A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1867 – December 31, 1867

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January 1, 1867: King Wilhelm of Prussia becomes chairman of the North German Confederation.
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January 1, 1867: The SS Colorado, owned by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, sails from San Francisco bound for Yokohama, thus inaugurating the first regular transpacific steamship service.
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January 1, 1867: A new suspension bridge over the Ohio River opens between Cincinnati, Ohio and Covington, Kentucky. Its central span of 322 meters is the longest in the world. (Today called the John A. Roebling Bridge, after its designer)
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January 1, 1867: God be Merciful Unto Us, an anthem for soloists, chorus, and organ by Samuel Sebastian Wesley (56), is performed for the first time, at the wedding of the composer’s friend, George Watson, in Gloucester Cathedral.
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January 7, 1867: A congressional investigation of US President Andrew Johnson begins.
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January 10, 1867: Tokugawa Yoshinobu becomes Shogun in Japan.
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January 10, 1867: General François de Castelnau receives orders to evacuate all foreign troops (France-Belgium-Austria) from Mexico.
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January 14, 1867: As a result of the work of Edvard Grieg (23) and Otto Winter-Hjelm, the Norwegian Academy of Music opens in Christiania (Oslo).
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January 14, 1867: Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres dies in Paris at the age of 87.
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January 14, 1867: Carlo Verdi, the father of Giuseppe Verdi (53) dies in Bussetto. In Paris, the composer is so depressed that he stops attending rehearsals of Don Carlos.
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January 22, 1867: King Ludwig II sends a telegram to Richard Wagner (53) announcing that he has just become engaged to his cousin Duchess Sophie Charlotte Augustine.
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January 23, 1867: The Triumph of Bacchus, an opera-ballet by Alyeksandr Sergeyevich Dargomizhsky (53) to a story after Pushkin, is performed for the first time, in the Bolshoy Theatre, Moscow. See 1 April 1846.
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January 24, 1867: Schleswig and Holstein are formally joined with Prussia.
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January 26, 1867: Hubert Parry (18) matriculates at Exeter College, Oxford.
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January 26, 1867: After defeating an Imperial army, Mexican forces enter Guanajuato.
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January 30, 1867: Emperor Komei (Osahito) of Japan dies of smallpox.
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February 1, 1867: Mexican forces overrun a French/Imperial force near San Jacinto. Afterwards, 103 French prisoners are executed for disobeying the order to leave Mexico.
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February 2, 1867: Edvard Grieg (23) is the guest conductor for the first of three concerts with the Philharmonic Society of Christiania (Oslo).
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February 3, 1867: Mutsuhito replaces Osahito as Emperor of Japan.
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February 5, 1867: French troops quit Mexico City.
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February 7, 1867: Sakhalin Island becomes a condominium of Japan and Russia.
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February 7, 1867: Friedrich Ferdinand, Baron Beust replaces Richard, Count Belcredi as Prime Minister of Austria.
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February 7, 1867: Transylvania is formally incorporated into Hungary.
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February 10, 1867: The music of Anton Bruckner (42) is heard for the first time in Vienna with a performance of the Mass in d in the Hofburgkapelle.
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February 10, 1867: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s (26) Festival Overture on the Danish National Hymn is performed for the first time, in Moscow. The work was commissioned by Nicholay Rubinstein for celebrations surrounding the marriage of the Tsarevich to the Danish princess Dagmar.
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February 11, 1867: Mehmed Emin Ali Pasha replaces Mütercim Mehmed Rüstü Pasha as Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire.
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February 11, 1867: Incidental music to Ostrovsky’s play Dmitry Samozvanets and Vasily Shuysky by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (26) is performed for the first time, in the Maliy Theatre, Moscow.
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February 12, 1867: Telegramme op.318, a waltz by Johann Strauss (41), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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February 13, 1867: Work begins in Brussels to cover the Senne River, which is presently an open sewer.
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February 13, 1867: Emperor Maximilian departs Mexico City at the head of his troops, marching northwest.
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February 15, 1867: An der schönen blauen Donau for chorus by Johann Strauss (41) to words of Weyl is performed for the first time, by 1,200 male voices in the Dianabadsaal, Vienna. It is a failure and receives mixed reviews.
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February 16, 1867: After a quarrel between Mily Balakirev (30) and opera director Bedrich Smetana (42) in Prague, the score to Russlan and Lyudmilla mysteriously vanishes, causing Balakirev to conduct the work from memory.
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February 16, 1867: A Mass in D for vocal soloists, chorus, orchestra, and organ by John Knowles Paine (28) is performed at the Singakademie Hall in Berlin, conducted by the composer, before a full house including members of the royal family. None of the Berlin choral groups would perform the work so Paine organized a chorus and rehearsed the work himself. Critics are fairly positive. See 21 July 1865.
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February 17, 1867: The Hungarian Diet is opened in Pest. Gyula, Count Andrássy de Csíkszentkirály et Krasznahorska becomes Prime Minister of Hungary.
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February 17, 1867: The first ship of any size passes through the Suez Canal, over two years before its official opening.
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February 17, 1867: Lob der Frauen op.315, a polka mazurka by Johann Strauss (41), is performed for the first time, in the Volksgarten, Vienna.
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February 17, 1867: A second child is born to Richard Wagner (53) and Cosima von Bülow at Tribschen, near Lucerne. The girl is named Eva Marie after the heroine of Die Meistersinger. On the same day, the mother’s husband, Hans von Bülow arrives at Tribschen.
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February 18, 1867: The Hungarian Constitution of 1848 is restored.
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February 18, 1867: Künstlerleben op.316, a waltz by Johann Strauss (41), is performed for the first time, in the Dianabadsaal, Vienna.
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February 20, 1867: The New England Conservatory of Music opens at the Music Hall in Boston with a faculty of 13.
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February 22, 1867: The Pullman Palace Car Company is organized by George Pullman.
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February 23, 1867: The adagio movement of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s (26) Symphony no.1 is performed for the first time, in St. Petersburg. It is paired with the scherzo movement, already premiered in 1866. See 15 February 1868.
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March 1, 1867: String Quartet D.703 “Quartettsatz” by Franz Schubert (†38) is performed publicly for the first time, by the Vienna Musikverein, 47 years after it was composed.
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March 1, 1867: Nebraska becomes the 37th state of the United States.
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March 2, 1867: The United States Congress passes the Tenure of Office Act, requiring the President to get Senate approval to remove any official which required Senate approval to appoint. Congress also adopts the First Reconstruction Act providing for military rule in the former Confederacy.
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March 5, 1867: Fenians begin abortive risings throughout Ireland.
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March 6, 1867: The Mexican army lays siege to imperialist forces personally commanded by Emperor Maximilian in Querétaro.
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March 9, 1867: President Juárez and his troops reach Puebla where they begin a siege.
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March 10, 1867: The instrumental version of the waltz An der schönen blauen Donau op.314 by Johann Strauss (41) is performed for the first time, in the Volksgarten, Vienna. Also premiered are Strauss’ polka française Postillon d’amour op.317 and the polka schnell Leichtes Blut op.319.
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March 11, 1867: Don Carlos, an opéra by Giuseppe Verdi (53) to words of Méry and DuLocle after Schiller, is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra. In attendance are Emperor Napoléon III and Empress Eugénie as well as many court and state officials and members of the diplomatic corps. It is moderately successful. Reviews are mixed.
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March 12, 1867: French troops depart Mexico from Veracruz. “Emperor” Maximilian refuses to follow, believing himself to be popular.
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March 13, 1867: Nicolae Cretulescu replaces Prince Ion Ghica as Prime Minister of Romania.
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March 14, 1867: John Knowles Paine (28) arrives in Boston from Europe. His eight months in Germany have been a triumph.
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March 14, 1867: Mexican forces begin the battle for Querétaro with probing attacks against the garrison. They are costly. The Mexicans settle in for a siege.
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March 16, 1867: Volume I of The Last Chronicle of Barset by Anthony Trollope is published.
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March 16, 1867: Joseph Lister publishes the first of a series of articles on his discovery of antiseptic surgery, in The Lancet.
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March 17, 1867: Five of the waltzes op.39 by Johannes Brahms (33) arranged for two pianos are performed for the first time, in the Redoutensaal Vienna. See 23 November 1866 and 16 November 1868.
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March 22, 1867: US President Andrew Johnson orders the release of 177 prisoners still held for their part in the 1862 Dakota Uprising.
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March 23, 1867: King Willem III of the Netherlands (Grand Duke Guillaume III of Luxembourg) accepts the offer of 5,000,000 guilder from French Emperor Napoléon III for Luxembourg.
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March 24, 1867: Jules Massenet’s (24) First Suite for Orchestra is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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March 27, 1867: By the Treaty of Ayacucho, Acre becomes part of Bolivia.
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March 27, 1867: Imperial forces make a successful attack out of Querétaro but fail to exploit their success. The gap in the siege is closed by the Mexicans.
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March 29, 1867: Queen Victoria signs the British North America Act, creating the Dominion of Canada.
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March 30, 1867: The United States purchases Alaska from Russia for $7,200,000.
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March 30, 1867: John Knowles Paine (28) participates in the Inaugural Concert of the New England Conservatory of Music. He will soon join the faculty.
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April 1, 1867: Great Britain makes the Straits Settlements a Crown Colony, taking over from the East India Company.
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April 1, 1867: Dr. Joseph Lister treats the last of eleven compound fractures using the antiseptic methods he invented. These form the basis of a series of reports he is publishing in The Lancet which will change surgery forever.
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April 1, 1867: The 40th Congress of the United States convenes in Washington. Republicans have made small increases in their overwhelming majorities in both houses of Congress.
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April 1, 1867: The first national convention of the Ku Klux Klan opens in Nashville, Tennessee.
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April 1, 1867: Emperor Napoléon III opens the Exposition Universelle in Paris. During the exposition, Édouard Manet exhibits 57 paintings including his 1859 work, The Absinthe Drinker.
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April 1, 1867: Mexicans overwhelm the Imperial defenders of Puebla before a relief column can arrive. Some units hold out for two more days before they surrender.
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April 3, 1867: Prussian Chancellor Otto von Bismarck advises King Willem III of the Netherlands not to sell Luxembourg to France, as that will necessitate war.
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April 3, 1867: La grand’ tante, an opéra comique by Jules Massenet (24) to words of Adénis and Granvallet, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Favart, Paris. It is warmly received by the audience. Reviewers find fault with the libretto.
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April 4, 1867: Two works by Camille Saint-Saëns (31) are performed for the first time, at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées conducted by the composer: Concerto for violin and orchestra no.1 op.20 and Introduction et Rondo Capriccioso for violin and orchestra op.28.
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April 7, 1867: An die Heimat op.64/1 for vocal quartet and piano by Johannes Brahms (33) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 9, 1867: The United States Senate ratifies the treaty purchasing Alaska from Russia.
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April 10, 1867: A new law in France requires all communes of over 500 people to maintain public primary schools for girls as well as boys.
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April 11, 1867: Urbano Rattazzi replaces Bettino Ricasoli, Count Brolio as Prime Minister of Italy.
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April 12, 1867: Piano Piece op.1/1 “Russian Scherzo” by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (26) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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April 12, 1867: La Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein, an opéra-bouffe by Jacques Offenbach (47) to words of Meilhac and Halévy, is performed for the first time, at the Variétés, Paris. The production takes place during the Paris Exposition Universelle so many foreign dignitaries attend. The reaction is mixed and the creators make cuts tonight producing a much more successful version.
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April 13, 1867: Excerpts from The Sapphire Necklace, an opera by Arthur Sullivan (24) to words of Chorley, are performed for the first time, at the Crystal Palace, London.
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April 16, 1867: The constitution of the North German Confederation is adopted.
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April 23, 1867: The zoetrope is patented, the first device to show moving pictures. It was invented by William E. Lincoln of Providence, Rhode Island who assigned his patent to Milton Bradley & Co. of Springfield, Massachusetts.
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April 24, 1867: The City of Genoa confers honorary citizenship on Giuseppe Verdi (53).
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April 26, 1867: After spending four months in Copiapo, Chile, Louis Moreau Gottschalk (37) boards ship making for Buenos Aires.
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April 27, 1867: Roméo et Juliette, an opéra by Charles Gounod (48) to words of Barbier and Carré after Shakespeare, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre-Lyrique, Paris. The work is a resounding success despite a state ball on the same evening.
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April 30, 1867: Louis Moreau Gottschalk (37) sails from Valparaiso making for Montevideo.
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May 7, 1867: Alfred Nobel receives a British patent for dynamite. It is a way to make nitroglycerin safe to handle and store.
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May 8, 1867: Anton Bruckner (42) enters a sanitorium in Bad Kreuzen suffering from nervous anxiety and severe depression. He will stay for three months.
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May 10, 1867: Modest Musorgsky (28) is dismissed from his position with the Russian Ministry of Communications.
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May 11, 1867: The London Conference guarantees the neutrality of Luxembourg. Prussian forces evacuate the country and the fortifications at Luxembourg City are to be dismantled.
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May 11, 1867: Cox and Box, or The Long-Lost Brothers, a comic opera by Arthur Sullivan to words of Burnand after Morton, is performed publicly for the first time, at the Adelphi Theatre, London, two days before the composer’s 25th birthday. See 26 May 1866.
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May 13, 1867: Jefferson Davis is released from imprisonment at Ft. Monroe, Virginia, after the posting of a bond by several prominent men.
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May 15, 1867: Through a betrayal, Mexican forces are allowed into Querétaro. Emperor Maximilian flees to the west.
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May 16, 1867: Emperor Maximilian and the last of his army surrender to the Mexicans west of Querétaro.
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May 18, 1867: A ship carrying Louis Moreau Gottschalk (38) docks at Punta Arenas, at the southern tip of South America.
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May 20, 1867: Queen Victoria lays the foundation stone for the Royal Albert Hall.
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May 24, 1867: Overture on Czech Themes by Mily Balakirev (30) and Fantasia on Serbian Themes by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (23) are performed for the first time. The works are given in honor of Slav visitors to the All-Russian Ethnographical Exhibition. In writing of this concert, Stasov first uses the phrase Moguchaya Kuchka (Mighty Handful) to denote the Balakirev group.
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May 24, 1867: Emperor Maximilian and two of his generals go on trial in Querétaro.
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May 25, 1867: On a ship from Valparaiso, Chile, Louis Moreau Gottschalk (38) reaches the Rio de la Plata where he will live for two years.
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May 29, 1867: The Hungarian Parliament votes 209-89-83 for a compromise with Austria. They agree to a common defense and foreign policy while each maintains its internal independence. The Hungarian monarchy is restored and the Habsburg Emperor Franz Joseph II is named King of Hungary.
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May 29, 1867: An essay by Ferdinand Hiller appears in the Kölner Zeitung describing the biography of Josephine Lang Köstlin (52). He wrote it, based on notes from Lang, in an attempt to alleviate her difficult financial situation. She has been trying to support six children since her husband’s death in 1856. It will spread her fame throughout Germany and elsewhere.
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June 3, 1867: Arthur Sullivan’s (25) overture Marmion is performed for the first time, at St. James’ Hall, London.
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June 4, 1867: Paul Mendelssohn (brother of Felix), writes to Ferdinand Hiller, inspired by his essay of 29 May. He asks if Josephine Lang Köstlin (52) will accept a gift from the royalties of Felix Mendelssohn (†19). She will, and he will send her 1,000 Thaler. Lang will receive many other smaller gifts as a result of the essay.
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June 5, 1867: Louis Berlioz, son of Hector Berlioz (63), dies of yellow fever aboard his ship, Louisiana, anchored in Havana harbor.
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June 7, 1867: Emperor Franz Joseph II invests Franz Liszt (55) with the Commander’s Cross of the Order of Franz Joseph.
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June 8, 1867: Hungarian Coronation Mass by Franz Liszt (55) is performed for the first time, in Buda for the coronation of Emperor Franz Joseph II and Empress Elisabeth as King and Queen of Hungary. Since he has not received an invitation to the coronation, the composer listens from the organ loft.
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June 8, 1867: Samuel Clemens departs New York in a large party for Europe. During the trip he will write his first book, The Innocents Abroad.
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June 11, 1867: As part of the Exposition Universelle des Beaux Arts, a jury which includes Hector Berlioz (63) awards the prize for the best cantata to Camille Saint-Saëns (31). Berlioz hurries to Saint-Saëns’ home to tell him but he is not there.
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June 11, 1867: Edvard Grieg marries his cousin, the singer Nina Hagerup, in the Johanneskirke in Copenhagen, four days before his 24th birthday. None of the parents are present.
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June 19, 1867: 0705 Archduke Maximilian of Austria, “Emperor of Mexico,” and two of his generals are executed by firing squad by Mexicans outside Querétaro.
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June 21, 1867: Mexican forces enter Mexico City after it was surrendered last night.
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June 25, 1867: Lucien B. Smith of Kent, Ohio receives a US patent for barbed wire.
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June 27, 1867: The last Imperial garrison, at Veracruz, surrenders to Mexican forces.
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June 28, 1867: Hector Berlioz (63) learns of the death of his son Louis of yellow fever aboard his ship in Havana harbor three weeks ago. Exactly how he learned is not certain but he spends the rest of the day on his bed, in silence. Early next month he will go to the Conservatoire and empty the contents of a trunk, which includes programs, press clippings and the like, and burn them.
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June 28, 1867: Prince Friedrich Günther of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt dies in Rudolstadt and is succeeded by his brother Albrecht.
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July 1, 1867: The new Código Civil (civil laws) is published in Portugal. Capital punishment is completely outlawed.
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July 1, 1867: Emperor Napoléon III of France awards Frank Chickering the ribbon of the Legion of Honor at a ceremony at the Palais de l’Industrie. The pianos of Chickering and Sons of Boston and Steinway and Sons share the gold medal at the Paris International Exhibition. In the evening, news reaches Paris of the death of Emperor Maximilian in Mexico.
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July 1, 1867: Gioachino Rossini’s (75) hymn Dieu tout puissant to words of Pacini is performed for the first time, at the Palais de l’Industrie, Paris. Emperor Napoléon III and Empress Eugènie are present along with Ottoman Sultan Abdülaziz I and other royalty and nobility. The production includes 800 players and 400 singers. Critics are divided.
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July 1, 1867: The British North America Act goes into effect, joining the Province of Canada (Ontario and Quebec), New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia in the Dominion of Canada. The Governor-General at the time of confederation is Charles Stanley Monck. The first Prime Minister of Canada is John Alexander Macdonald.
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July 5, 1867: Modest Musorgsky (28) completes St. John’s Night on Bald Mountain on St. John’s Eve at Minkino Farm in the Luga District.
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July 6, 1867: Volume II of The Last Chronicle of Barset by Anthony Trollope is published.
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July 9, 1867: La permission de dix heures, an opéra-comique by Jacques Offenbach (48) to words of Mélesville (pseud. of Duveyrier), is performed for the first time, at Bad Ems.
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July 15, 1867: The Siamese envoy in Paris signs a treaty acknowledging a French protectorate over Cambodia.
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July 15, 1867: President Benito Juárez enters Mexico City in triumph after the defeat of the French and their imperialist allies.
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July 16, 1867: French gardener Joseph Monier receives a French patent for reinforced concrete.
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July 20, 1867: La leçon de chant électromagnétique, a bouffonnerie musicale by Jacques Offenbach (48) to words of Bourget, is performed for the first time, at Bad Ems.
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July 21, 1867: Antonio Barezzi, first benefactor and father-in-law to Giuseppe Verdi (53) dies in Busetto, attended by Verdi and his second wife, Giuseppina.
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July 26, 1867: The Governor-Generalship of Turkestan is formed by Russia.
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July 27, 1867: 05:00 Pantaleón Enrique Joaquín Granados y Campiña is born in carrer del Marqués de Tallada, 1, Lleida (Lérida), Kingdom of Spain, 130 km west of Barcelona, the third of five children born to Calixto José de la Trinidad Granados y Armenteros, a captain in the Spanish army, and Enriqueta Elvira Campiña, the daughter of a prominent businessman.
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July 28, 1867: Anton Rubinstein (37), in Baden-Baden, sends the Vice-President of the Russian Musical Society the news that he will not return as director of the St. Petersburg Conservatory.
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July 28, 1867: Arthur Sullivan (25) and Rachel Scott Russell announce their intention to marry, to the great dismay of her mother. Sullivan is banned from the house.
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July 29, 1867: A month after learning of the death of his son, Hector Berlioz (63) prepares his will.
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July 29, 1867: Two days after his birth, Pantaleón Enrique Joaquín Granados y Campiña is baptized in the main Cathedral of Lleida (Lérida), 130 km west of Barcelona.
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July 30, 1867: Figaro-Polka op.320 by Johann Strauss (41) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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August 1, 1867: The fourth and last incarnation of Richard Wagner’s (54) grosse romantische Oper Tannhäuser und der Sängerkrieg auf Wartberg to his own words is performed for the first time, in the Königliches Hof-und Nationaltheater, Munich. See 19 October 1845, 1 August 1847, and 13 March 1861.
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August 6, 1867: Cheyenne Indians destroy a Union Pacific train near Plum Creek Station (near present Lexington, Nebraska).  Seven people are killed.
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August 8, 1867: Anton Bruckner (42) leaves the sanitorium at Bad Kreuzen, apparently restored to health.
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August 13, 1867: Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (23) writes to Mily Balakirev (30) describing a scale he has used in his current tone poem, Sadko. It is the first reference to an octatonic scale in Russian music.
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August 15, 1867: The façade of the new Paris Opéra is unveiled.
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August 15, 1867: The Second Reform Act receives royal assent from Queen Victoria. It doubles the electorate by enfranchising all men who are heads of households.
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August 15, 1867: Paix et Liberté, a cantata by Jules Massenet (25), is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre-Lyrique for the birthday of Napoléon I.
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August 24, 1867: Railway service through the Brenner Pass is inaugurated.
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August 25, 1867: Michael Faraday dies at Hampton Court at the age of 76.
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August 26, 1867: Greece and Serbia conclude an alliance against Turkey.
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August 28, 1867: Under instructions from the United States Navy, Captain William Reynolds of the USS Lackawanna lands on the Midway Islands and occupies them for the US.
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August 28, 1867: Umberto Menotti Maria Giordano is born in a house in Via della Pescaria, Foggia, Kingdom of Italy, the son of a Ludovico Giordano, a pharmacist, and Sabata Scognamillo.
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August 31, 1867: August Bebel becomes the first socialist elected to the North German Reichstag.
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August 31, 1867: Charles Baudelaire dies in Paris at the age of 46.
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September 1, 1867: Les noces de Prométhée op.19, a cantata for solo voices and orchestra by Camille Saint-Saëns (31) to words of Cornut, is performed for the first time, at the Cirque de l’Impératrice (Cirque d'été), Paris.
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September 5, 1867: Amy Marcy Cheney (Beach) is born at 102 Western Avenue in Henniker, New Hampshire, USA, the only child of Charles Abbott Cheney, a paper manufacturer and Clara Imogene Marcy, amateur singer and pianist.
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September 14, 1867: Peter Cornelius (42) marries Bertha Jung in Mainz.
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September 16, 1867: Cosima von Bülow, with her children, leaves Richard Wagner (54) in Tribschen and returns to her husband Hans in Munich.
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September 18, 1867: About 40 armed Fenians attack a prison van in Manchester and release two of their comrades. In the melee, a policeman is killed.
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September 20, 1867: Six weeks of voting for Canada’s first Parliament conclude. The Conservatives and their allies win 100 seats while 62 go to the Liberals. 18 seats are won by candidates opposed to confederation.
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September 22, 1867: Mily Balakirev (30) agrees to conduct concerts for the Russian Musical Society in St. Petersburg provided that he is allowed to program them. At the insistence of Balakirev, the Board of Directors agrees to ask Hector Berlioz (63) to co-direct.
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September 24, 1867: The Süddeutsche Presse is established in Munich with government funds by friends of Richard Wagner (54). Wagner begins a weekly series entitled “German Art and German Politics.”
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September 26, 1867: Arthur Sullivan (25) and George Grove depart London for Vienna to search for lost manuscripts of Franz Schubert (†38). They will be successful.
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September 27, 1867: Felipe Pedrell (26) marries Carmen Domingo.
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October 1, 1867: The County of Hanau is attached to Prussia.
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October 1, 1867: Volume I of Das Kapital by Karl Marx is published in Hamburg.
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October 1, 1867: Hesse-Homburg is incorporated into Prussia.
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October 5, 1867: Arthur Sullivan (25) and George Grove arrive in Vienna in search of the lost music to Franz Schubert’s (†38) Rosamunde.
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October 7, 1867: Festival-Quadrille op.341 by Johann Strauss (41) is performed for the first time, in Covent Garden, London.
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October 7, 1867: At Hohenschwangau, King Ludwig II of Bavaria writes to his cousin Duchess Sophie Charlotte Augustine severing their engagement.
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October 9, 1867: Franz Liszt (55) arrives at Tribschen to discuss Richard Wagner’s (54) relationship with his daughter Cosima von Bülow. They talk for six hours. Later, they discuss Die Meistersinger, which Liszt sight-reads from the orchestral score while Wagner sings the vocal parts. Liszt calls it a masterpiece. They will not see each other again for five years.
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October 12, 1867: Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (23) writes to Modest Musorgsky (28) shortly after finishing Sadko. He thanks Musorgsky for giving him the original idea.
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October 13, 1867: Erasmus Jacobs, a 15-year-old farm boy living near Hopetown on the Orange River, picks up a rock and shows it to his mother. It will prove to be a 21.25 carat diamond (the Eureka Diamond) and will begin the exploitation of diamonds along the Vaal and Orange Rivers.
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October 18, 1867: The formal transfer of Alaska from Russia to the United States takes place in Sitka.
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October 18, 1867: Louis Moreau Gottschalk (38) departs Montevideo for Buenos Aires.
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October 22, 1867: Garibaldi marches on Rome in an attempt to attach the Papal States to Italy.
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October 24, 1867: Richard Wagner (54) completes Die Meistersinger at Tribschen.
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October 27, 1867: Federico Luigi, Count Menabrea replaces Urbano Rattazzi as Prime Minister of Italy.
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October 28, 1867: French troops arrive at Civitavecchia to protect the Papal States from Garibaldi.
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October 29, 1867: The British packet RMS Rhone goes down in a hurricane in the British Virgin Islands. 123 of the 146 on board are lost.
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October 31, 1867: Mily Balakirev (30) conducts his first concert as director of the Russian Musical Society in St. Petersburg.
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November 1, 1867: All restrictions on Jews’ right of residence, buying property, or profession are abolished by the states of the North German Federation.
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November 3, 1867: At Mentana, 20 km northeast of Rome, French and Papal forces defeat Garibaldist irregulars seeking to join the Papal States to Italy. Garibaldi is captured and sent to Caprera.
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November 3, 1867: War of the Triple Alliance: Paraguayans attack the allied army at Tuyutí for a second time. They make great progress against the Brazilians, inflicting casualties and destroying materiel. But Brazilian and Argentine counterattacks force them back.
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November 5, 1867: Former Prime Minister Leopoldo O'Donnell Jorris, duque de Tetuán dies in Biarritz. His Liberal Union coalition of Moderates and Progressives begins to come apart.
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November 5, 1867: Louis Moreau Gottschalk (38) plays his first concert in Buenos Aires.
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November 6, 1867: The first Parliament for Canada convenes in Ottawa.
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November 9, 1867: The Leipzig music publishing house of CF Peters issues the first two numbers of Edition Peters, to print editions of older music. They are Books I and II of The Well-Tempered Klavier.
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November 12, 1867: Hector Berlioz (63) leaves Paris for Russia.
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November 12, 1867: Valse, ou Pas de fleurs, a divertissement by Léo Delibes (31), is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra.
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November 14, 1867: Henrik Ibsen’s dramatic poem Peer Gynt is published in Copenhagen. It will not be produced on the stage until 1876.
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November 15, 1867: Jovan Ristic replaces Ilija Garasanin as Prime Minister of Serbia.
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November 15, 1867: A stock ticker is used for the first time, at the New York Stock Exchange. It was invented by Edward Calahan.
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November 16, 1867: At a faculty meeting at the University of Vienna, the request of Anton Bruckner (43) that a position in musical composition be created is denied.
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November 16, 1867: Violin Sonata no.2 op.13 by Edvard Grieg (24) is performed for the first time, at the Christiania (Oslo) Music Academy, the composer at the keyboard. Also premiered are Grieg’s two songs for male choir, Evening Mood and The Bear-Hunter to words of Moe.
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November 17, 1867: Hector Berlioz (63) arrives in St. Petersburg to conduct a series of concerts.
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November 18, 1867: The Bogatirs, an opera by Alyeksandr Borodin (34) to words of Krilov, is performed for the first time, at the Bolshoy Theatre, Moscow. Negative criticism and lack of understanding on the part of the public limits the work to one performance.
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November 19, 1867: Tokugawa Yoshinobu resigns as Shogun in Japan, effectively ending the Shogunate.
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November 23, 1867: Three Fenians are hanged at Salford Jail for their part in the killing of a policeman on 18 September, before a crowd of at least 8,000. They become known as the Manchester Martyrs.
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November 23, 1867: Ballades op.10/1&4 for piano by Johannes Brahms (34) are performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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November 23, 1867: Robinson Crusoé, an opéra-comique by Jacques Offenbach (48) to words of Cormon and Crémieux after Defoe, is performed for the first time, at the Opéra-Comique, Paris.
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November 26, 1867: Stefan Golescu replaces Nicolae Cretulescu as Prime Minister of Romania.
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November 27, 1867: Charles Louis Eugène Koechlin is born in Paris, French Empire, the seventh child of Jules Koechlin, a textile designer, and Camille Dollfus, daughter of a textile manufacturer.
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November 27, 1867: Marschieren op.41/4 for unaccompanied chorus by Johannes Brahms (34) to words of Lemcke is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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November 28, 1867: Hector Berlioz (63) conducts the first of six concerts he will give with the Russian Musical Society. The Frenchman is treated royally during his stay.
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December 1, 1867: Three movements from Ein deutsches Requiem by Johannes Brahms (34) are performed for the first time, in the Großer Redoutensaal, Vienna. See 18 February 1869. The performance is less than perfect and a few hisses are heard but the composer is loudly applauded and called on stage.
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December 1, 1867: Louis Moreau Gottschalk (38) premieres his Souvenir de Buenos Aires for piano in Teatro Colón, Buenos Aires.
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December 2, 1867: The box office opens to sell tickets to Charles Dickens’ first public reading in New York. As it does, the vendors are confronted by a double line, extending over 1.5 km.
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December 3, 1867: Nikola Ristic replaces Jovan Ristic as Prime Minister of Serbia.
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December 5, 1867: Francesco Maria Piave, librettist of Ernani, Rigoletto, La Traviata, Simon Boccanegra, and a host of others, suffers a stroke in Milan. He will linger, paralyzed but alert, for eight years until his death on 5 March 1876. Giuseppe Verdi (54) will provide for him and his illegitimate daughter.
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December 7, 1867: Liebe kam aus fernen Landen op.33/4, a song by Johannes Brahms (34) to words of Tieck, is performed for the first time, in Leipzig.
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December 12, 1867: Upon Rikard Nordraak’s Death: Tone Poem for Orchestra by Edvard Grieg (24) is performed for the first time, in Christiania (Oslo), conducted by the composer.
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December 13, 1867: Fenians attempt to rescue one of their leaders by blowing a hole in a wall of Clerkenwell Prison. The explosives do their job well enough but they also destroy a row of tenements across the street. Twelve people are killed, more than 50 injured.
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December 13, 1867: Malbrough s’en va-t-en guerre, an opérette by Georges Bizet (31), Léo Delibes (31), Émile Jonas, and Isidore Legouix to words of Siraudin, Williams, and Busnach, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de l’Athénée, Paris.
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December 18, 1867: The Contrabandista, or the Law of the Ladrones, an operetta by Arthur Sullivan (25) to words of Burnand, is performed for the first time, at St. George’s Hall, London.
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December 19, 1867: King Ludwig of Bavaria orders the cessation of a series of articles by Richard Wagner (54) entitled “German Art and German Politics.” The cause for the censorship is unknown, but the articles are anti-French and favor German nationalism.
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December 21, 1867: A constitution for Austria-Hungary is promulgated, embodying the concept of dual monarchy. It guarantees “complete freedom of religion and conscience for all.”
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December 21, 1867: Sadko op.5 for orchestra by Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (23) is performed for the first time, by the Russian Musical Society, St. Petersburg, conducted by Mily Balakirev (30).
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December 21, 1867: Wehe, so willst du mich wieder op.32/5, a song by Johannes Brahms (34) to words of Platen, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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December 23, 1867: Richard Wagner (54) returns to Munich from Tribschen and stays for six weeks.
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December 24, 1867: Edvard Grieg (24) and his wife spend Christmas Eve in Christiania (Oslo) with the great author and poet Bjørnsterne Bjørnson. He brings the first volume of his Lyric Pieces op.12 as a present and plays some of them for him. Bjørnson is so taken by the last one he resolves to write words for it. This will happen within two days.
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December 26, 1867: La jolie fille de Perth, an opéra by Georges Bizet (29) to words of Saint Georges and Adénis after Scott, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre-Lyrique, Paris. The work is afforded an excellent reception and the press begin to take Bizet seriously, but the production is a financial failure.
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December 30, 1867: Karl, Prince Auersperg is named Chancellor of Austria.