A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1862 – December 31, 1862

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January 5, 1862: Bedrich Smetana’s (37) symphonic poem Richard III is performed for the first time in its orchestrated setting, in Prague. See 24 April 1860.
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January 5, 1862: Chilean authorities arrest Antoine Orllie de Tounens, a Frenchman who has proclaimed himself King Orllie-Antoine I of Araucania (present Chile south of the Bio-Bio River). This will lead to the incorporation of Araucania into Chile.
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January 6, 1862: British ships join French in the port of Veracruz. They plan to force President Juárez to resume payments owed to them by Mexico.
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January 11, 1862: Monsieur et Madame Denis, an opéra-comique by Jacques Offenbach (42) to words of Laurencin (pseud. of Chapelle) and Delaporte, is performed for the first time, at the Bouffes-Parisiens, Paris.
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January 13, 1862: Scenes from Goethe’s Faust for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Robert Schumann (†5) to words of Goethe is performed completely for the first time, in Cologne. See 29 August 1862.
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January 14, 1862: La Demoiselle de Nanterre, a vaudeville by Jacques Offenbach (42) to words of Grangé and Lambert-Thiboust, is performed for the first time, in the Palais-Royal, Paris.
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January 16, 1862: An accident at the Hartley Colliery in Northumberland, England kills 204 people.
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January 17, 1862: Concerto for piano and orchestra no.1 op.17 by Camille Saint-Saëns (26) is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris, the composer at the keyboard.
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January 17, 1862: After reporting to the American Embassy in Havana, formally renouncing his allegiance to his home state of Louisiana and declaring his fidelity to the United States, Louis Moreau Gottschalk (32) boards ship for New York.
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January 18, 1862: Bishop Laurence of Tarbes, on authority of Pope Pius IX, proclaims that the visions recently reported by Bernadette Soubirous at Lourdes were in fact the Virgin Mary.
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January 26, 1862: Jacques Offenbach (42) writes to the Duc de Morney that he is giving up management of the Bouffes-Parisiens.
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January 28, 1862: Die ersten Curen op.261, a waltz by Johann Strauss (36), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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January 29, 1862: Concurrenzen op.267, a waltz by Johann Strauss (36), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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January 29, 1862: Fritz (Frederick) Theodor Albert Delius is born at 6 Claremont in Bradford, Yorkshire, United Kingdom, fourth of 14 children born to Julius Friedrich Wilhelm Delius, a wool merchant, and Elise Pauline Krönig, a descendant of Swedish royalty.
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January 30, 1862: The Federal ironclad USS Monitor is launched at Greenpoint, Long Island.
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January 31, 1862: Lens grinder and amateur astronomer Alvan Graham Clark of Cambridge, Massachusetts tests a new 46 cm lens by pointing it towards Sirius. He notices a tiny spot of light near Sirius and thus discovers a new class of heavenly body, the white dwarf.
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January 31, 1862: The British government creates Lower Burma through the joining together of Arakan, Tenasserim, and Pegu. It is subject to India.
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February 1, 1862: Johann Rudolf Thorbecke replaces Julius Philipp Jacob Adriaan, Count van Zuylen van Nijevelt as chief minister of the Netherlands.
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February 1, 1862: Its autonomy terminated, Sicily is formally integrated into Italy.
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February 1, 1862: Fathers and Sons by Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenyev is published.
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February 1, 1862: The words to The Battle Hymn of the Republic by Julia Ward Howe are published in the February issue of the Atlantic Monthly.
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February 4, 1862: Colonnen op.262, a waltz by Johann Strauss (36), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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February 5, 1862: Pursuant to the decree of last 23 December, Moldavia and Wallachia are joined to form the Principaliaty of Romania with Bucharest as its capital.
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February 5, 1862: Richard Wagner (48) reads Die Meistersinger to a large crowd in Mainz.
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February 6, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces surrender Fort Henry on the Tennessee River.
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February 8, 1862: US Civil War: Federal forces take Roanoke Island, North Carolina.
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February 10, 1862: Motoren op.265, a waltz by Johann Strauss (36), is performed for the first time, in the Sophiensaal, Vienna.
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February 11, 1862: On the ninth anniversary of his New York debut, Louis Moreau Gottschalk (32) gives his first public concert in the city in five years, at Niblo’s Saloon.
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February 13, 1862: The garrison at Nafplio revolts against King Othon of Greece. Loyal troops confine the revolt to the city.
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February 15, 1862: Barbu Catargiu replaces Alexandru Moruzi as Prime Minister of Romania.
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February 15, 1862: Richard Wagner (48) takes up residence at Rheingaustrasse 137 in Biebrich (now Wiesbaden).
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February 16, 1862: US Civil War: 12,000 Confederates in Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River surrender after fighting which costs 4,300 total casualties. Federals now control significant portions of the Cumberland and Tennessee Rivers.
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February 17, 1862: The premiere of La forza del destino having been postponed, Giuseppe Verdi (48) and his wife depart St. Petersburg for Moscow and thence to Paris.
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February 18, 1862: US Civil War: The First Congress of the Confederate States of America meets in Richmond.
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February 19, 1862: In the Soledad Agreement, signed today in Veracruz, France, Great Britain, and Spain agree to recognize the Mexican government of Benito Juárez, discuss debts owed to them by Mexico, and to limit their troops to Tehuacán, Córdoba, and Orizaba. France will fail to ratify the agreement.
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February 21, 1862: Minna Wagner shows up unexpectedly at Richard Wagner’s (48) residence in Biebrich. He describes what follows as “ten days in hell.” He wants a divorce but can not suggest it because of her bad health. They decide on a separation. She will move to Dresden.
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February 22, 1862: Jefferson Davis is inaugurated as the permanent President of the Confederate States of America.
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February 22, 1862: L’Union op.48, a fantasy on Yankee Doodle, Hail Columbia, and The Star-Spangled Banner for piano by Louis Moreau Gottschalk (32), is performed for the first time, in New York by the composer. The work stirs the crowd into a patriotic frenzy.
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February 23, 1862: Franz Schubert’s (†33) String Quartet D.112 is performed for the first time, by the Vienna Musikverein, 48 years after it was composed.
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February 24, 1862: Studenten-Polka op.263 and the waltz Patronessen op.264 by Johann Strauss (36) are performed for the first time, in the Redoutensaal, Vienna.
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February 25, 1862: French troops begin moving inland from Veracruz.
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February 25, 1862: US President Lincoln signs the Legal Tender Act, authorizing the printing of regular paper currency for the first time.
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February 25, 1862: US Civil War: Federal troops occupy Nashville, Tennessee.
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February 26, 1862: Lucifer-Polka op.266 by Johann Strauss (36) is performed for the first time, in the Dianabadsaal, Vienna.
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February 28, 1862: La reine de Saba, an opéra by Charles Gounod (43) to words of Barbier and Carré after Nerval, is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra before the Emperor and Empress. Initially successful with the audience, the work is attacked by the critics.
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March 3, 1862: Wiener Chronik op.268, a waltz by Johann Strauss (36), is performed for the first time, in the Dianabadsaal, Vienna.
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March 4, 1862: Urbano Rattazzi replaces Bettino Ricasoli, Count Brolio as Prime Minister of Italy.
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March 4, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces occupy Santa Fe in the New Mexico Territory.
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March 5, 1862: The Colony of Lagos is created by Great Britain.
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March 8, 1862: Un ballo in maschera op.272, a quadrille by Johann Strauss (36), is performed for the first time, in Pavlovsk.
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March 8, 1862: US Civil War: The confederate ironclad CSS Virginia steams out of Hampton Roads, Virginia, sinks two Federal warships and runs three others aground.

Federal troops occupy Chatanooga and Knoxville, Tennessee as well as Leesburg, Virginia.

At Pea Ridge Arkansas, Federal troops defeat Confederates and Indians in the largest battle of the war west of the Mississippi River. 2,200 total casualties result and the rebels are forced to evacuate Arkansas.

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March 9, 1862: US Civil War: The Confederate ironclad Virginia meets the Federal ironclad Monitor off Hampton Roads, Virginia. Neither gains an advantage but the Virginia is badly damaged and the face of naval warfare is changed forever.
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March 10, 1862: Great Britain and France recognize the independence of Zanzibar.
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March 10, 1862: Pursuant to the Legal Tender Act of 25 February, paper currency enters circulation in the United States.
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March 11, 1862: France acquires the port of Obock (Djibouti) but will not occupy it until 1883.
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March 14, 1862: US Civil War: Federal troops take New Madrid, Missouri.
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March 17, 1862: Anton Rubinstein (32) is named director of the new St. Petersburg Conservatory.
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March 17, 1862: Adolf, Prince Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen replaces Karl Anton, Prince von Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen as Prime Minister of Prussia.
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March 17, 1862: The faculty of Harvard University vote to hire John Knowles Paine (23) as organist and music instructor.
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March 17, 1862: About 15:00. Jacques-François-Fromental-Elie Halévy dies at Villa Mascet in the rue de France, Nice, Alpes-Maritimes in the French Empire, aged 62 years, nine months, and 18 days.
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March 21, 1862: James Bruce, Earl of Elgin replaces Charles John Canning, Earl Canning as Viceroy of India.
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March 22, 1862: Le voyage de MM. Dunanan père et fils, an opéra-bouffe by Jacques Offenbach (42) to words of Siraudin and Moinaux, is performed for the first time, at the Bouffes-Parisiens, Paris.
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March 22, 1862: US Civil War: The Confederates’ Shenandoah Valley campaign begins with an attack on Kernstown, Virginia.
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March 24, 1862: A funeral procession in memory of Fromental Halévy travels from the Institute Palace to the Place de la Concorde to the cemetery of Montmartre. An estimated 15,000 people attend some part of the proceedings. Music includes the Marche funèbre from La Juive. There are eight funeral orations.
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March 25, 1862: Richard Wagner (48) in Biebrich writes a letter to King Johann of Saxony, pleading for amnesty on account of his need to have access to the Dresden theatre and because of the ill-health of his wife.
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March 28, 1862: Richard Wagner (48) is pardoned by King Johann of Saxony and allowed to reenter the country after an exile of 13 years.
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March 30, 1862: The Free School of Music opens in St. Petersburg in opposition to the official conservatory. Leaders are Director Gavril Lomakin and Assistant Director Mily Balakirev (25).
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April 3, 1862: Les Miserables by Victor Hugo is published.
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April 4, 1862: Three songs by Johannes Brahms (28) are performed for the first time, in Hamburg: Vor dem Fenster op.14/1 and Ein Sonnett op.14/4, to anonymous words, and Keinen hat es noch gereut op.33/1 to words of Tieck.
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April 5, 1862: A performance of Arthur Sullivan’s (19) incidental music to The Tempest at the Crystal Palace wins universal approval and catapults Sullivan into the public consciousness. “It is no exaggeration to say that I woke up the next morning and found myself famous.” See 6 April 1861.
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April 6, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces attack Federals at Shiloh Church near Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, 150 km east of Memphis, making modest gains, but their commander, Albert S. Johnston, is killed.
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April 7, 1862: Representatives of Great Britain and the United States conclude a treaty in Washington, agreeing to join forces to suppress the slave trade.
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April 7, 1862: US Civil War: Federal troops counterattack at Shiloh Church and the Confederates are forced to withdraw. The battle has cost 23,746 total casualties.
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April 8, 1862: John D. Lynde of Philadelphia receives a US patent for the first aerosol dispenser.
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April 9, 1862: The final conference of the occupying powers taking place at Orizaba concludes. Spain and Great Britain decide to end their intervention in Mexico. Only France remains.
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April 11, 1862: US Civil War: Union troops take Huntsville, Alabama.
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April 12, 1862: The post of permanent secretary at the Institute, made vacant by the death of Halévy last month, is granted to Charles-Ernest Beulé by a vote of 19-14 over Hector Berlioz (58).
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April 12, 1862: Edvard Grieg (18) performs his final examination concert for Leipzig Conservatory at the Gewandhaus. Among other things, he plays nos.1, 2, and 4 from his Four Piano Pieces op.1.
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April 13, 1862: When Giacomo Meyerbeer (70) hears from Arrigo Boito (20) that Giuseppe Verdi (48) will be traveling to London to produce his piece for the exhibition, he decides to do the same.
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April 16, 1862: US President Lincoln signs into law a bill outlawing slavery in the District of Columbia.
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April 16, 1862: President Jefferson Davis signs a preliminary conscription law.
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April 19, 1862: While the laboratory in Pisa (where he is working) is closed for the Easter holidays, Alyeksandr Borodin (28) and his fiancee spend five days in Florence taking in art, theatre, and music.
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April 20, 1862: Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (18) graduates from the College of Naval Cadets, St. Petersburg with the rank of midshipman.
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April 20, 1862: Giuseppe Verdi (48) arrives in London to produce Inno della nazioni at the London Exhibition.
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April 20, 1862: Giacomo Meyerbeer (70) departs Berlin for London where he will produce his occasional work for the exhibition.
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April 20, 1862: At a meeting of the French Academy of Sciences, Louis Pasteur and Claude Bernard open jars of dog’s blood and urine they have kept sealed for 50 days at 30° C. They find no putrefaction or fermentation, thus proving that heating foods will destroy bacteria.
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April 23, 1862: Giacomo Meyerbeer (70) arrives in London from Berlin.
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April 24, 1862: US Civil War: United States naval forces rush past the Confederate fortifications down river from New Orleans.
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April 24, 1862: In The Times of London an indignant letter from Giuseppe Verdi (48) appears. He complains that his Inno delle nazioni, composed on commission from the organizers of the London Exhibition, has been rejected for performance.
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April 25, 1862: US Civil War: As Federal ships anchor at New Orleans, the population sets the waterfront afire.
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April 29, 1862: US Civil War: The city of New Orleans formally surrenders to United States troops.
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April 29, 1862: Camille Saint-Saëns (26), Georges Schmitt, César Franck (39), Alexander Guilmant, and August Bazille inaugurate the new Cavaillé-Coll organ in the Church of Saint-Sulpice, Paris.
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May 1, 1862: Fest-Ouvertüre im Marschstyl for orchestra by Giacomo Meyerbeer (70) is performed for the first time, at the opening of the London World Exhibition before Queen Victoria and other royals and notables.
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May 1, 1862: Anton Bruckner’s (37) cantata for the laying of the foundation stone for the new Linz Cathdedral, Preiset denn Herrn, to words of Pammesberger, is performed for the first time.
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May 2, 1862: After three months in the city, Bedrich Smetana (38) gives his last concert in Göteborg.  He will soon return to Prague.
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May 4, 1862: US Civil War: Federal troops capture Yorktown, Virginia without a fight.
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May 5, 1862: Mexican forces defeat the French and Mexican conservative collaborationsists at Puebla. The day is celebrated as a national holiday (Cinco de Mayo).
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May 5, 1862: US Civil War: Fighting at Williamsburg, Virginia results in greater losses for the Federals although Confederates are forced to retreat.
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May 6, 1862: Henry David Thoreau dies peacefully in Concord, Massachusetts at the age of 44.
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May 8, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate troops defeat Federals at McDowell, Virginia.
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May 10, 1862: US Civil War: United States troops occupy Norfolk and Portsmouth, Virginia.
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May 11, 1862: US Civil War: When Federal forces capture Norfolk, the base of CSS Virginia, the Confederates scuttle the ship.
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May 12, 1862: The Crown Colony of British Honduras (Belize) is created.
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May 12, 1862: US Civil War: Union troops occupy Natchez, Mississippi.
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May 13, 1862: Charles Villiers Stanford (9) gives a solo piano and violin recital at Herbert Street, Dublin.
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May 14, 1862: Adolphe Nicole of Switzerland, currently working in London, receives a British patent for a chronograph (stopwatch). Although stopwatches have existed since the 1820s, this is the first to have a reset device.
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May 15, 1862: In spite of official British neutrality, the confederate ship Alabama is launched from the Liverpool shipyard where it was built.
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May 16, 1862: General Benjamin Butler, the military commander of New Orleans, decrees that any woman acting disrespectfully towards the United States or its representatives “shall be regarded as a woman of the town plying her avocation.”
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May 17, 1862: Jules Massenet (20) and his competitors enter the cubicles for the Prix de Rome competition.
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May 18, 1862: The French and their conservative allies defeat Mexicans at Barranca Seca.
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May 20, 1862: President Lincoln signs the Homestead Act granting 65 hectares of free public land to anyone who works it for five years.
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May 21, 1862: Shortly after receiving his diploma from the Leipzig Conservatory, Edvard Grieg (18) gives his first public concert in Norway, at the Labor Union hall in Bergen. Among other things he plays three of his piano pieces op.1. The songs The Maid of the Mill op.2/1 and What Shall I Say? op.2/4, both to words of von Chamisso, and Ich denke Dein EG 302 to words of Goethe, are performed for the first time. His String Quartet in d minor is played for the first and last time. The response is good.
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May 24, 1862: Westminster Bridge, designed by Thomas Page, opens to traffic in London.
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May 24, 1862: After being refused a presentation at the Exhibition of 1862, Inno delle nazioni for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Giuseppe Verdi (48) to words of Boito (20), is performed for the first time, at Her Majesty’s Theatre, London.
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May 28, 1862: To commemorate the life of Fromental Halévy (†0), a gala performance of La Juive is given at the Paris Opéra. At the end of the second act, the curtain is raised revealing a bust of the composer donated by his wife. The five leads take laurels off their heads and place them on the bust, as others rain down on the stage. There follows a ten-minute standing ovation.
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May 29, 1862: Giacomo Meyerbeer (70) returns to Berlin from London.
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May 30, 1862: US Civil War: Federal forces occupy Corinth, Mississippi. 2,000 rebels are taken prisoner.
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May 31, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces attack Federals at Fair Oaks and Seven Pines on the south side of the Chickahominy River just east of Richmond. The two-day battle will end in a muddled draw with 11,165 total casualties.
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June 5, 1862: French naval forces compel the Emperor of Annam to cede three provinces to France and rights of passage on the River Mekong, in the Treaty of Saigon.
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June 6, 1862: US Civil War: Federal ironclads destroy seven of eight Confederate vessels at Memphis. At noon, the city surrenders.
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June 7, 1862: Gennaios Theodorou Kolokotronis replaces Athanasios Andreou Miaoulis as Prime Minister of Greece.
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June 13, 1862: A rehearsal of Béatrice et Bénédict at the apartment of Hector Berlioz (58) in Paris is interrupted by a telegram informing the composer that his wife, Marie-Genevieve Recio Berlioz, has suffered a heart attack while visiting friends in St.-Germain-en-Laye. He immediately leaves to attend her but by the time he arrives she is dead.
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June 14, 1862: Emperor Napoléon III signs a decree ordering a pension for the widow of Fromental Halévy (†0).
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June 15, 1862: At a public event in Belgrade, a Serbian youth is killed by a Turkish officer. Serbian police who intervene are shot and killed by Turkish soldiers. Massed Serbians thereupon attack Turkish troops and force them into the citadel.
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June 16, 1862: Turkish troops in the citadel of Belgrade open fire with artillery and bombard the city for five hours.
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June 19, 1862: President Lincoln signs a law prohibiting slavery in American territories.
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June 20, 1862: Prime Minister Barbu Catargiu of Romania is shot and killed at close range outside the Parliament building in Bucharest. He is replaced ad interim by Apostol Arsache. The murderer will never be brought to justice.
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June 24, 1862: US Civil War: Newly appointed Confederate commander Robert E. Lee initiates the Seven Days battle at Mechanicsville, Virginia just north of Richmond. They make little progress.
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June 25, 1862: US Civil War: Confederates resume the attack and break the Federal line at Mechanicsville but do not exploit the advantage. Union troops withdraw to the James River.
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June 27, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces break through the Union lines at Gaines’ Mills, Virginia, forcing the northerners back to Harrison’s Landing. The fighting results in 15,587 total casualties. The rebels relieve pressure on Richmond but can not exploit their advantage.

Union forces begin bombarding Vicksburg, Mississippi.

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June 28, 1862: US Civil War: Federal ships force their way past rebel shore batteries at Vicksburg.
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June 29, 1862: US Civil War: As southern forces attack across the Chickahominy River, Federal troops withdraw to safety leaving 2,500 sick and wounded behind.
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June 30, 1862: US Civil War: Federal troops defeat the Confederates at White Oak Swamp, allowing them to assume positions on Malvern Hill, north of the James River.
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July 1, 1862: The Russian State Library is founded in Moscow.
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July 1, 1862: President Lincoln signs into law a federal income tax and the Bureau of Internal Revenue. He also signs the Pacific Railway Act. It provides support from the federal government for the building of a transcontinental railroad.
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July 1, 1862: US Civil War: The series of battles known as the Seven Days concludes as Confederates attack retreating Federals at Malvern Hill, southeast of Richmond. They are repulsed at murderous cost. The week has seen 5,212 people killed, 24,323 wounded, 6,928 missing.
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July 2, 1862: US President Lincoln signs the Morrill Act. It gives each state 30,000 acres (12,150 ha.) of public land for each Senator and Representative from that state. The sale of the land will go to support higher education in the states.
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July 4, 1862: During a picnic along the Thames, Rev. Charles Dodgson first invents a story about a girl named Alice and her adventures down a rabbit hole, for three young girls accompanying him. He will later publish Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll.
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July 6, 1862: Nicolae Cretulescu replaces Apostol Arsache as Prime Minister of Romania.
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July 11, 1862: Bavard et Bavarde (later called Les Bavards ), an opéra-comique by Jacques Offenbach (42) to words of Nuitter after Cervantes, is performed for the first time, at Bad Ems.
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July 12, 1862: Edvard Grieg (19) petitions King Karl IV for a stipend to travel and study. It will be denied.
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July 13, 1862: Bedrich Smetana (38) conducts his first performance as chorus master of the Hlahol Choral Society, Prague.
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July 16, 1862: Today begins a two-day battle between 300 United States troops and 500 Apaches in Cochise County, Arizona. The Apaches withdraw after their leader is wounded.
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July 21, 1862: The first stone is laid for the new Paris Opéra.
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July 27, 1862: A typhoon strikes the city of Canton (Guangzhou), China killing an estimated 37,000 people.
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July 28, 1862: British explorer John Hanning Speke reaches the spot where the Nile flows out of Lake Victoria. He names it Ripon Falls, after Lord Ripon, who arranged for his expedition. Speke will follow the river north, with some difficulty, and establish that Lake Victoria is one source of the Nile.
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July 30, 1862: Fünf Gedichte für eine Frauenstimme WWV 91 by Richard Wagner (49) to words of Mathilde Wesendonck are performed for the first time, at Laubenheim near Mainz. The songs were composed in 1857-1858 during Wagner’s liaison with Frau Wesendonck.
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August 4, 1862: Jules Massenet (20) receives an honorable mention in the Prix de Rome competition and a second prize in counterpoint.
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August 5, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces attack the Union positions at Baton Rouge but are repulsed.
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August 9, 1862: US Civil War: A Federal attack at Cedar Mountain near Culpeper, Virginia is repulsed with 3,729 total casualties.
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August 9, 1862: Béatrice et Bénédict, an opera comique by Hector Berlioz (58) to his own words after Shakespeare, is performed for the first time, in the New Theatre, Baden-Baden. Berlioz conducts in such pain that he can hardly stand.  In the audience is Pauline Viardot (41).
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August 11, 1862: Sarah Bernhardt makes her debut at the Comédie Française in Paris in Racine’s Iphegenie en Aulide.
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August 13, 1862: China agrees, in a treaty with Portugal signed in Tientsin (Tianjin), that Macao is Portuguese territory.
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August 15, 1862: The French open the first railway in Algeria, from Algiers to Blida.
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August 16, 1862: Alyeksandr Borodin (28) and his fiancee arrive in Berlin on their way home.
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August 18, 1862: Dakota Indians begin a revolt, mostly in Redwood and Yellow Medicine Counties in Minnesota. 44 whites are killed.
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August 19, 1862: The Théâtre du Châtelet is inaugurated in Paris.
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August 19, 1862: 16 whites are killed by Indians in and around New Ulm, Minnesota.
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August 20, 1862: The Vienna Stadtpark, designed by Rudolf Siebeck and Joseph Selleny, is opened to the public.
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August 20, 1862: Dakota Indians attack Fort Ridgely, Minnesota today and tomorrow but the attack fails.
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August 22, 1862: 04:30 Achille-Claude Debussy is born at 38 rue au Pain in St. Germain-en-Laye, Seine-et-Oise, French Empire, the first of five children born to Manuel-Achille Debussy, proprietor of a china shop and Victorine Joséphine Sophie Manoury, daughter of a wheelwright.
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August 23, 1862: Dakota Indians attack New Ulm, Minnesota again killing 34 whites and wounding 60. 40 Dakota are killed. Although most of the town is burned, it is successfully defended.
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August 27, 1862: 08:00 Johann Strauss (36) marries Henriette Carolina Josepha Chalupetzky (Jetty Treffz), a singer and mistress to Baron Moritz Tedesco (and mother of the Baron’s two daughters), in St. Stephen’s Cathedral, Vienna. The ceremony is witnessed only by the groom’s mother and his publisher, Carl Haslinger.
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August 29, 1862: After the Italian government secretly urged Garibaldi to raise an army and march on Rome, the Royal Italian Army finds the Garibaldists on Aspromonte in Calabria and fires on them. Twelve people die and Garibaldi is wounded twice.
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August 29, 1862: US Civil War: Confederates destroy Federal supply lines at Manassas on the same battlefield as 1861.
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August 30, 1862: US Civil War: Union troops again attack at Manassas and again are repulsed. They retreat towards Washington. The last two days have seen 25,000 total casualties.

Confederate troops invade Kentucky, capturing Lexington.

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September 2, 1862: Alphons Johannes Maria Diepenbrock is born on the Rokin no.a377 (now no.99) in Amsterdam, Kingdom of the Netherlands, the second of nine children born to Ferdinand Diepenbrock and Johanna Josephina Kuytenbrouwer.
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September 3, 1862: The new Théâtre de la Gaîte is inaugurated in Paris.
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September 4, 1862: A conference in Constantinople decides that the Turks will evacuate all fortresses in Serbia except Belgrade and three other cities.
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September 4, 1862: The electoral college names Bartolomé Mitre as President of Argentina.
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September 4, 1862: US Civil War: The Army of Northern Virginia crosses the Potomac River into Maryland.
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September 6, 1862: Louis Viardot signs a contract to puchase a house at 281 Dettenbachtal in Baden-Baden (now Fremerbergerstraße, however the house no longer stands).  He and his wife Pauline Viardot (41) will shortly move there from Paris.
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September 7, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate troops occupy Frederick, Maryland.

Federal troops retake Clarksville, Tennessee.

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September 8, 1862: Johannes Brahms (29) leaves Hamburg for Vienna. He plans to return if he is offered the position of conductor of the Hamburg Philharmonic Society. However, he will never live in his native city again.
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September 11, 1862: US Civil War: Southern troops take Hagerstown, Maryland.
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September 14, 1862: In Namamugi village (Yokohama) one British subject is killed and two others seriously injured when they fail to show proper deference to the daimyo of Satsuma.
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September 15, 1862: US Civil War: The Federal garrison at Harper’s Ferry surrenders to the Confederates. 12,000 Union troops are captured.
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September 17, 1862: US Civil War: Federal forces attack Confederate positions along the Antietam Creek near Sharpsburg, Maryland, 90 km northwest of Washington. “It was sheer concentrated violence, unleavened by generalship.” It is “the most murderous day of the...war.” 26,000 total casualties. Federals win the day but the Confederates are allowed to escape into Virginia.
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September 18, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate troops withdraw from Maryland.
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September 20, 1862: Imperial Chinese forces decisively defeat Taiping rebels at Tzeki (Cixi) near Ningpo (Ningbo).
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September 20, 1862: The doors of St. Petersburg Conservatory open for business. The director is Anton Rubinstein (32). One of the new part-time students is a civil servant named Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (22).
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September 22, 1862: US President Abraham Lincoln signs the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all slaves in territories currently in rebellion, to take effect 1 January.
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September 23, 1862: King Wilhelm of Prussia names Otto von Bismarck-Schönhausen as chief minister in order to break the deadlock between king and lower house of Parliament over military spending.
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September 23, 1862: The last engagement of the Dakota uprising takes place in Wood Lake, Minnesota. In the month-long revolt, 42 Indians and 737 whites have been killed. 425 Sioux will be tried, 303 sentenced to death. President Lincoln will commute most of the sentences. While the battle goes on, anti-war Dakota take control of 269 white prisoners held near the Chippewa River.
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September 24, 1862: Giuseppe Verdi (48) and his wife arrive once again in St. Petersburg to produce La forza del destino.
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September 26, 1862: Dakota Indians release all whites captured during the recent uprising in Minnesota. United States troops enter the main Dakota camp and imprison 1,200 Indians.
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September 28, 1862: Over the next six weeks, 393 Dakota are tried for the recent uprising.
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September 30, 1862: Speaking to the Prussian Landtag, Prime Minister Otto von Bismarck regrets that they have not passed the military budget. He utters his most famous phrase, “Not through speeches and majority decisions will the great questions of the day be decided - that was the great mistake of 1848 and 1849 - but by iron and blood.”
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October 2, 1862: Alyeksandr Borodin (28) and his fiancee cross the border into Russia at Verzhbolova (Virbalis, Lithuania).
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October 3, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces attack the Union positions at Corinth, Mississippi.
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October 4, 1862: US Civil War: Confederates are repulsed at Corinth. The two-day battle costs 6,700 total casualties.
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October 5, 1862: William Gladstone speaks in Newcastle advocating recognition of the Confederate States of America.
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October 7, 1862: Once again, the Prussian Landtag fails to pass a military budget. Prime Minister Otto von Bismarck adjourns them, and rules without a budget for four years.
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October 8, 1862: US Civil War: Fighting in Perryville, Kentucky forces the rebels to retreat. 1,355 people are killed, 5,486 wounded, 766 missing.
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October 14, 1862: Jacqueline, an operetta by Jacques Offenbach (43) to words of d’Archy (pseud. of Crémieux and Halévy), is performed for the first time, at the Bouffes-Parisiens, Paris.
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October 16, 1862: A revolt against King Othon of Greece begins in Vonitsa.
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October 18, 1862: Revolts against King Othon of Greece break out in Patras.
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October 18, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate forces capture Lexington, Kentucky.
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October 22, 1862: While King Othon I of Greece is touring the Peloponnesus, a revolt led by Demitrios Voulgaris overthrows him.
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October 23, 1862: In the face of an uprising in Athens, King Othon I of Greece is forced to abdicate. A regency council is put in place until a new King can be found. Demetrios Georgiou Voulgaris replaces Gennaios Theodorou Kolokotronis as Prime Minister of Greece. The new government announces the convening of a national assembly to elect a new king and create a constitution. King Othon departs for Venice aboard a ship of the Royal Navy.
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October 25, 1862: Reverie suggested by Longfellow’s “Song of the Silent Land” for organ by John Knowles Paine (23) is performed for the first time, by the composer in West Church, Boston.
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October 30, 1862: The Théâtre-Lyrique opens its new home, on the Place de Châtelet, Paris.
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November 1, 1862: The Prelude to Die Meistersinger by Richard Wagner (49) is performed for the first time, in the Leipzig Gewandhaus conducted by the composer.
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November 2, 1862: Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov (18) begins his first voyage as a naval officer on the clipper Almaz for a cruise of two-and-a-half years.
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November 3, 1862: The last 42 of 393 trials take place for the recent Dakota uprising. 323 of the trials result in conviction. 303 are sentenced to death by hanging.
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November 4, 1862: Richard Jordan Gatling receives a US patent for a “revolving gun battery” which shoots 350 rounds per minute. The United States Army will not accept the gun until 1866.
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November 6, 1862: A direct telegraph link is established between New York and San Francisco.
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November 8, 1862: Tsar Alyeksandr II confers the Cross of the Imperial and Royal Order of St. Stanislas on Giuseppe Verdi (49).
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November 9, 1862: Nachtigallen schwingen lustig op.6/6, a song by Johannes Brahms (29) to words of von Fallersleben, is performed for the first time, in the Basel Casino.
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November 9, 1862: Those Dakota condemned for the recent uprising are moved to Camp Lincoln, near Mankato. While passing through New Ulm, they are attacked by a mob. Some are killed, many injured.
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November 10, 1862: La forza del destino, an opera by Giuseppe Verdi (49) to words of Piave after Saavedra, is performed for the first time, at the Imperial Theatre, St. Petersburg. The work enjoys a good success.
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November 14, 1862: Richard Wagner (49) moves to Vienna once more, hoping to produce Tristan und Isolde there.
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November 16, 1862: Johannes Brahms (29) gives his first concert in Vienna, in the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde Vereinsaal. He plays the piano part in his Quartet for piano and strings no.1 op.25. It is a great popular and critical success, focusing attention on the newly arrived composer.
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November 18, 1862: The Prague Provisional Theatre opens with the expressed purpose of providing a stage for Czech art free of German domination. Among the orchestra members is a violist named Antonín Dvorák (21).
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November 22, 1862: Demolirer Polka op.269 and the waltz Carnevals-Botschafter op.270 by Johann Strauss (37) are performed for the first time, in the Sperl Ballroom, Vienna.
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November 23, 1862: Richard Wagner (49) reads his poem Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg in the home of Dr. Josef Standhartner in Vienna.
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November 23, 1862: Bluette op.271, a polka française by Johann Strauss (37), is performed for he first time, in the Redoutensaal, Vienna.
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November 24, 1862: Salammbô by Gustave Flaubert is published by Michel Lévy in Paris.
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November 26, 1862: US President Lincoln meets Harriet Beecher Stowe for the first time and remarks, “So this is the little lady who made the big war.”
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November 29, 1862: Quartet for piano and strings no.2 by Johannes Brahms (29) is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna, the composer at the keyboard in his first solo concert in the city. The positive reviews create a reputation for Brahms in Vienna.
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December 6, 1862: Greeks begin voting on who should be their king.
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December 6, 1862: US President Lincoln orders the execution of 39 Dakota out of the 303 recently sentenced to death for the Dakota Uprising. One will have his sentence commuted after new evidence casts doubt on his guilt.
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December 9, 1862: Luigi Carlo Farini replaces Urbano Rattazzi as Prime Minister of Italy.
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December 9, 1862: Giuseppe Verdi (49) and his wife depart St. Petersburg for Paris.
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December 12, 1862: Eléonore Adélaide Royer de Marancour Massenet appears before authorities in Nice to plead that her youngest son not be taken for military service. Noting that young Jules (20) has three brothers already in service, they agree.
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December 12, 1862: Arthur Sullivan (20) makes the last of several visits with Gioachino Rossini (70) which he has made over the last few days in Paris. They were recently introduced. Rossini presents Sullivan with an inscribed photograph of himself.
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December 13, 1862: The protecting powers tell the Greek government and people that no member of their royal houses may be King of Greece.
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December 13, 1862: US Civil War: Federal forces attack Confederates dug in on Marye’s Heights above Fredericksburg, Virginia, 80 km south of Washington. They are repulsed with heavy losses. The day leaves 18,030 total casualties.
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December 15, 1862: Ten days of voting concludes in Greece on the subject of a new king. The electorate overwhelmingly favors Prince Alfred, the second son of Queen Victoria.
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December 17, 1862: US Civil War: General Ulysses S. Grant issues Order no.11, which expels all Jews from territory under Union control in Tennessee, Kentucky, and Mississippi. The order is carried out.
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December 20, 1862: Alyeksandr Borodin (29) is appointed to the post of adjunct professor in chemistry at the Medico-Surgical Academy in St. Petersburg.
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December 26, 1862: Richard Wagner (49) conducts music from his unperformed music-dramas Das Rheingold, Die Walküre, and Die Meistersinger in Vienna in a concert attended by Empress Elizabeth of Austria.
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December 26, 1862: 38 Dakota warriors are hanged at Mankato, Minnesota for their part in the Dakota Uprising to the cheers of a local crowd.
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December 30, 1862: The Federal ironclad USS Monitor is lost in a storm off Cape Hatteras. 16 people are lost, 47 saved.
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December 31, 1862: US Civil War: Confederate troops attack Federals at Murfreesboro, Tennessee and gain the advantage. The day costs 23,000 total casualties.