A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1873 – December 31, 1873

Event icon
January 1, 1873: Japan begins using the Gregorian calendar.
Event icon
January 1, 1873: Albrecht, Count von Roon replaces Otto, Prince von Bismarck-Schönhausen as Prime Minister of Prussia.
Event icon
January 1, 1873: A railroad opens between Mexico City and Veracruz.
Event icon
January 1, 1873: Louise Farrenc (68) retires from her position as Professor of Piano at the Paris Conservatoire.
Event icon
January 6, 1873: The US House of Representatives empanels a committee to investigate the connection between the Credit Mobilier and the Union Pacific.
Event icon
January 7, 1873: At the home of Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (28) in St. Petersburg, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (32) plays the finale of his Second Symphony to members of the kuchka. They unanimously approve of the work. It is the closest they will ever come to Tchaikovsky.
Performance icon
January 8, 1873: Music to Les erinnyes, a tragedie antique by Leconte de Lisle with music by Jules Massenet (30), is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de l’Odéon, Paris.
Event icon
January 8, 1873: Lunalilo is elected by the legislature to be King of Hawaii.
Death icon
January 9, 1873: Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (former Emperor Napoléon III) dies in Chislehurst, England following surgery.
Event icon
January 11, 1873: Heineken Bierbrouwerij Maatschappij NV is established in Amsterdam.
Performance icon
January 13, 1873: The Maid of Pskov, an opera by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (28) to words of the composer after Mey, is performed for the first time, at the Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg.
Event icon
January 14, 1873: Having been given the choice between a knighthood and a Civil List pension by Queen Victoria and Prime Minister Gladstone, Samuel Sebastian Wesley (62) accepts the pension, for his contributions to English Cathedral music.
Event icon
January 17, 1873: Richard Wagner (59) reads Götterdämmerung before a glittering assembly of potential subscribers gathered in the home of Count von Schleinitz in Berlin. “I cannot judge the impression the reading made, but I believe it was considerable.” (C.Wagner, 164)
Death icon
January 18, 1873: Edward Bulwer-Lytton dies at Torquay at the age of 69.
Performance icon
January 19, 1873: Concerto for cello and orchestra no.1 op.33 by Camille Saint-Saëns (37) is performed for the first time, at the Paris Conservatoire.
Event icon
January 22, 1873: The British frigate Northfleet is rammed in bad weather in the English Channel off Dungeness by the Spanish steamship Murillo. Almost 300 passengers and crew drown while only 86 are saved.
Performance icon
January 28, 1873: Der Gang zum Liebchen op.48/1, a song by Johannes Brahms (39) to traditional words, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
Performance icon
January 29, 1873: Les braconniers, an opéra-bouffe by Jacques Offenbach (53) to words of Chivot and Duru, is performed for the first time, at the Variétès, Paris.
Event icon
January 30, 1873: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours by Jules Verne is published in book form in Paris.
Performance icon
February 1, 1873: Symphony no.5 D.485 by Franz Schubert (†44) is performed publicly for the first time, in the Crystal Palace, London, 57 years after it was composed.
Event icon
February 1, 1873: James Clerk Maxwell dates the preface to his A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism.
Performance icon
February 7, 1873: The first version of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s (32) Symphony no.2 is performed for the first time, in Moscow. It is a rousing critical and popular success. See 12 February 1881.
Event icon
February 8, 1873: The Hungarian Diet votes money to create an Academy of Music in Budapest.
Performance icon
February 8, 1873: Johannes Brahms (39) conducts the Vienna premiere of Saul by George Frideric Handel (†113), with cuts.
Performance icon
February 8, 1873: Two songs for voice and piano by Gabriel Fauré (27) to words of Gautier are performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris: Les matelots op.2/2 and La chanson du pêcheur op.4/1. Also on the program is the premiere of the first three movements of Fauré’s Suite d’orchestre in a reduction for two pianos played by Camille Saint-Saëns (37) and the composer, as well as the premiere of Allegro Appassionato op.43 for cello and orchestra by Camille Saint-Saëns. See 16 May 1874.
Event icon
February 10, 1873: Richard Wagner (59) begins reading Origin of Species by Charles Darwin.
Event icon
February 11, 1873: In the face of uprisings and apparently without popular support, King Amadeo I of Spain abdicates and the First Spanish Republic is proclaimed.
Event icon
February 12, 1873: Estanislao Figueras y Moragas replaces Manuel Ruiz Zorrilla as Prime Minister of Spain and functions as President of the Republic.
Event icon
February 12, 1873: The Fourth Coinage Act goes into effect demonetizing silver and placing the United States on the gold standard.
Event icon
February 15, 1873: Mehmed Esad Pasha replaces Mütercim Mehmed Rüstü Pasha as Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire.
Performance icon
February 15, 1873: Valentin Alkan (59) makes his first appearance as pianist since 1849 in the first of six “Petits concerts” at the Salle Erard, Paris. Despite a couple of memory losses, the concert is warmly received by the audience.
Performance icon
February 16, 1873: Fosca, an opera by Carlos Gomes (36) to words of Ghislanzoni, is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan. The work is a failure.
Event icon
February 17, 1873: The separation of Geneva from the Diocese of Lausanne by Pope Pius IX without the approval of the State Council of Geneva or the Federal Council of Switzerland, causes the Swiss government to expel Bishop Gaspard Mermillod of Geneva from the country.
Performance icon
February 17, 1873: Three scenes from Modest Musorgsky’s (33) opera Boris Godunov are performed for the first time, at the Mariinsky Theatre, St. Petersburg. The performers and audience are very enthusiastic.
Performance icon
February 21, 1873: The chapel organ at Versailles, built in 1736 and newly restored by Cavaillé-Coll, is inaugurated by Camille Saint-Saëns (37) and Charles-Marie Widor.
Performance icon
February 23, 1873: Richard Strauss (8) appears as conductor for the first time, directing his first composition, Schneider-polka, orchestrated by his father, at a concert in Munich.
Event icon
February 27, 1873: Two members of the United States House of Representatives are censured for distributing shares in Credit Mobilier of America, the company building the Union Pacific Railroad, to Senators and Congressmen in return for political favors.
Event icon
March 1, 1873: Leos Janácek (18) begins duties as choirmaster of Svatopluk, a men’s society in Brünn (Brno).
Performance icon
March 1, 1873: Der Carneval in Rom, an operetta by Johann Strauss (47) to words of Braun after Sardou, is performed for the first time, in the Theater an der Wien, Vienna to great success.
Performance icon
March 2, 1873: The first of the Concert National series (later Concerts Colonne) takes place in the Théâtre de L’Odéon, Paris. Among the performers are Camille Saint-Saëns (37) and Pauline Viardot (51).
Event icon
March 3, 1873: The United States Congress passes the Comstock Act, providing criminal penalties for disseminating birth control or information about it. Presently, the US is the only western nation to have such a law.
Event icon
March 4, 1873: US President Ulysses S. Grant is inaugurated for a second term. The 43rd Congress of the United States convenes in Washington. Republicans continue their large majority in the Senate while greatly increasing their majority in the House of Representatives.
Performance icon
March 9, 1873: Hymnus: The heirs of the white mountain, a cantata by Antonín Dvorák (31) to words of Hálek, is performed for the first time, in Prague. It is his first major success.
Event icon
March 9, 1873: Emperor Franz Joseph II of Austria-Hungary refuses to approve the petition of Josef Ritter von Scherer to bequeath his title to his stepdaughter’s husband, Johann Strauss (47).
Performance icon
March 19, 1873: Szózat und Hymnus for orchestra by Franz Liszt (61) is performed for the first time, in Budapest.
Birth icon
March 19, 1873: Johann Baptist Joseph Maximilian Reger is born opposite the town hall in Brand, Upper Palatinate, Bavaria, German Empire, one of five children born to Joseph Reger, a schoolmaster and author of a harmony textbook, and Katharina Philomena Reichenberger.
Event icon
March 21, 1873: The Seniority (governing body) of Cambridge University votes to offer Charles Villiers Stanford (20) the post of assistant organist at Trinity College. He will accept.
Event icon
March 22, 1873: The Spanish Cortes abolishes slavery in Puerto Rico.
Performance icon
March 22, 1873: Two songs for voice and piano by Gabriel Fauré (27) are performed for the first time, by the Société National de Musique, Paris: Mai op.1/2 to words of Hugo, and Hymne op.7/2 to words of Beaudelaire.
Event icon
March 26, 1873: After an emissary from Aceh holds talks with United States officials in Singapore, the Dutch bombard Banda Aceh.
Death icon
March 26, 1873: Theobald Köstlin, the 28-year-old invalid son of Josephine Lang Köstlin (58), dies in Tübingen at the age of 28. The event throws her into an extreme and long-lasting depression.
Performance icon
March 30, 1873: Three Nocturnes for orchestra by Antonín Dvorák (31) are performed for the first time, in Prague.
Performance icon
March 31, 1873: Fisch-Ton-Kan, an operetta by Emanuel Chabrier (32) to words of Verlaine and Viotti, is performed for the first time, at the Cercle de l’Union Artistique, Paris.
Event icon
April 1, 1873: RMS Atlantic, twelve days out of Liverpool, strikes ground off Nova Scotia and goes down. Around 550 people are killed, 371 are rescued by residents of local fishing villages.
Performance icon
April 1, 1873: String Quartet in e by Giuseppe Verdi (59) is performed for the first time, in the Albergo delle Crocelle before friends of the composer mysteriously invited for the event. It is Verdi’s only work of chamber music. Of his string quartet, the composer later remarked, “I don’t know whether this quartet is beautiful or ugly, but I do know that it’s a quartet.”
Birth icon
April 1, 1873: Sergey Vasilyevich Rakhmaninov is born on the Oneg estate, near Semyonova, in the Russian province of Novgorod, the fourth of six children born to Vasily Arkadyevich Rakhmaninov, a retired army officer, and Lyubov Petrovna Butakova, daughter of a general. Both parents are descended from wealthy landowners.
Event icon
April 2, 1873: Austrian suffrage is reformed to favor Germans.
Event icon
April 5, 1873: Jovan Ristic replaces Milivoje Petrovic Blaznavac as Prime Minister of Serbia.
Event icon
April 6, 1873: St. Petersburg publisher Vasily Bessel announces the opening of subscriptions to the piano-vocal score of Modest Musorgsky’s (34) Boris Godunov.
Performance icon
April 6, 1873: Vom Donaustrande op.356, a polka schnell by Johann Strauss (47), is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
Event icon
April 8, 1873: Dutch troops invade Banda Aceh.
Performance icon
April 9, 1873: Le Roi Candaule, a play by Halévy and Meilhac, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre du Palais-Royal, Paris. It includes a song by Georges Bizet (34), “De ce gaillard entretien.”
Performance icon
April 10, 1873: Rédemption, a symphonic poem for soprano, female chorus, speaker, and orchestra by César Franck (50), to words of Blau, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de l’Odéon, Paris. Many of the audience walk out, perhaps owing to the performance.
Performance icon
April 11, 1873: On Good Friday, Marie-Magdeleine, a drame sacré by Jules Massenet (30) to words of Gallet, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de l’Odéon, Paris, to great success. See 9 February 1903.
Event icon
April 12, 1873: After hearing Marie-Magdeleine yesterday, Georges Bizet (34) writes to Jules Massenet (30) effusive in his praise. “Our modern school has never produced anything like it! You set me on fire, you rascal! You are a first-class musician, believe me!” (Massenet, 44)
Performance icon
April 12, 1873: Valentin Alkan (59) premieres three “chants” from his Book 4 op.67, in Paris.
Event icon
April 13, 1873: White paramilitaries battle the predominantly black state militia in Colfax, Louisiana. Three whites are killed while about 100 blacks die. About half of the dead are murdered after surrendering.
Performance icon
April 16, 1873: A fugue in ab minor for organ by Johannes Brahms (39) is performed for the first time, in Leipzig.
Performance icon
April 17, 1873: L’adorable Bel’-Boul’, an operetta by Jules Massenet (30) to words of Gallet, is performed for the first time, at the Cercle des Mirlitons, Paris.
Performance icon
April 22, 1873: Wiener Blut op.354, a waltz by Johann Strauss (47), is performed for the first time, at a ball to celebrate the wedding of the daughter of Emperor Franz Joseph to Prince Leopold of Bavaria in the Musikverein, Vienna. It is conducted by the composer.
Event icon
April 23, 1873: An attempt by Spanish monarchists to overthrow the new government is thwarted, largely through the efforts of Interior Minister Francisco Pi y Margall.
Performance icon
April 24, 1873: A report in the Iglau (Jihlava) Mahrischer Grenzbote tells of a performance of Sigismund Thalberg’s (†1) Fantasia on Themes from the opera Norma by one Gustav Mahler (12). The reporter is quite overwhelmed by the virtuosity of the young man, as was the audience.
Performance icon
April 24, 1873: The Lark, a song from the cycle Songs on the Words of the Dvur Králové Manuscript op.7 by Antonín Dvorák (31), to words of Hanka, is performed for the first time, in Jindrichuv Hradec.
Event icon
April 25, 1873: Two weeks after their invasion, the Dutch are forced to withdraw from Aceh by local defenders.
Performance icon
April 27, 1873: Three male choruses by Leos Janácek (18) are performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno): The Enforced Bridegroom, Serbian Folksong, and Ploughing under the direction of the composer in his conducting debut.
Death icon
May 1, 1873: David Livingstone dies at Ilala (Zambia) at the age of 60.
Event icon
May 1, 1873: The great Vienna Exhibition opens in the presence of Emperor Franz Joseph II, Empress Elizabeth, Crown Prince Rudolph, the German crown prince, and the Prince of Wales.
Event icon
May 5, 1873: Third Carlist War: Carlists defeat Republicans at Eraul, near Estella.
Event icon
May 7, 1873: US forces land at Bay of Panama, Colombia to protect US interests during local fighting.
Event icon
May 8, 1873: The prices in the Vienna stock exchange drop through the floor wiping out many individuals and companies. Panic sweeps Vienna with the usual accompaniment of suicides.
Death icon
May 8, 1873: John Stuart Mill dies in Avignon at the age of 66.
Event icon
May 9, 1873: The crisis in the Vienna stock exchange is so precipitous that the word “crash” is used for the first time, in a Vienna newspaper. The event leads to worldwide financial calamities. Since the beginning of the month, over 200 companies in Vienna have declared bankruptcy.
Event icon
May 11, 1873: A second railway in Japan opens from Kobe to Osaka.
Event icon
May 11, 1873: Over the next five days, the “May Laws” are announced by Adalbert Falk, Prussian Minister of Ecclesiastical Affairs. They eliminate the jurisdiction of the Vatican over the Catholic Church in Prussia. Only priests educated in Germany may serve in German churches.
Event icon
May 18, 1873: In the presence of Vincent d’Indy (22) and other musical notables in Weimar, Franz Liszt (61) plays through The Nursery by Modest Musorgsky (34). Liszt and all present are delighted with what they find.
Event icon
May 20, 1873: Lieutenant Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (29) is appointed Inspector of Music Bands of the Russian Navy Department.
Event icon
May 20, 1873: 16 women are convicted of obstructing strikebreakers in a court in Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire. Since the incident took place in Ascott-under-Wychwood, they become known as the Ascott martyrs. Seven of them are sentenced to ten days imprisonment with hard labor, the other nine are imprisoned for seven days with hard labor. In the evening, about 1,000 people riot in an unsuccessful attempt to liberate the women. Eventually, they will be pardoned by Queen Victoria.
Event icon
May 20, 1873: German-born Levi Strauss receives a US patent for canvas pants with copper rivets as reinforcement. The idea actually came from Jacob Davis, a tailor in Reno, Nevada who requested Strauss’ help in securing a patent. Davis will become Strauss’ production manager.
Death icon
May 22, 1873: Italian novelist Alessandro Manzoni, hero of Giuseppe Verdi (59), dies in Milan at the age of 89.
Performance icon
May 22, 1873: Anton Rubinstein (43) gives his last concert in North America, in New York. In the last twelve days alone he gave 14 concerts in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia, ten of which were solo recitals. Since arriving last September he has given 203 performances in 58 cities as far north as Montreal, west as Burlington, Iowa and south as New Orleans. It has been perhaps the most successful and tumultuous such tour of the nineteenth century.
Performance icon
May 23, 1873: Incidental music to Ostrovsky’s play The Snow Maiden by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (33) is performed for the first time, at the Bolshoy Theatre, Moscow.
Event icon
May 23, 1873: The Canadian Parliament approves an act providing for the establishment of a “Mounted Police Force for the Northwest Territories.” (known today as the RCMP)
Event icon
May 24, 1873: Marie Edmé Patrice Maurice, comte de Mac-Mahon, Duc de Magenta replaces Marie Joseph Louis Adolphe Thiers as President of France.
Event icon
May 24, 1873: Alexandra Palace is opened in London on Queen Victoria’s birthday. It covers 3 hectares.
Event icon
May 24, 1873: The Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung publishes Heinrich Schliemann’s account of the discovery of Troy at Hisarlik, Turkey.
Performance icon
May 24, 1873: Le roi l’a dit, an opéra comique by Léo Delibes (37) to words of Gondinet, is performed for the first time, at the Opéra-Comique, Paris.
Event icon
May 25, 1873: Jacques Albert, duc de Broglie replaces Jules Armand Stanislas Dufaure as Prime Minister of France.
Performance icon
May 27, 1873: Incidental music to Longfellow’s play The Spanish Student by Charles Villiers Stanford (20) is performed for the first time, at Cambridge University directed by the composer.
Event icon
May 29, 1873: Russian forces capture Khiva (in present Uzbekistan).
Performance icon
May 29, 1873: Christus, an oratorio by Franz Liszt (61) to words from the Bible and the Roman Catholic liturgy, is performed completely for the first time, in the Weimar Stadtkirche, conducted by the composer. Liszt’s daughter, Cosima, and his son-in-law Richard Wagner (60) are present. Cosima reports that “Richard’s reaction covers all extremes, from ravishment to immense indignation, in his attempt to do it both profound and loving justice.” (C.Wagner, 178)
Event icon
June 1, 1873: Jacques Offenbach (53) takes over management of the Théâtre de la Gaîté, Paris.
Event icon
June 2, 1873: After being emotionally unable to attend the funeral of Alessandro Manzoni, Giuseppe Verdi (59) travels to Milan to visit his grave. In a day or two, Verdi will write to the mayor of Milan, offering to compose a Requiem mass for the anniversary of Manzoni’s death. See 22 May 1874.
Event icon
June 2, 1873: By a vote of the President and Fellows of Harvard University, John Knowles Paine (34) is appointed Assistant Professor of Music. He is the first to hold such a position in the United States.
Performance icon
June 3, 1873: St. Peter, an oratorio by John Knowles Paine (34), is performed for the first time, in Portland, Maine.
Event icon
June 5, 1873: The slave trade is abolished by the Sultan of Zanzibar, under pressure from the British.
Event icon
June 9, 1873: 16 days after opening, Alexandra Palace is destroyed by fire.
Event icon
June 11, 1873: Francisco Pi y Margall replaces Estanislao Figueras y Moragas as President of the Executive Power and Prime Minister of Spain.
Event icon
June 16, 1873: Tsar Alyeksandr II affirms a new charter for the Russian Musical Society adding the title “Imperial” and assuming financial responsibility.
Event icon
June 17, 1873: Susan B. Anthony is convicted in a Canandaigua, New York court of voting in the election last November. She will be fined $100 (which she will never pay).
Event icon
July 1, 1873: Prince Edward Island joins the Dominion of Canada.
Performance icon
July 3, 1873: Rotunde-Quadrille op.360 by Johann Strauss (47) is performed for the first time, in the Musikpavillon bei der Rotunde im Prater, Vienna.
Performance icon
July 5, 1873: War Song for male chorus and piano by Leos Janácek (19) to anonymous words is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer.
Event icon
July 9, 1873: A revolt by socialist workers takes place in Alcoy, Spain where the republican mayor is murdered.
Event icon
July 9, 1873: The German Empire adopts the Mark as its unified currency.
Event icon
July 9, 1873: Third Carlist War: Carlists ambush a Republican column at Alpens, near Berga. Almost the entire forced is killed or captured.
Performance icon
July 9, 1873: Three new works by Johann Strauss (47) are performed for the first time, in the Gartenbau, Vienna: the waltz Carnevalsbilder op.357, the polka française Nimm sie hin! op.358, and the polka mazurka Gruß aus Osterreich op.359.
Event icon
July 10, 1873: Paul Verlaine shoots Arthur Rimbaud in the wrist after the two argue heatedly in a Brussels hotel. Verlaine will be imprisoned for two years.
Event icon
July 12, 1873: A bar mitzvah for Gustav Mahler (13) takes place in Iglau, Bohemia (Jihlava, Czech Republic).
Event icon
July 18, 1873: Spanish president Francisco Pi y Margall resigns. He is succeeded by Nicolas Salmerón y Alonso who also takes the title of Prime Minister.
Event icon
July 18, 1873: In a courtroom in Canandaigua, New York, Susan B. Anthony is sentenced to pay $100 and court costs for voting in the election of last 5 November. She will never pay anything.
Event icon
August 2, 1873: Accompanied by a small local ceremony, the roof is raised on the Bayreuth Festspielhaus. Attending along with Wagner (60) and his family is his father-in-law, Franz Liszt (61).
Event icon
August 2, 1873: A cable car is tested successfully in San Francisco.
Death icon
August 4, 1873: Victor Hartmann, painter-friend of Modest Musorgsky (34) dies in Kireyev, near Moscow.
Event icon
August 5, 1873: In the Augbsurger Allgemeine Zeitung, Heinrich Schliemann announces that he has found “Priam’s Treasure” at Hisarlik, Turkey. It is gold and other artifacts which he takes to be Homeric in origin.
Performance icon
August 6, 1873: Bei uns z’Haus op.361, a waltz for male chorus and orchestra by Johann Strauss (47), is performed for the first time, in Schwender’s “Neue Welt”, Vienna
Event icon
August 7, 1873: Republican forces enter Valencia ending the revolt.
Event icon
August 10, 1873: Marco Minghetti replaces Giovanni Lanza as Prime Minister of Italy.
Event icon
August 11, 1873: Richard Wagner (60) writes to King Ludwig II of Bavaria telling him that the German aristocracy is investing all its money in “Jewish and Jesuit” concerns and not him and his Festspielhaus. He asks for a loan of 100,000 taler. He will not receive a reply.
Event icon
August 12, 1873: A peace treaty is signed at Gandumjan between Russia and the Khan of Khiva. Khiva retains nominal independence but is actually a protectorate of Russia.
Event icon
August 17, 1873: One of the first language laws in Belgium is approved. Flemish is allowed in courts in the Flemish provinces, although French could be used if the accused agrees.
Event icon
August 18, 1873: Americans Charles Begole, Albert Johnson, and John Lucas make the first ascent of Mt. Whitney (4,418 meters)
Event icon
August 24, 1873: “The Great Gale” hits the Maritime provinces of Canada. Approximately 1,000 people are killed on land and sea. Many structures are destroyed.
Event icon
August 25, 1873: Giacomo Puccini (14) passes his oral examination for the fifth and last year of Ginnasio. He had to repeat the last year.
Performance icon
August 27, 1873: The Light of the World, an oratorio by Arthur Sullivan (31) to words of the Bible selected by the composer, is performed for the first time, in Birmingham, conducted by the composer. The audience, which includes the Duke of Edinburgh, is very appreciative.
Event icon
August 30, 1873: An Austrian expedition under Carl Weyprecht and Julius von Payer aboard the Tegetgoff discovers a previously unknown archipelago in the Arctic Ocean. They name it Franz Joseph Land after their emperor.
Event icon
August 30, 1873: The Act approved on 23 May is brought into force by Order-in-Council. The Northwest Mounted Police (RCMP) are formed to maintain order in the Canadian outback.
Event icon
September 1, 1873: Regular cable car service begins in San Francisco.
Performance icon
September 2, 1873: Incidental music to Barrière and Davyl’s drame Le gascon by Jacques Offenbach (54), is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de la Gaîté, Paris. This first production under Offenbach’s management of the Gaîté is a flop.
Performance icon
September 4, 1873: Pomme d’api, an operetta by Jacques Offenbach (54) to words of Halévy and Busnach, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de la Renaissance, Paris.
Event icon
September 7, 1873: President Nicolas Salmerón y Alonso of Spain resigns, succeeded by Emilio Manuel Castelar Ripoll who also takes the title of Prime Minister.
Event icon
September 13, 1873: Anton Bruckner (49) visits Bayreuth to ask Richard Wagner (60) to accept the dedication of his Symphony no.3.
Death icon
September 16, 1873: Sultan Muhammad IV of Morocco dies in Marrakesh and is succeeded by his son Hasan I.
Event icon
September 16, 1873: A treaty signed by the Khan of Bukhara accepts a Russian protectorate.
Event icon
September 16, 1873: France having paid an indemnity of 5,000,000,000 francs, German troops depart Verdun, the last part of French territory they hold.
Event icon
September 18, 1873: The Philadelphia banking house of Jay Cooke & Co., part financer of the Northern Pacific Railroad, fails, precipitating the “Panic of ‘73” in the United States.
Event icon
September 20, 1873: President Castelar of Spain institutes a dictatorship and rules by decree.
Event icon
September 20, 1873: The New York Stock Exchange is forced to close for the first time, owing to the financial panic.
Event icon
September 23, 1873: For the second time this year, US forces land at Bay of Panama, Colombia to protect US interests during local fighting.
Performance icon
September 23, 1873: Wartburg Lieder for tenor, two baritones, chorus, and orchestra by Franz Liszt (61) is performed for the first time, in Wartburg.
Event icon
October 1, 1873: A Season in Hell by Arthur Rimbaud is published this month in Brussels.
Event icon
October 6, 1873: Third Carlist War: Carlists and Republicans battle at Mañeru in Navarre. Both sides claim victory.
Performance icon
October 18, 1873: String Quartet no.2 op.51/2 by Johannes Brahms (40) is performed for the first time, in the Berlin Singakademie.
Event icon
October 22, 1873: Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Russia cement their alliance in the Dreikaiserbund.
Performance icon
October 25, 1873: On his 48th birthday, Johann Strauss conducts a concert for the benefit of Hungarian victims of a cholera epidemic, in Vienna. He premieres his Csárdás für Gesang, to words of Genée, part of the operetta he is working on. It is so successful that he hurries to finish the rest of the work: Die Fledermaus.
Performance icon
October 26, 1873: The original version of Anton Bruckner’s (49) Symphony no.2 is performed for the first time, in Vienna, conducted by the composer. It is the first orchestral work by Bruckner to be performed in the capital. Reaction is mixed, but Bruckner is pleased. See 20 February 1876.
Event icon
October 27, 1873: The Comte de Chambord, pretender to the French throne, refuses to accept the tricolor as the national flag. This ends any hope of restoring the monarchy.
Event icon
October 28, 1873: The Paris Opéra in the Rue Le Peletièr catches fire. The alarm is sounded at 23:25.
Performance icon
October 28, 1873: At Welhaven’s Grave EG165 for male chorus by Edvard Grieg (29) to words of Moe is performed for the first time, in Christiania (Oslo).
Event icon
October 29, 1873: 02:30 The roof of the Paris Opéra collapses. By 04:00 the fire is brought under control.
Death icon
October 29, 1873: King Johann of Saxony dies at Pillnitz and is succeeded by his son Albert.
Event icon
October 30, 1873: Franz Liszt (62) enters his new home in the Fish Market, Budapest.
Event icon
October 31, 1873: The international bridge over Niagara Falls opens.
Event icon
October 31, 1873: Spanish naval forces capture the Virginius on the high seas near Jamaica. The schooner is illegally flying the US flag and carries men and materiel to Cuban insurgents. The captain, 36 crew, and 12 passengers will be executed. 102 survivors will be turned over to American authorities.
Performance icon
November 2, 1873: Variations on a Theme by Joseph Haydn op.56a for orchestra by Johannes Brahms (40) is performed for the first time, in the Großer Saal der Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, Vienna, conducted by the composer. It is very successful.
Event icon
November 3, 1873: Jovan Marinovic replaces Jovan Ristic as Prime Minister of Serbia.
Event icon
November 7, 1873: Canadian Prime Minister John Alexander MacDonald and his cabinet resign as a result of the Pacific Scandal which resulted from charges that MacDonald received campaign contributions from a contractor wanting to build a trans-Canada railroad. He is replaced as prime minister by Alexander MacKenzie.
Event icon
November 7, 1873: Today and tomorrow, 48 men from the Virginius, captured 31 October, are executed in Santiago.
Event icon
November 7, 1873: Third Carlist War: Republicans attack Carlists at Montejurra in Navarre. Both sides claim victory but the Republicans withdraw.
Event icon
November 8, 1873: A grand jubilee of three days begins in Budapest to honor the 50th anniversary of Franz Liszt’s (62) career as a performer and composer. The honoree has come from Rome for the events.
Event icon
November 8, 1873: HMS Niobe arrives in Santiago de Cuba and threatens to bombard the town if executions of the Virginius crew are not halted. The executions stop.
Performance icon
November 8, 1873: Barcarole op.44/3 for chorus by Johannes Brahms (40) to traditional Italian words translated by Witte is performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
Performance icon
November 8, 1873: Incidental music to Barbier’s play Jeanne d’Arc by Charles Gounod (55) is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de la Gaîté, Paris. The critical response is somewhat tepid.
Event icon
November 9, 1873: Otto, Prince von Bismarck-Schönhausen replaces Albrecht, Count von Roon as Prime Minister of Prussia.
Event icon
November 9, 1873: The Balakirev (36) circle sends a telegram to Franz Liszt (62) congratulating him on 50 years in music.
Performance icon
November 9, 1873: The Fickleness of Love for male choir by Leos Janácek (19) to a traditional Moravian text is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer.
Event icon
November 11, 1873: Dutch forces invade Aceh for a second time. They manage to hold their positions, but will never fully control the area.
Event icon
November 14, 1873: A student at Moscow Conservatory, Eduard Zak, kills himself. It is possible that he has been having a love affair with one of the professors, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (33).
Event icon
November 17, 1873: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (33) goes to a concert for the first time as a critic, in Moscow.
Event icon
November 17, 1873: Buda, Obuda, and Pest are joined together to form Budapest.
Event icon
November 17, 1873: In St. Peter’s Church, Prague, Kingdom of Bohemia, Antonín Dvorák (32) marries Anna Cermáková, daughter of a goldsmith and his piano pupil for several years. She is already pregnant. He moves into her parents’ house at 1413 Na Florenci Street.
Event icon
November 19, 1873: The French National Assembly sets the term of President Mac-Mahon at seven years.
Event icon
November 19, 1873: William Tweed is convicted of defrauding New York City of $30,000,000.
Birth icon
November 20, 1873: Daniel Gregory Mason is born in Brookline, Massachusetts, USA, the son of Henry Mason, founder of Mason and Hamlin piano and organ builders. His uncle is William Mason, concert pianist and composer, and he is the grandson of Lowell Mason (†1), composer of hymns.
Event icon
November 22, 1873: The French SS Ville du Havre collides with the British Loch Earn halfway between New York and France. It goes down in twelve minutes with 226 souls. 87 others are saved.
Event icon
November 23, 1873: Thomas Hardy’s Far From the Madding Crowd is published in London.
Event icon
November 24, 1873: Joseph Glidden of DeKalb, Illinois receives the first patent for barbed wire.
Performance icon
November 24, 1873: Ferruccio Busoni (7) appears as pianist for the first time in public, at the Schiller-Verein in Trieste. He plays music of Mozart (†81), Schumann (†17), and Clementi (†41).
Event icon
November 29, 1873: US and Spanish officials reach agreement in Washington over the Virginius affair. Spain agrees to release the ship and all remaining crew, and pay an indemnity.
Performance icon
November 29, 1873: La jolie parfumeuse, an opéra-comique by Jacques Offenbach (54) to words of Crémieux and Blum, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de la Renaissance, Paris.
Performance icon
December 1, 1873: Der englische Gruss op.22/1 for unaccompanied chorus by Johannes Brahms (40) to traditional German words is performed for the first time, in Munich.
Performance icon
December 5, 1873: Four songs by Johannes Brahms (40) are performed for the first time, in Frankfurt: Ruhe, Süssliebchen op.33/9 to words of Tieck, Die Kränze op.46/1 to ancient Greek words, Auf dem See op.59/1 to words of Simrock, and Das Lied vom Hern von Falkenstein op.43/4 to traditional words.
Performance icon
December 7, 1873: Phaëton op.39, a symphonic poem by Camille Saint-Saëns (38) is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris.
Performance icon
December 8, 1873: Christus factus est for chorus, strings, and three trombones by Anton Bruckner (49), is performed for the first time, at the Vienna Hofburgkapelle, the composer conducting.
Performance icon
December 11, 1873: String Quartet no.1 op.51/1 by Johannes Brahms (40) is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
Event icon
December 12, 1873: After the papacy objects to the expelling of Bishop Mermillod from Switzerland last February, the Papal Nuncio is expelled from the country.
Event icon
December 13, 1873: Modest Musorgsky (34) is promoted to the grade of Court Councillor.
Death icon
December 14, 1873: Louis Agassiz dies in Cambridge, Massachusetts at the age of 66.
Performance icon
December 19, 1873: The Tempest, a symphonic fantasia by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (33), is performed for the first time, in Moscow. The work is accorded a warm reception.
Performance icon
December 22, 1873: Five Songs (Ophelia-Lieder) WoO 22 for voice and piano by Johannes Brahms (40) to words of Shakespeare (tr.Schlegel), are performed for the first time, in Prague.
Event icon
December 22, 1873: Third Carlist War: Carlists attack Republicans at Bocairente in Valencia. Despite being outnumbered, the Republicans counterattack and rout the Carlists.
Event icon
December 23, 1873: The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union is first organized in Hillsboro, Ohio. The next day, 70 women march from the Presbyterian Church to a local saloon where they pray. The movement spreads throughout Ohio over the next two months.
Performance icon
December 25, 1873: Kinder-Katechismus zu Kosels Geburtstag “Sagt mir Kinder, was blüht am Maitag” for solo voice, children’s choir, and piano by Richard Wagner (60) is performed for the first time, at Bayreuth. Wagner has it sung by children in the room next to their bedroom so Cosima can hear it when she awakes.
Event icon
December 27, 1873: Third Carlist War: A Carlist force personally led by Don Carlos lays siege to Republicans in Bilbao.
Event icon
December 27, 1873: Emmanuel Chabrier (32) marries Marie Alice Dejean, the daughter of a theatre manager.