thrown killing several policemen. Police respond by opening fire, killing or wounding an unknown number of workingmen.
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May 5, 1886: In response to the events of yesterday, Chicago police arrest dozens of labor leaders in the city.
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May 5, 1886: National Guardsmen fire on striking workers in Bay View, Wisconsin, near Milwaukee. Seven people are killed, many more injured.
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May 8, 1886: Due to the failure of Greece to demobilize following the ultimatum of 30 December, the major powers begin a blockade of Greece, compelling the government to end its support for Eastern Rumelia.
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May 8, 1886: Dr. John Stith Pemberton produces a new beverage in Atlanta, Georgia. He takes it to a nearby pharmacy where carbonated water is added and sampled by the patrons. The verdict is positive. He will soon market the product under the name Coca-Cola ®.
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May 10, 1886: The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy is published in book form. It has already been serialized.
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May 12, 1886: Representatives of France and Portugal sign an agreement in Paris delineating their common borders in Guinea.
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May 12, 1886: Dimitrios Valvis replaces Theodoros Pangaiou Diligiannis as Prime Minister of Greece.
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May 12, 1886: The Farewell of Hiawatha op.11 for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Arthur Foote (33) to words of Longfellow is performed for the first time, at the Apollo Club, Boston.
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May 15, 1886: The eighth and last Impressionist exhibition opens in Paris. Among the paintings is Sunday on the Island of Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat.
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May 15, 1886: Suite in E for string orchestra op.12 by Arthur Foote (33) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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May 15, 1886: Emily Dickinson dies in Amherst, Massachusetts at the age of 55.
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May 17, 1886: On the day of his birth, Alfonso XIII becomes King of Spain, replacing his sister, Maria de las Mercedes, under regency of Queen Maria Cristina.
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May 17, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) arrives back in Weimar after attending 75th birthday celebrations in Paris and London. He is so weak that his students have to lift him from the train and take him home.
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May 19, 1886: Symphony no.3 op.78 by Camille Saint-Saëns (50) is performed for the first time, in St. James’ Hall, London conducted by the composer. In the same program, Saint-Saëns plays the Piano Concerto no.4 by Ludwig van Beethoven (†59) conducted by Arthur Sullivan (44).
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May 21, 1886: Charilaos Spiridonou Trikoupis replaces Dimitrios Valvis as Prime Minister of Greece.
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May 24, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) arrives in Munich to take up his post at the Munich Court Opera. In the two months before his contract goes into effect, he will compose Aus Italien, inspired by the five weeks he just spent in Italy.
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May 27, 1886: 31 labor leaders are indicted in Chicago for the events surrounding the Haymarket riot of 4 May.
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May 29, 1886: The Atlanta Journal publishes the first advertisement for Coca-Cola®.
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May 29, 1886: A group of Sioux present a special performance of their dances at the Zoological Garden in Budapest.
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May 31, 1886: Alphons Diepenbrock (23) completes a master’s degree in classical literature.
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June 2, 1886: US President Grover Cleveland marries Frances Folsom in the Blue Room of the White House.
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June 4, 1886: A Mannheim newspaper announces that the first successful gasoline-powered car, the Motorwagen by Karl-Friedrich Benz, has completed its first test run. The announcement appears under “Miscellaneous.”
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June 7, 1886: The blockade of Greece by the great powers ends one month after it began when Greece demobilizes.
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June 8, 1886: Dr. Bernhard von Gudden, Dr. Hubert Grashey, Dr. Hagen, and Dr. Hubrich sign a document about the mental health of King Ludwig II of Bavaria.  "The mental powers of His Majesty are disrupted to such an extent that all judgment is lacking, and his thinking is in total contradiction with reality...he stands like a blind man without a guide at the edge of the abyss." (McIntosh, Ch.18)  They declare him incurable.
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June 10, 1886: Mount Tarawera, on the North Island of New Zealand, erupts, killing 100-150 people.
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June 10, 1886: Piano Quintet op.25 by Charles Villiers Stanford (33) is performed for the first time, at the Cambridge Guildhall, the composer at the keyboard.
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June 10, 1886: Prince Luitpold and other members of the Bavarian government sign a document removing King Ludwig II from power and creating a regency.
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June 13, 1886: King Ludwig II of Bavaria dies under mysterious circumstances in Lake Starnberger near Schloss Berg. His body is found floating in the water along with that of the psychiatrist, Bernhard von Gudden. It is believed that Ludwig drowns himself while von Gudden dies in the attempt to save him, but there is no direct evidence to support this. Ludwig is succeeded by his brother Otto. Since King Otto is mad, a regency is established under his uncle Luitpold.
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June 13, 1886: A fire in Vancouver, British Columbia destroys most of the city and kills at least 21 people.
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June 19, 1886: Large crowds line the streets of Munich for the funeral of King Ludwig II of Bavaria.  His body is laid to rest in the crypt of the church of St. Michael.
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June 21, 1886: Trial begins in Chicago of eight men (six of whom are immigrants) charged with conspiracy in the 4 May bombing.
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June 23, 1886: The Bonaparte and Orléans families are banished from France.
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June 24, 1886: Johann Strauss, Jr. (60) is granted citizenship of the Duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha in order to marry his mistress, Adèle Deutsch Strauss (no relation).
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June 25, 1886: When an Italian violinist named Superti is invited to conduct Aida in Rio de Janeiro, the audience hisses him off the conductor’s stand. Frantic, the management asks a young member of the cello section to fill in. The young man, Arturo Toscanini, is a compromise for the warring Brazilian and Italian factions among the musicians.
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June 26, 1886: Ferdinand Moissan isolates the element fluorine, in Paris.
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June 26, 1886: Manuel de Falla (9) receives First Communion in Cádiz.
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June 28, 1886: The first Canadian transcontinental passenger train leaves Montreal.
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July 1, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) arrives in Bayreuth for the wedding of his granddaughter, Daniela von Bülow.
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July 3, 1886: Karl Benz gives the first public demonstration of his new Patent-Motorwagen on the Ringstraße in Mannheim. The engine creates less than one horsepower and it travels at a top speed of twelve km/hr. As the first vehicle designed to be powered by a motor, it is widely seen as the first automobile.
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July 4, 1886: Divine Love for chorus by John Knowles Paine (47) to words of Charles Wesley is performed for the first time, in Portland (Maine) City Hall as part of the centennial celebrations of the city.
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July 4, 1886: The first Canadian transcontinental passenger train arrives in Port Moody, British Columbia.
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July 7, 1886: Queen Victoria gives the Cocos Islands to the Clunies-Ross family.
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July 9, 1886: Anton Bruckner (61) is awarded the Knight Cross of the Order of Franz Joseph.
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July 10, 1886: The British Royal Niger Company is chartered to administer the Niger River Delta protectorate.
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July 14, 1886: Great Britain and Germany agree on the border between Togoland and the Gold Coast (Ghana).
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July 15, 1886: Gustav Mahler (26) departs Prague. He will soon be taking up a new position as opera conductor in Leipzig.
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July 19, 1886: Franz Liszt (74) plays the piano in public for the last time, at a concert in the Luxembourg Casino.
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July 21, 1886: After an all-night train ride, Franz Liszt (74) arrives in Bayreuth for the Wagner (†3) festival. He suffers from a bad cough and high fever.
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July 23, 1886: The Republic of Counani (Republic of Independent Guiana) is proclaimed in territory claimed by both France and Brazil (Amapá). The new government favors the French.
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July 24, 1886: Representatives of Great Britain and China sign a convention at Peking. China accepts British authority in Burma. Britain agrees to remove its mission from Tibet.
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July 25, 1886: Gustav Mahler (26) arrives in Leipzig to take up his new position as opera conductor.
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July 25, 1886: Against his doctor’s orders, Franz Liszt (74) is carried into Wagner’s (†3) box at the Bayreuth Festspielhaus to view a complete performance of Tristan und Isolde, its Bayreuth premiere.
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July 26, 1886: Several of Franz Liszt’s (74) pupils arrive for the Wagner (†3) festival and are unable to see the master due to Cosima’s ban on visitors. A doctor orders that he give up his daily alcohol.
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July 27, 1886: Although the condition of Franz Liszt (74) takes a turn for the worse, his daughter, Cosima Wagner, can not attend him as she is required for a reception at Wahnfried. He begins to hallucinate and sweat profusely.
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July 27, 1886: Held seven months after the last election, four weeks of voting in the British general election come to an end. The Conservative Party of Lord Salisbury wins the most seats but fails to win a majority. However, they will govern with the support of the Liberal Unionist Party.
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July 28, 1886: A second doctor called in by Cosima Wagner to attend her father, Franz Liszt (74), diagnoses pneumonia.
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July 31, 1886: Franz Liszt awakes in the morning at Bayreuth clutching his chest and gasping for air. He is in this state for 30 minutes and then collapses. His doctor prescribes Hoffman’s Drops (ether and ethanol) and suggests that he drink wine and champagne.  23:30 Doctors inject something (perhaps camphor) directly into his chest. His body convulses and Franz Liszt dies of pneumonia at 9 Siegriedstraße (present Wahnfriedstraße), Bayreuth, German Empire, aged 74 years, nine months, and nine days. In attendance are his daughter, Cosima Liszt von Bülow Wagner, and his four grandchildren.
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August 1, 1886: Richard Strauss (22) enters into a three year contract as third conductor at the Munich Court Opera.
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August 3, 1886: As various dignitaries arrive for the Wagner (†3) Festival, the mortal remains of Franz Liszt are laid to rest at Bayreuth city cemetery.
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August 3, 1886: Robert Arthur Talbot Gascoyne-Cecil, Marquess of Salisbury replaces William Ewart Gladstone as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
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August 3, 1886: Gustav Mahler (26) conducts his first opera in Leipzig: Lohengrin.
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August 4, 1886: At the request of Cosima Wagner, Anton Bruckner (61) performs at a Requiem mass in honor of Franz Liszt in Bayreuth. He improvises themes from Parsifal at the organ. No music of Liszt is heard.
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August 9, 1886: Horatio Parker (22) marries Anna Ploessl, a piano student, in Munich.
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August 14, 1886: Victor Herbert (27) marries the singer Therese Förster in Vienna. They have been hired by Frank Damrosch for the Metropolitan Opera Company in New York. Damrosch recruited Förster but she asked that her fiancé Herbert be hired as a cellist so that they might marry.
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August 15, 1886: About 400 Chinese sailors from four visiting warships go on shore leave in Nagasaki. Angered by an incident between their compatriots and workers in a local brothel two days ago, they run amok. Chinese residents of the city add to the fighting by helping to arm the sailors. Clashes between sailors and police result in seven deaths and 75 injuries.
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August 16, 1886: Alphons Diepenbrock (23) visits Bayreuth where he sees Tristan und Isolde and Parsifal.
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August 19, 1886: A jury in Chicago convicts all eight of the defendants charged with complicity in the Haymarket incident of 4 May. Seven are sentenced to death. One is given 15 years in prison.
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August 20, 1886: As part of a military coup, Prince Aleksandur of Bulgaria is kidnapped by Russian officers and transported to Russian territory.
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August 21, 1886: Archbishop Kliment Turnovski becomes regent for the Prince of Bulgaria. He replaces Prime Minister Petko Stoychev Karavelov with himelf.
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August 24, 1886: Petko Stoychev Karavelov replaces Archbishop Kliment Turnovski as regent and Prime Minister for Bulgaria.
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August 28, 1886: A three-man regency takes power in Bulgaria in opposition to the coup. They ask Prince Aleksandur to return. Vasil Hristov Radoslavov replaces Petko Stoychev Karavelov as Prime Minister.
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August 30, 1886: Fritz (Frederick) Delius (24) is accepted as a student at Leipzig Conservatory.
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August 31, 1886: An earthquake centered at Charleston, South Carolina kills 60 people and damages at least 2,000 buildings.
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September 1, 1886: The Severn Tunnel, at over seven km, the longest railway tunnel in Britain, is opened by the Great Western Railway.
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September 3, 1886: Prince Aleksandur of Bulgaria returns to Sofiya.
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September 4, 1886: Apache leader Geronimo surrenders to United States forces in Arizona.
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September 7, 1886: Unable to engender Russian support, Prince Aleksandur of Bulgaria abdicates and once again leaves the country. He is replaced by a four-man regency council.
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September 9, 1886: Representatives of eight countries sign the Bern Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works. It requires signatories to treat intellectual property from all as if it were produced in their own countries.
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September 9, 1886: Suite moderne for orchestra by Hubert Parry (38) is performed for the first time, in Gloucester. It is very well received.
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September 13, 1886: Eleven months after buying them from Spain, Germany declares a protectorate over the Marshall Islands.
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September 21, 1886: William Stanley receives a US patent for an induction coil (transformer) making alternating current possible.
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September 23, 1886: Anton Bruckner (62) is received by Emperor Franz Joseph II. He thanks the Emperor for the Knight Cross of the Order of Franz Joseph. According to the story, Franz Joseph asks Bruckner if there is anything he can do for him. Bruckner asks that His Highness forbid the critic Eduard Hanslick from writing bad things about him.
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October 1, 1886: Richard Strauss (22) makes his opera conducting debut, in Munich with a production of Jean de Paris by Adrien Boieldieu (†51).
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October 6, 1886: A 38-year-old woman named Alice Roberts arrives at the door of Edward Elgar (29) in Malvern, Worcestershire, answering his advertisement of piano lessons. It is the first time he sees his future wife.
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October 6, 1886: Slavery is abolished in Cuba, mostly because it is less costly to pay them tiny wages than to provide year-round support.
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October 11, 1886: The first Congress of the French Federation of Trade Unions opens in Lyon. It lasts until the 16th.
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October 12, 1886: A hurricane comes ashore at the Texas-Louisiana border causing widespread flooding, massive property damage, and as many as 150 deaths.
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October 13, 1886: Victor Herbert (27) and his new wife Therese depart Bremen aboard the Saale making for New York.
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October 14, 1886: The Revenge: a Ballad of the Fleet op.24 for chorus and orchestra by Charles Villiers Stanford (34) to words of Tennyson is performed for the first time, in Leeds. It is his greatest success so far.
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October 15, 1886: St. Ludmilla, an oratorio by Antonín Dvorák (45) to words of Vrchlicky, is performed for the first time, in Leeds, conducted by the composer. During the rehearsals, the composer’s interpreter was Arthur Sullivan (44).
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October 15, 1886: The Vienna Philharmonic plays through Hugo Wolf’s (26) symphonic poem Penthesilea. At the conclusion, orchestra members openly ridicule the work.
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October 16, 1886: The Golden Legend, a cantata by Arthur Sullivan (44) to words of Bennett after Longfellow, is performed for the first time, in Leeds conducted by the composer. The work receives tremendous critical and popular acclaim.
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October 17, 1886: A statue of Hector Berlioz (†17) by Alfred Lenoir is inaugurated in the Square Vintimille, Paris.
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October 21, 1886: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (46) confides to his diary about Johannes Brahms (53). “It angers me that this presumptuous mediocrity is declared a genius.” (Wiley, 294)
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October 28, 1886: Liberty Enlightening the World, a colossal sculpture by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, is dedicated on Bedloe’s Island, New York by President Grover Cleveland.
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October 28, 1886: Symphony no.6 by Anton Rubinstein (56) is performed for the first time, in the Leipzig Gewandhaus, conducted by the composer.
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October 29, 1886: Great Britain and Germany agree to the border between their spheres of influence in East Africa (Kenya and Tanzania).
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October 30, 1886: Great Britain proclaims a protectorate over the island of Sokotra.
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October 30, 1886: Beim Abschied op.95/3, a song by Johannes Brahms (53) to words of Halm, is performed for the first time, in Hermannstadt.
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November 1, 1886: An agreement between Great Britain and Germany establishes spheres of influence in East Africa (later to become Kenya and Tanganyika).
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November 1, 1886: Giuseppe Verdi (73) writes the last note of Otello.
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November 2, 1886: Karl-Friedrich Benz receives a German patent for his Motorwagen. It is the first successful gasoline-powered car.
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November 4, 1886: Ophelia, a symphonic poem by Edward MacDowell (25), is performed for the first time, in New York. See 26 December 1886.
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November 5, 1886: Symphony no.2 by Alyeksandr Glazunov (21) is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (44) is in the audience and is greatly impressed by the music of his young friend.
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November 5, 1886: After dinner in his London home, WS Gilbert reads the complete libretto of Ruddygore to Arthur Sullivan (44).
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November 6, 1886: An article by Carl Valentine Lachmund appears in the American Art Journal. It extols the virtues of four expatriate American composers, especially Edward MacDowell (25).
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November 8, 1886: The Metropolitan Opera of New York begins its season with Die Königin von Saba by Karl Goldmark. The title role is taken by Therese Herbert-Förster while her husband, Victor Herbert (27) plays in the cello section.
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November 10, 1886: Meeting in Tirnova, the Sobranje elects Prince Waldemar of Denmark to succeed Prince Aleksandur of Bulgaria. His father, King Christian IX, refuses his permission because Tsar Alyeksandr III of Russia does not agree.
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November 11, 1886: Heinrich Hertz confirms the existence of electromagnetic waves, at the University of Karlsruhe.
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November 11, 1886: The Dirección General de Bellas Artes creates Isaac Albéniz (26) a member of the Royal Order of Isabella the Catholic. The ceremony will take place 22 November.
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November 14, 1886: The first and third of In Folk Tone op.73, a song cycle by Antonín Dvorák (45) to folk poetry, is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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November 14, 1886: Two works for male chorus by Leos Janácek (32) to traditional Moravian words are performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) conducted by the composer: O Love and Ah, the war.
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November 15, 1886: Erik Satie (20) joins the 33rd infantry regiment of the French army.
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November 21, 1886: Romain Bussine and Camille Saint-Saëns (51) resign from the Société national de musique when the committee agrees to Vincent d’Indy’s motion to allow old and foreign music. Within a week, César Franck (63) will become president, Vincent d’Indy (35) and Ernest Chausson (31) secretaries, and Gabriel Fauré (41) treasurer.
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November 24, 1886: Sonata for cello and piano no.2 op.99 by Johannes Brahms (53) is performed for the first time, in the Kleiner Musikverein, Vienna, the composer at the keyboard.
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November 26, 1886: Heimkehr op.7/6, a song by Johannes Brahms (53) to words of Uhland, is performed for the first time, in Vienna, 35 years after it was composed.
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November 30, 1886: The first music hall revue at the Folies Bergère in Paris takes place.
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December 2, 1886: A Partita for violin and piano by Hubert Parry (38) is performed for the first time, in London.
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December 2, 1886: Sonata for violin and piano no.2 op.100 by Johannes Brahms (53) is performed for the first time, in the Kleiner Musikverein, Vienna, the composer at the keyboard.
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December 5, 1886: Today is the name day of Mitrofan Petrovich Belyayev for which a string quartet has been composed with the four movements by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (42), Alyeksandr Borodin (53), Anatol Konstantinovich Lyadov and Alyeksandr Glazunov (21) respectively. Each movement is based on the theme B flat-A-F.
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December 8, 1886: 25 craft unions form the American Federation of Labor in convention in Columbus, Ohio. Samuel Gompers is elected first president.
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December 9, 1886: Erik Satie (20) leaves Paris with the 33rd Infantry Regiment for Arras.
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December 10, 1886: Symphony no.2 by George Whitefield Chadwick (32) is performed completely for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston, the composer conducting. See 7 March 1884 and 29 April 1885.
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December 12, 1886: Solitude dans les bois, a symphonic poem by Ernest Chausson (31) is performed for the first time, in the Eden Theatre, Paris.
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December 15, 1886: Love Took Me Softly By the Hand, the third of the Five Songs op.13 by Arthur Foote (33), is performed for the first time, in Boston, the composer at the piano.
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December 16, 1886: René Goblet replaces Charles Louis de Saulces de Freycinet as Prime Minister of France.
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December 16, 1886: Sonata for violin and piano in A by César Franck (64) is performed for the first time, during the Franck festival in Brussels. This is the last of several Franck works performed outside today. It is so late, the musicians (including Eugène Ysaÿe) can not see the music and perform most of it from memory.
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December 20, 1886: Trio for piano and strings no.3 op.101 by Johannes Brahms (53) is performed for the first time, in Budapest the composer at the keyboard.
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December 21, 1886: Incidental music to Sardou’s play Le crocodile by Jules Massenet (44) is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de la Porte Saint-Martin, Paris.
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December 23, 1886: In Monza, a son is born to Giacomo Puccini and his lover, Elvira Bonturi Gemignani, whose husband is a merchant in Lucca, a day after the composer’s 28th birthday.
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December 26, 1886: The symphonic poems Hamlet and Ophelia by Edward MacDowell (26) are performed together for the first time, in Wiesbaden. See 4 November 1886.
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December 28, 1886: Josephine Garis Cochran receives a US patent for the first practical dishwashing machine.
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December 30, 1886: An agreement between Portugal and Germany sets the boundary between Angola and South West Africa.