A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1832 – December 31, 1832

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January 2, 1832: Antonio López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón leads a revolt against Mexican President Bustamante at Veracruz.
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January 4, 1832: The slave revolt in Jamaica is brutally repressed. Officially, 207 slaves have been killed, although estimates exceed 400. Almost 400 more will be executed.
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January 5, 1832: Vincenzo Bellini (30) sets out from Milan on a long journey to Naples and Sicily. It will become a “triumphal procession” wherever he goes.
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January 6, 1832: The New England Anti-Slavery Society is founded in Boston in the middle of a northeaster.
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January 7, 1832: The Conference of London reinstates the northern Greek border of 26 September, from Arta to Volos.
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January 8, 1832: Francisco Tadeo Calomarde Arria replaces Manuel González Salmón y Gómez de Torres as First Secretary of State of Spain.
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January 10, 1832: A paper called “Some Morbid Appearances of the Absorbent Glands and Spleen” is read to a meeting of the Medical and Surgical Society in London. Since the author, Thomas Hodgkin, is not a member, it is read by the secretary. It is the first description of the disease which bears the author’s name.
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January 12, 1832: Michael Faraday reads the second part of his paper Experimental Researches in Electricity to the Royal Society in London.
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January 12, 1832: Fausta, a melodramma by Gaetano Donizetti (34) to words of Gilardoni and the composer, is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples. The work scores a major success.
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January 14, 1832: The Monte de Pietà e d’Abbondanza in Busseto grants Giuseppe Verdi (18) a scholarship.
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January 19, 1832: Austrian troops occupy Ancona after unrest in the Papal States.
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January 19, 1832: Giacomo Meyerbeer (40) is created a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor by King Louis Philippe.
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January 22, 1832: French police arrest leaders of the St. Simonians, an egalitarian religious-political group who number many top artists among them. Ferdinand Hiller and Heinrich Heine witness the arrests. Among their effects is Mendelssohn’s (22) Piano Quartet in b minor. Although he is present in Paris, Mendelssohn never associates with the group.
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January 28, 1832: Franz Liszt (20) gives a highly successful charity concert in Rouen.
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February 3, 1832: USS Lexington reaches Montevideo from the Falklands with their prisoners. They plan to hold them until Argentina accedes to US demands.
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February 12, 1832: The Galapagos Islands are annexed by Ecuador.
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February 13, 1832: It having proved impossible for the Prince of Saxe-Coburg to assume the throne of Greece, the guaranteeing powers (Great Britain, France, Russia) offer it to Otto, second son of King Ludwig I of Bavaria.
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February 15, 1832: Friedrich Wieck and his daughter Clara (12) reach Paris. Here they will meet Nicolò Paganini (49), Friedrich Kalkbrenner (46), Giacomo Meyerbeer (40), Henri Herz (29), Felix Mendelssohn (22), and Frédéric Chopin (21). Clara is introduced to Parisian music making and society.
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February 17, 1832: Incidental music to Raupach’s play König Enzio WWV 24 by Richard Wagner (18) is performed for the first time, in the Royal Saxon Hoftheater, Leipzig.
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February 20, 1832: The Demon, or The Mystic Branch, a romantic opera by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Ftizball and Buckstone after Scribe, is performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London. It is a reworking of Meyerbeer’s (40) Robert le diable.
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February 21, 1832: Clara Wieck (12) and her father meet Frédéric Chopin (21) for the first time, in Paris. Chopin is very complementary of her talent and will send her a manuscript copy of his Piano Concerto in e minor.
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February 22, 1832: Antonio de Saavedra y Frigola, Conde de Alcudia replaces Francisco Tadeo Calomarde Arria as First Secretary of State of Spain.
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February 23, 1832: French ships land a force to seize the port of Ancona to counter Austrian intervention in the Papal States.
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February 26, 1832: Frédéric Chopin (21) gives his first concert in Paris, in the Salle Pleyel. The performance is organized by Frédéric Kalkbrenner (46) and Camille Pleyel and praised by Franz Liszt (20) and Felix Mendelssohn (23). The program includes Beethoven’s (†4) Quintet op.29, Chopin’s e minor piano concerto and Introduction March and Grand Polonaise for six pianos by Kalkbrenner (Chopin and Kalkbrenner take part). Antoni Orlawski will write, “All Paris was stupefied!” Chopin “mopped up the floor with every one of the pianists here.” In fact, the hall is only one-third full, and many of the patrons are Polish emigrés.
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February 26, 1832: Tsar Nikolay I signs an Organic Statute, abolishing the Polish Constitution and establishing direct Russian rule over Poland.
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February 27, 1832: The publisher Aristide Farrenc meets Frédéric Chopin (21) and obtains the copyright to five of his compositions: the two piano concertos, the Trio in g op.8, the Rondo á la Krakowiak op.14, and the Fantasy on Polish Airs op.13.
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February 27, 1832: John Field (49) makes his first appearance in England since leaving 30 years ago.
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February 29, 1832: The first Constitution of the State of New Granada (Colombia) is adopted.
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March 8, 1832: Nicolò Paganini (49) departs Southampton for Le Havre. In the last ten months he has given 140 concerts in the British Isles.
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March 9, 1832: King Wilhelm of Hannover (King William IV of Britain) reappoints Heinrich August Marschner (36) as Kapellmeister for five years. Marschner declines the contract at 1,200 thalers. When the king offers 100 more, Marschner accepts.
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March 10, 1832: Des Falkners Braut, a komische Oper by Heinrich August Marschner (36) to words of Wohlbrück after Spindler, is performed for the first time, in Leipzig Stadttheater. It receives only three performances.
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March 10, 1832: Muzio Clementi dies in Evesham, Worcestershire, United Kingdom, after a brief illness, aged 80 years, one month and 16 days.
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March 13, 1832: Gaetano Donizetti’s (34) tragedia lirica Ugo, conte di Parigi to words of Romani after Bis, is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan. It will receive only four performances.
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March 15, 1832: At a General Meeting of the London Philharmonic Society, it is resolved that the Society should attend the funeral of Muzio Clementi “as a token of respect to his memory...”
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March 18, 1832: Gebre Krestos Gebre Mesay replaces Iyasu IV Salomon as as Emperor of Ethiopia.
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March 19, 1832: Clara Wieck (12) gives the first of two concerts in Paris, at Stoepel’s Music School with a piano lent by Erard. She is one of several performers.
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March 20, 1832: Der Alchymist, a romantic opera by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Fitzball and Bayly after Irving, is performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London. It is a reworking of several operas by Louis Spohr (47).
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March 22, 1832: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe dies in Weimar at the age of 82.
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March 25, 1832: Nicolò Paganini (49) gives the first concert on his second trip to Paris, just days before the arrival of cholera in the city.
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March 26, 1832: Charles Marie de Brouckère replaces Félix Armand de Mûelenaere as head of government for Belgium.
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March 26, 1832: The mortal remains of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe are laid to rest in Weimar. Music for the event is composed and directed by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53).
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March 29, 1832: After a funeral service, the mortal remains of Muzio Clementi are laid to rest in the Cloisters of Westminster Abbey. The Abbey is packed with mourners, among them are many musicians including Clementi’s most famous pupil, John Field (49).
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March 29, 1832: A cholera epidemic is officially announced in Paris. Before it recedes in September, 18,000 will die in the city of the disease, 13,000 in April alone.
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March 30, 1832: A Benedictus by Samuel Sebastian Wesley (21) is performed for the first time, in London.
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April 4, 1832: Lowell Mason (40) reaches agreement with the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, allowing him to publish whatever he wants independent of the society.
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April 5, 1832: Prime Minister Casimir Périer of France falls ill with the cholera currently ravaging the continent.
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April 5, 1832: One day before the second concert given by Nicolò Paganini (49) on this trip to Paris, patrons terrified by the cholera epidemic storm the box office demanding their money back.
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April 6, 1832: Sauk Indians move from Iowa to their traditional planting grounds in Illinois. White settlers panic and fire on them, killing one. The Indians respond in kind. This begins the Black Hawk War.
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April 8, 1832: A government commission takes over in Greece, replacing President Avgoustinos Kapodistrias.
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April 9, 1832: Clara Wieck (12) gives the second of two concerts in Paris, on a program with others, at Stoepel’s Music School. Her father originally reserved the larger Hôtel de Ville but the cholera epidemic has sent many Parisians fleeing the city. The small audience is impressed that all of her music not improvised is performed from memory.
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April 10, 1832: At the height of the cholera epidemic in Paris, 2,000 people die today. The city runs out of coffins.
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April 10, 1832: After Mohammed Ali demands Syria for helping the Turks against the Greeks, the Ottoman Empire declares war on Egypt.
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April 12, 1832: King William IV approves of the incorporation of Montreal as a city.
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April 13, 1832: Friedrich Wieck and his daughter Clara (12) depart Paris for Leipzig.
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April 16, 1832: Giacomo Meyerbeer (40) departs Paris to aid in the production of Robert le diable in London.
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April 19, 1832: Giacomo Meyerbeer (40) arrives in London to aid in the production of Robert le diable.
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April 20, 1832: Nicolò Paganini (49) gives his second performance in Paris. Of this, Franz Liszt (20) writes, “What a man, what a violin, what an artist...heavens, what suffering, what misery, what tortures in those four strings...” (Zaluski, 156)
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April 22, 1832: After recovering from Asiatic cholera, Felix Mendelssohn (23) arrives in London from Paris.
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April 22, 1832: A Scene and Aria WWV 28 for soprano and orchestra by Richard Wagner (18) is performed for the first time, in the Leipzig Hoftheater.
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April 25, 1832: Having not heard from his letter of last 20 August, Robert Schumann (21) writes a second letter to Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53), enclosing his Papillons op.2.
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April 28, 1832: A new French law reduces the number of capital offenses, ends the punishments of branding and mutilation, and allows juries to consider extenuating circumstances.
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April 29, 1832: Valentin Alkan (18) gives the first performance of his Concerto da camera op.10 no.1, at the Paris Conservatoire.
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April 30, 1832: Caroline de Bourbon, widow of the Duc de Berry, lands near Marseille in an attempt to place her son on the throne of France.
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May 1, 1832: Friedrich Wieck and his daughter Clara (12) arrive home in Leipzig from her concertizing in Paris. She records in her diary that 15 minutes after their arrival, she is cleaning knives in the kitchen.
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May 2, 1832: Hector Berlioz (28) leaves Rome after his Prix de Rome year, making for France.
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May 5, 1832: Recognized at a rehearsal of the London Philharmonic, Felix Mendelssohn (23) is given an ovation by the musicians. To the composer this was “more precious than any distinction…”
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May 7, 1832: The Treaty of London, signed by Bavaria, France, Russia, and the United Kingdom, recognizes the independence of Greece. Akarnania and the Arta-Volos border are restored to Greece. Otto, the second son of King Ludwig of Bavaria, is named King of Greece.
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May 8, 1832: The Tyrolese Peasant, a domestic opera by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Payne, is performed for the first time, in Covent Garden, London.
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May 9, 1832: By the Treaty of Payne’s Landing (Florida), the Seminole Indians give up all their claims to Florida and are forced to move west of the Mississippi.
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May 10, 1832: Egypt annexes the Holy Land under Ottoman control.
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May 12, 1832: L’elisir d’amore, a melodramma giocoso by Gaetano Donizetti (34) to words of Romani after Scribe, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Canobbiana, Milan. The work scores an immediate success.
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May 14, 1832: The Isles of Fingal, an overture by Felix Mendelssohn (23), is performed for the first time, in London, conducted by the composer. The press is mixed. It will later be known as The Hebrides or Fingal’s Cave.
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May 16, 1832: Prime Minister Casimir Pierre Périer of France dies in Paris of cholera, one of over 18,000 victims of the disease in Paris alone.
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May 22, 1832: Giuseppe Verdi (18) is issued a passport by the Duchy of Parma for travel to Milan, which he will do in late June.
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May 23, 1832: Sam Sharpe, leader of the slave revolt in Jamaica, is executed.
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May 24, 1832: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53) in Weimar writes to Robert Schumann (21) in Leipzig. Schumann wrote twice to Hummel asking for a critique of his opp.1 and 2. Hummel finds Schumann talented but says he is “trying too hard to achieve originality, by which I mean something strange.” (Kroll 286) He encourages Schumann but says nothing about taking him as a pupil.
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May 25, 1832: Capriccio Brillant in b minor for piano and orchestra by Felix Mendelssohn (23) is performed for the first time, in London, the composer at the keyboard.
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May 26, 1832: Giacomo Meyerbeer (40) departs London for Berlin, two weeks before the production there of Robert le diable.
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May 27, 1832: Egyptian forces of Ibrahim, son of Mohammed Ali, take Acre after a siege. Egypt annexes Syria, although both are nominally under Turkish rule.
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May 27, 1832: 20-30,000 German liberals meet at Neustadt and march to the ruins of an old castle near Hambach. They listen to speeches calling for patriotism and political reform.
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May 28, 1832: Hector Berlioz (28) crosses from Italy into France. Although he does not now know it, he will never see Italy again.
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May 29, 1832: The Rideau Canal is officially opened over 202 km between Kingston and Bytown (Ottawa), Ontario. It was built to provide a route from the Great Lakes to the Atlantic safe from attacks by the United States.
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May 31, 1832: Giacomo Meyerbeer (40) arrives in Berlin from London.
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June 4, 1832: Under threat of begin packed, the House of Lords passes the British Reform Bill. It brings more democracy both to the distribution of seats throughout the country and qualifications for suffrage.
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June 5, 1832: French republicans stage an elaborate funeral for one of their heroes, General Maximilien Lamarque. Along the procession, several fights with soldiers break out. Speeches are given at the Pont d’Austerlitz. While the Marquis de Lafayette speaks, he is kidnapped and placed in a carriage headed for the Hôtel de Ville, in an apparent attempt to proclaim a republic. He escapes and finds his way home. Republicans fire on dragoons, killing six and wounding several others. In the confusion, the dragoons charge into a crowd of innocent onlookers. Soon, a general insurrection has taken place with republicans in control of the center of Paris. Within hours, loyal troops have retaken the city and King Louis-Philippe returns to the Tuileries Palace.
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June 6, 1832: Loyal troops slowly complete the crushing of the Paris revolt. It takes all day. King Louis-Philippe rides through the city to triumphant cries of support from the citizenry. Government forces count 70 killed, 326 wounded. Insurgent casualties are estimated at 100 killed, 200-300 wounded. A state of siege is declared in order to apply summary justice to the 1,500 people taken prisoner.
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June 6, 1832: Jeremy Bentham dies in London at the age of 84.
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June 7, 1832: The British Third Reform Bill, effectively enfranchising the middle class, receives royal assent and becomes law.
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June 10, 1832: Felix Mendelssohn (23) gives a very successful organ recital in St. Paul’s Cathedral, London. The building is packed.
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June 14, 1832: Robert Schumann (22) notes in his diary that “the third finger is completely stiff.”
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June 18, 1832: King Ludwig of Bavaria appoints Prince Wrede to govern the Palatinate, with half of the Bavarian army to impose order. Wrede will declare martial law and arrest liberal dissenters, including the speakers of 27 May.
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June 18, 1832: The Magic Fan, or The Filip on the Nose, an operetta by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Fitzball, is performed for the first time, in Vauxhall Gardens, London.
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June 20, 1832: A new US charge d’affaires, Robert Baylies, arrives in Buenos Aires to try to resolve the Falklands dispute. The Argentines require reparations before any negotiations.
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June 20, 1832: Robert der Teufel by Giacomo Meyerbeer (30) is produced in Berlin.
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June 20, 1832: La tentation, an opéra-ballet by Fromental Halévy (33) and Casimir Gide to words of Cavé and Coralli, is performed for the first time, in the Paris Opéra.
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June 21, 1832: William Crotch (56) resigns as first principal of the Royal Academy of Music.
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June 22, 1832: Giuseppe Verdi (18) writes to the Milan Conservatory requesting admission as a paying pupil and sending compositions.
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June 22, 1832: Felix Mendelssohn (23) departs London to return home to Berlin. Before he leaves, the London branch of Erard presents him with one of their pianos. In the last few days he met Nicolò Paganini (49) at a party.
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June 25, 1832: Felix Mendelssohn (23) returns home to Berlin after his grand tour. In two years he has visited Italy, France, and England.
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June 28, 1832: The German Diet passes the “Six Articles” expressing thanks for the leadership of Austria and Prussia and expressing faith in the ruling monarchies of Germany. Designed by Metternich, it gives the Diet power to stifle liberal reforms.
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June 28, 1832: An epidemic of Asiatic cholera begins in New York City. It will spread into New England.
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June 29, 1832: The French Cour de Cassation rules the declaration of a state of siege on 6 June to be in violation of the Charter.
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June 30, 1832: An overture to Hell’s (after Scribe) play Yelva, oder Die Stumme by Albert Lortzing (30) is performed for the first time, in Pyrmont.
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July 3, 1832: Count Sormani-Andreani, director of Milan Conservatory, reports the unfavorable results of Giuseppe Verdi’s (18) entrance examination. Giuseppe Corbari, a civil clerk, includes comments that Verdi is too old, lives outside Lombardy and Venetia, and did badly on the piano examination.
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July 5, 1832: The German Diet passes the “Ten Articles” which restate the restrictions on speech, the press, and political organizations. The German states pledge mutual assistance to deal with popular unrest.
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July 6, 1832: Having returned to England from France, Nicolò Paganini (49) gives a concert in Covent Garden, London. He will perform there twelve times over the next six weeks.
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July 8, 1832: A force of 7,500 Portuguese liberals led by Dom Pedro, former emperor of Brazil, sailing from the Azores, lands unopposed at the mouth of the River Mindelo, north of Porto. Their intention is to place Pedro’s daughter Maria, who was deposed in 1828, back on the throne.
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July 9, 1832: A force of Portuguese liberals enter Porto unopposed.
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July 10, 1832: Samuel Sebastian Wesley (21) is appointed organist at Hereford Cathedral. He will begin duties in September.
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July 10, 1832: US President Andrew Jackson vetoes the renewal of the charter of the Second Bank of the United States. He claims the bank is elitist and favors northeastern interests.
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July 13, 1832: Henry Schoolcraft becomes the first European-American to reach Lake Itasca and identify it as the source of the Mississippi River.
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July 21, 1832: United States troops attack Indians at Wisconsin Heights (Dane County, Wisconsin) killing 40 people. The Indians escape under cover of darkness.
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July 26, 1832: The national assembly of Pronia meets. They abolish the Senate, proclaim an amnesty, and declare themselves a constituent assembly to draft a new constitution for Greece.
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July 27, 1832: The Bottle of Champagne, an operetta by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Fitzball, is performed for the first time, in Vauxhall Gardens, London.
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July 30, 1832: An overture and incidental music to Fitzball’s play The Dilosk Gatherer by Samuel Sebastian Wesley (21), are performed for the first time, at the Royal Olympic Theatre, London.
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August 1, 1832: The Anatomy Act receives Royal Assent. Hitherto, only the bodies of executed murderers could be dissected. This broadened what bodies could be used for teaching and research in Great Britain in response to public fears of the illicit trafficking in cadavers.
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August 2, 1832: The Illinois militia massacre Sauk and Fox Indians at the mouth of the Bad Axe River in southwest Wisconsin, thus ending the Black Hawk War. The 300 Indian casualties include many women and children. Numerous rapes ensue. In four months of fighting, between 500 and 700 people have been killed.
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August 8, 1832: The Greek National Assembly votes Prince Otto of Bavaria as King of Greece.
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August 11, 1832: King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia grants Giacomo Meyerbeer (40) the title of court conductor (Hofkapellmeister).
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August 14, 1832: Melchor Eca y Múzquiz replaces Anastasio Bustamante y Oseguera as acting President of Mexico.
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August 15, 1832: Pope Gregory XVI issues the encyclical Mirari vos, condemning religious liberalism and indifferentism, the belief that salvation may be achieved regardless of one’s religion.
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August 19, 1832: Unable to resolve the Falklands dispute, US charge d’affaires Robert Baylies departs Buenos Aires for home.
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August 25, 1832: César Franck (9) is given a large collection of the music of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53) as a prize for winning the first prize in solfege at the Royal Conservatory of Liège.
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August 26, 1832: Messe in D-Dur for soloists, chorus, and orchestra by Otto Nicolai (22) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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August 27, 1832: Black Hawk is turned over to the United States government by Winnebago Indians.
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August 27, 1832: The Sedan Chair, an operetta by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Fitzball, is performed for the first time, in Vauxhall Gardens, London.
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September 3, 1832: During the night of 3-4 September, three slaves set fire to Paramaribo, Suriname, destroying over 100 structures. The three will be executed.
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September 7, 1832: Giacomo Meyerbeer (41) and his wife arrive back in Paris after a circuitous journey from Berlin.
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September 12, 1832: Edouard Robert, one of the directors of the Théâtre-Italien, writes to Gioachino Rossini (40) in Toulouse that the chorlera epidemic is over in Paris and he may return.
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September 17, 1832: Albert Joseph Goblet d’Alviella replaces Charles Marie de Brouckère as head of government for Belgium.
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September 21, 1832: Walter Scott dies in Abbotsford, Roxburgh, Scotland at the age of 61.
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September 21, 1832: The United States signs a treaty with the Sac and Fox Indians. The Indians cede all their lands and agree to move west of the Mississippi River. This ends the Black Hawk War.
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September 26, 1832: After 22 years of construction, the Göta Canal opens, linking Göteborg on the west coast of Sweden with Söderköping on the Baltic.
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September 27, 1832: Nicolò Paganini (49) returns to Paris after another concert tour of England.
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September 29, 1832: Absolutist forces of King Miguel of Portugal attack the liberal army in Porto, but are repulsed.
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September 30, 1832: Clara Wieck (13) appears at a Leipzig Gewandhaus subscription series concert, playing Moscheles’ Piano Concerto in g minor from memory.
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October 1, 1832: José Cafranga Costilla replaces Antonio de Saavedra y Frigola, Conde de Alcudia as First Secretary of State of Spain.
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October 1, 1832: His First Campaign, a military spectacle by Adolphe Adam (29), is performed for the first time, at Covent Garden, London.
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October 1, 1832: Le serment, ou Les faux-monnoyeurs, an opéra by Daniel Auber (50) to words of Scribe and Mazères, is performed for the first time, in the Paris Opéra.
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October 11, 1832: Nicolas Jean de Dieu Soult, duc de Dalmatie becomes Prime Minister of France. The position has been vacant since 16 May.
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October 11, 1832: Die erste Walpurgisnacht, a cantata for chorus and orchestra by Felix Mendelssohn (23) to words of Goethe, is performed for the first time, privately, in his family’s home in Berlin. See 10 January 1833.
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October 11, 1832: Der Pole und sein Kind, oder Der Feldwebel vom IV Regiment, a liederspiel by Albert Lortzing (30) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Osnabrück.
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October 13, 1832: Pageant in Memory of Sir Walter Scott, a spectacle with music by Henry R. Bishop (45), is performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London.
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October 13, 1832: Johanna Mockel (22) marries the book and music seller Johann Paul Mathieux in Cologne.  The marriage will prove to be abusive and, although Roman Catholic, she will file for divorce.
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October 14, 1832: The Kingdom of the Two Sicilies agrees to pay compensation to the United States for injuries which occurred during the rule of Joachim Murat. The presence of US warships helps speed the negotiations.
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October 15, 1832: La médecine sans médecin, an opéra comique by Ferdinand Hérold (41) to words of Scribe and Bayard, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de la Bourse, Paris.
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October 20, 1832: Jean Louis Joseph Lebeau replaces Albert Joseph Goblet d’Alviella as head of government for Belgium.
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October 29, 1832: The Doom-Kiss, a legendary operatic entertainment with music by Henry R. Bishop (45) to words of Pocock, is performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London.
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November 1, 1832: At the Mendelssohn residence in Berlin, Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (26) gives birth to a dead girl.
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November 4, 1832: Symphony no.4 “Die Weihe der Töne” by Louis Spohr (48) is performed for the first time, in Kassel.
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November 4, 1832: Gaetano Donizetti’s (34) tragedia lirica Sancia di Castiglia to words of Salatino is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples. It is given a warm reception, but will soon disappear.
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November 5, 1832: The Philharmonic Society of London commissions Felix Mendelssohn (23) to compose “a symphony, an overture, and a vocal composition.”
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November 5, 1832: Over the last twelve days, 6,000 people have died in New Orleans of Asiatic cholera.
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November 5, 1832: The Dark Diamond, an historical melodrama by Adolphe Adam (29), is performed for the first time, at Covent Garden, London.
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November 6, 1832: Robert Schumann (22) writes to his mother, “I have become fully resigned and consider my hand incurable.” His loss of one hand is attributed either to a device intended to strengthen his hand or to mercury poisoning which is part of a treatment for syphilis.
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November 7, 1832: After a month-long trip from Italy to La Côte-St.-André and a stay of five months with his family, Hector Berlioz (28) once again reaches Paris.
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November 7, 1832: After a failed insurrection attempting to place her son on the French throne, Caroline de Bourbon is arrested in Nantes.
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November 8, 1832: Hector Berlioz (28) learns that Harriet Smithson is residing in Paris and will be appearing in English plays very shortly.
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November 9, 1832: Weihgesang for four male voices by Felix Mendelssohn (23), to words of Müller, is performed for the first time, in Weimar.
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November 10, 1832: The Wilderness and the Solitary Place, an anthem by cathedral organist Samuel Sebastian Wesley (22), is performed for the first time, during ceremonies for the opening of the rebuilt Hereford Cathedral.
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November 10, 1832: Charles Carroll dies at his home in Baltimore at the age of 95. He was the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence.
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November 14, 1832: The first streetcar in North America goes into service in New York. It is drawn by horses.
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November 15, 1832: Symphony no.5 “Reformation” by Felix Mendelssohn (23), originally intended for the 400th anniversary of the Augsburg Confession, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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November 18, 1832: The first movement of Robert Schumann’s (22) Symphony in g minor is performed for the first time, in Zwickau. The symphony is not a success but Clara Wieck (13), on the same program, decidedly is. See 12 February 1833.
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November 19, 1832: The first of seven attempts on the life of French King Louis-Philippe takes place on the Pont Royal when law student Louis Bergeron fires a shot at the king. He misses.
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November 24, 1832: South Carolina institutes an Order of Nullification, nullifying federal tariff laws.
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November 29, 1832: Francisco Cea Bermúdez replaces José Cafranga Costilla as First Secretary of State of Spain.
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November 29, 1832: Adolf von Henselt (18) makes his official public debut in Munich to great success.
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December 1, 1832: Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage, an overture by Felix Mendelssohn (19), is performed publicly for the first time, in Berlin. See 7 September 1828.
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December 4, 1832: French forces begin bombarding the Dutch citadel of Antwerp.
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December 5, 1832: A month of voting in the United States presidential election concluding today ensures the victory of President Andrew Jackson over Senator Henry Clay.
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December 9, 1832: Le retour à la vie, mélologue en six parties for orchestra by Hector Berlioz (28) is performed for the first time, in the Paris Conservatoire. The work is intended as a sequel to Symphonie fantastique and will be renamed Lélio, ou Le retour à la vie. Berlioz sends tickets to Harriet Smithson through a British journalist. It is not until she enters a cab to go to the Conservatoire that her companion, the journalist Schutter, gives her the program, and she finds out whose music she will hear. Among those present are Nicolò Paganini (50), Franz Liszt (21), Frédéric Chopin (22), George Sand, Heinrich Heine, Alexandre Dumas, and Victor Hugo. Symphonie fantastique is also presented but in a much better performance than 1830. Harriet “felt the room reel about her; she heard no more, but sat in a dream, and at the end went home like a sleepwalker, hardly aware of what was happening.”
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December 10, 1832: President Andrew Jackson declares any act of nullification an act of rebellion and threatens to use force against South Carolina or any state which does not uphold federal law.
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December 10, 1832: On the eve of his 29th birthday, Hector Berlioz is officially introduced to Harriet Smithson in Paris, the English actress with whom he has been infatuated for five years.
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December 15, 1832: The Symphony in C by Richard Wagner (19) is performed publicly for the first time, in Leipzig.
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December 15, 1832: Ferdinand Hérold’s (41) opéra comique Le pré aux clercs to words of Planard after Mérimée is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de la Bourse, Paris. The reception is very enthusiastic.
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December 18, 1832: After five years and two symphonies since he first became infatuated with her, Hector Berlioz (29) hears Harriet Smithson say, “Eh bien, Berlioz...Je vous aime.”
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December 19, 1832: Hector Berlioz (29) writes to Franz Liszt (21) about Harriet Smithson, “Everything about her delights and exalts me; the frank confession of her feelings has astounded me and driven me almost mad...I will never leave her. She is my star. She has understood me. If it is a mistake, you must allow me to make it; she will adorn the closing days of my life, which, I hope, will not last long...Yes, I love her! I love her! and I am loved. She told me that herself yesterday in front of her sister; yes, she loves me, but I speak of it only to you, I wish to keep my happiness secret, if it is possible. So, silence! There is nothing now which can separate us.”
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December 21, 1832: Egyptian forces defeat the Ottomans at Konya.
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December 21, 1832: Albert Lortzing’s (31) vaudeville Der Weihnachtsabend to his own words is performed for the first time, in Münster.
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December 21, 1832: Rival Mexican armies battle near Puebla.
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December 23, 1832: After a month-long siege, French forces capture Antwerp, forcing the Netherlands to recognize the independence of Belgium.
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December 23, 1832: An 18-page biography of Hector Berlioz (29) appears in the Revue de Paris. Signed by Joseph d’Ortigue, it is written mostly by the subject.
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December 23, 1832: An armistice is signed at Zavaleta Hacienda, Mexico. Anastasio Bustamante y Oseguera resigns in favor of Santa Anna’s man, Manuel Gómez Pedraza y Rodríguez.
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December 24, 1832: Manuel Gómez Pedraza y Rodríguez replaces Melchor Eca y Múzquiz as President of Mexico.
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December 25, 1832: Piano Concerto no.7 by John Field (50) is performed completely for the first time.
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December 28, 1832: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) is awarded the Order of the White Falcon by his employer, Grand Duke Carl Friedrich of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.
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December 28, 1832: United States Vice-President John C. Calhoun resigns his post to carry on the battle for nullification in the US Senate.