A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1829 – December 31, 1829

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January 1, 1829: The overture to the opera Fierabras D.796 by Franz Schubert (†0) is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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January 8, 1829: Samuel Sebastian Wesley (18) is appointed organist at St. Giles, Camberwell.
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January 10, 1829: La fiancée, an opéra comique by Daniel Auber (46) to words of Scribe after Mason and Brucker, is performed for the first time, in Théâtre Feydeau, Paris.
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January 12, 1829: Il paria, a melodramma by Gaetano Donizetti (31) to words of Gilardoni after Delavigne, is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples.
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January 15, 1829: Giacomo Meyerbeer (37) meets with Alexander von Humboldt in Paris. The composer wants Humboldt to bring a message to King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia when he travels to Berlin. His message is to apologize that Robert le diable has not yet been produced in Berlin because it has taken two years to get it produced in Paris. Meyerbeer promised it to the king as the first production after Paris.
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January 18, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) gives a command performance before King Anton of Saxony and his court at Brühl Palace, Dresden.
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January 19, 1829: The first part of Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is performed for the first time, in Braunschweig.
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January 23, 1829: One day after he is appointed to the Academy of Fine Arts, the painter Wilhelm Hensel asks Abraham and Lea Mendelssohn for the hand of their daughter, Fanny (23). Abraham agrees willingly and enthusiastically. Lea is too shocked to respond.
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January 28, 1829: William Burke is hanged in the Lawnmarket, Edinburgh. He was found guilty of murdering 16 people and selling the bodies to the surgeon, Dr. Robert Knox, for educational purposes. Burke’s accomplice, William Hare, was spared the gallows in return for confessing and implicating Burke. Burke’s body is publicly dissected at Edinburgh Medical College. (His skeleton is still on display at the college)
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January 30, 1829: Mirjams Siegesgesang D.942 by Franz Schubert (†0) is performed for the first time, at a memorial concert on the eve of what would have been the composer’s 32nd birthday.
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February 1, 1829: Jonathan Martin, an extreme non-conformist, sets fire to York Cathedral. It does great damage, destroying all interior furniture and bringing down the roof. Martin will be judged insane.
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February 5, 1829: Contrary to long held and oft-expressed beliefs against Catholic emancipation, Home Secretary Robert Peel speaks in the House of Commons in favor of its passage.
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February 5, 1829: Yelva, or The Orphan of Russia, a musical drama by Henry R. Bishop (42) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Covent Garden, London.
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February 6, 1829: Le jeune propriétaire et le vieux fermier, ou La ville et le village, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (25) to words of Dartois, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre des Nouveautés, Paris.
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February 9, 1829: Pierre et Catherine, an opera by Adolphe Adam (25) to words of Vernoy de Saint-Georges, is performed for the first time, by the Opéra-Comique, Paris. It is his first production with the Opéra-Comique and a great success.
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February 10, 1829: Annibale Francesco Sermattei, conte della Genga, Pope Leo XII, dies in Rome.
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February 14, 1829: Prime Minister Karl Ludwig Wilhelm von Grolman of Hesse-Darmstadt dies in Darmstadt and is succeeded by Karl Wilhelm Heinrich du Bos Du Thil.
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February 14, 1829: La straniera, a melodramma by Vincenzo Bellini (27) to words of Romani after Prévôt, is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan. It is even more successful than last year’s Il pirata.
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February 16, 1829: A cantata for the engagement of Princess Augusta of Saxe-Weimar by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (50) is performed for the first time.
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February 16, 1829: François-Joseph Gossec dies at Passy, Paris, Kingdom of France, aged 95 years and 30 days. His earthly remains will be interred in Père-Lachaise Cemetery, Paris.
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February 25, 1829: After a benefit performance in which both of them take part at the Théâtre Favart, Harriet Smithson informs Hector Berlioz (25), through her landlord M. Tartes, that she wants nothing to do with him and that he should stop pestering her. “Then it’s quite impossible?” Berlioz asks. “Oh, monsieur, nothing is more impossible,” comes the reply.
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February 26, 1829: Il giovedi grasso o Il nuovo Pourceaugnac, a farsa by Gaetano Donizetti (31) to words of Gilardoni, is performed for the first time, in Teatro del Fondo, Naples.
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March 3, 1829: Since President-elect Andrew Jackson does not pay the customary visit to outgoing President John Quincy Adams, the latter leaves the White House tonight and will not attend the inauguration tomorrow.
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March 4, 1829: Andrew Jackson replaces John Quincy Adams as President of the United States. The 21st Congress convenes in Washington. Supporters of Andrew Jackson increase their majority in the House of Representatives and hold on to a slim margin in the Senate.
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March 4, 1829: King George IV grants an audience to the Duke of Wellington (Prime Minister), Sir Robert Peel, and Baron Lyndhurst at Windsor Castle. After almost six hours, Wellington is convinced that the king is mad.
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March 5, 1829: Franz Schubert’s (†0) Hymnus an den Heiligen Geist D.964 for male chorus, soloists, chorus, and winds to words of Schmidt is performed for the first time, in the Landhaussaal, Vienna.
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March 11, 1829: 18:00 Felix Mendelssohn (20) conducts (from the piano) the first performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's (†78) St. Matthew Passion in nearly a century. This performance, in the Berlin Singakademie, is much more successful than the original. Among the standing room only audience are King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia, Georg Friedrich Wilhelm Hegel, Gaspare Spontini (53), Alexander von Humboldt, and Heinrich Heine. The conductor uses a baton for the first time. In the alto section of the chorus is Fanny Mendelssohn (23).
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March 12, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) is received at the Mendelssohn residence in Berlin where he meets Felix (20) and Fanny (23). Wilhelm Hensel draws his portrait.
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March 19, 1829: Home, Sweet Home, or The Ranz des Vaches, an operatic drama with music by Henry R. Bishop (42) to words of Somerset, is performed for the first time, in Covent Garden, London.
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March 21, 1829: A duel is fought between Prime Minister, the Duke of Wellington and the Earl of Winchilsea. Winchelsea challenged Wellington over his support of King’s College London at the same time he supports the Catholic Emancipation Act. No one is hurt.
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March 22, 1829: An agreement between Great Britain, France, and Russia sets the borders of Greece under a Christian ruler, subject to the control of Turkey.
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March 29, 1829: Incidental music to Crabbe’s play Don Juan und Faust by Albert Lortzing (27) is performed for the first time, in Detmold.
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March 31, 1829: Francesco Saverio Castiglioni becomes Pope Pius VIII.
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April 1, 1829: Vicente Ramón Guerrero Saldaña replaces Guadalupe Victoria as President of Mexico. He has already ordered all Spaniards to leave the country.
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April 9, 1829: A dike breaks in Danzig (Gdansk). The ensuing flood kills 1,200 people.
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April 10, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) leaves Berlin, accepting an invitation to London. He first travels to Hamburg with his father and sister Rebecka.
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April 10, 1829: Hector Berlioz (25) sends a copy of Huit scènes de Faust to Goethe. The author, after receiving a negative reaction of the work from Carl-Friedrich Zelter, does not write back.
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April 10, 1829: Charles Valentin Alkan (15) is appointed repetiteur at the Paris Conservatoire. He will soon be appointed assistant professor of solfège.
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April 12, 1829: Alexander von Humboldt begins a scientific expedition into uncharted regions of Siberia.
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April 12, 1829: Daniel Auber (47) is elected a member of the Institut, replacing François Joseph Gossec (†0).
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April 13, 1829: Nicholas Chopin writes to Minister Stanislas Grabowski and the Board of Administration for funds to allow his gifted son Fryderyk (19) to study abroad. Although Grabowski favors the request, the board rejects it saying it is not possible to “squander public funds to encourage such artists.”
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April 13, 1829: The Roman Catholic Relief Bill passes the House of Lords. Catholics are now allowed to vote, sit in Parliament, and hold almost all military, civil, and corporate offices.
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April 18, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) boards the packet Attwood in Hamburg for his first visit to London.
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April 21, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) arrives in London, ten hours late after a rough crossing from Hamburg and engine trouble.
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April 21, 1829: An article called “Reflections on Religious Music” appears in the progressive Catholic weekly Correspondant in Paris. It is signed “H”. The author, Hector Berlioz (25), will become a regular contributor and, starting in June, will be paid.
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April 27, 1829: La belle au bois dormant, a ballet by Ferdinand Hérold (38) to a scenario by Scribe and Aumer, is performed for the first time, in the Paris Opéra.
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April 30, 1829: Publication of Systematische Anweisung zum Fantasieren auf dem Pianoforte op.200 by Carl Czerny (38) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 1, 1829: Jöns Jacob Berzelius writes from Stockholm to the German chemist Friedrich Wöhler that he has discovered a new element, thorium.
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May 2, 1829: Captain Charles Fremantle, RN proclaims the British Swan River Colony at the mouth of that river on the west coast of Australia.
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May 4, 1829: Gioachino Rossini (37) signs a new contract to receive an annual government stipend on top of any musical activities.
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May 5, 1829: Several weaving factories in Manchester are attacked by rioting mobs and their contents destroyed.
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May 8, 1829: Louis Moreau Gottschalk is born in a small house on the corner of Esplanade and Royal Streets in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, first of seven children born to Edward Gottschalk, part owner of a cloth shop, and Aimée-Marie Bruslé, daughter of a baker.
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May 9, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) gives his first performance in Berlin. Fanny Mendelssohn (23) attends, and writes “about this extremely wonderful, incredible Talent, about this man, who has the appearance of an insane murderer, and the movements of an ape. A supernatural, wild genius. He is extremely exciting and provocative.”
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May 14, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) receives the title of Hofkapellmeister from the king of Prussia.
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May 14, 1829: While traveling from Leipzig to Heidelberg to attend the university, Robert Schumann (18) passes through Frankfurt. He walks into a piano store, tells the proprietor he is the valet of an English nobleman interested in buying an instrument, and plays the piano for three hours.
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May 16, 1829: Vincenzo Bellini’s (27) tragedia lirica Zaira to words of Romani after Voltaire is performed for the first time, in the new Teatro Ducale, Parma. It is a failure.
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May 19, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) performs in Posen (Poznan).
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May 20, 1829: Les deux nuits, an opéra comique by Adrien Boieldieu (53) to words of Scribe and Bouilly, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre Ventadour, Paris. A success tonight, it will ultimately fail.
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May 21, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) arrives in Warsaw from Frankfurt-an-der-Oder.
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May 21, 1829: Robert Schumann (18) arrives in Heidelberg from Mannheim, having traveled on foot. Since he exceeded his budget, he has no money for a coach. “My lodgings face the asylum on the right and the Catholic church on the left, so that I’m really in doubt whether one is supposed to go crazy or become a Catholic.”
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May 21, 1829: Duke Peter I of Oldenburg dies in Wiesbaden and is succeeded by his son August.
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May 23, 1829: To clear up the vagaries concerning publishing rights, music publishers meet in Leipzig and sign the Conventional-Akte. Those involved are Johann André, Breitkopf & Härtel, CF Peters, B. Schott’s Söhne, and Nikolaus Simrock.
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May 23, 1829: Cyrill Demian of Vienna receives an Austrian patent for a new instrument he calls an “accordion.”
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May 23, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) performs at a banquet in Warsaw, a day before the coronation of Tsar Nikolay as King of Poland. The Tsar presents him with a diamond ring.
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May 24, 1829: Tsar Nikolay I is crowned King of Poland in Warsaw. Nicolò Paganini (46) performs at the ceremony.
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May 25, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) makes his English conducting debut at a Philharmonic Society concert in the Argyll Rooms with his Symphony no.1. The minuet has been replaced by an orchestral version of the scherzo from his Octet.
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May 27, 1829: Ave maris stella for soprano and orchestra by Felix Mendelssohn (20) is performed for the first time, in the Berlin Marienkirche.
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May 28, 1829: The Duchy of Holstein-Oldenburg becomes the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg under Grand Duke August.
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May 29, 1829: Sir Humphry Davy dies in Geneva at the age of 50.
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May 30, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) performs Carl Maria von Weber’s (†2) Conzertstück in f minor in the Argyll Rooms, London. His performance without music causes amazement among his listeners.
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June 10, 1829: “The Boat Race” is first run between Oxford and Cambridge Universities at Henley on Thames. Oxford wins.
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June 12, 1829: Agnes von Hohenstaufen, a grosse historisch-romantische Oper by Gaspare Spontini (54) to words of Raupach, is performed completely for the first time, in the Royal Opera House, Berlin. See 28 May 1827 and 6 December 1837.
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June 15, 1829: Variations concertantes for cello and piano op.17 by Felix Mendelssohn (20) is performed for the first time, in London.
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June 18, 1829: The Colony of Western Australia is established.
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June 19, 1829: The British Parliament passes An Act for improving the Police in and near the Metropolis. Sponsored by Robert Peel, it creates the modern London Police Force.
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June 27, 1829: British scientist, member of the Royal Society of London, James Smithson dies of natural causes in Genoa. His will stipulates that should his only nephew die without issue, all of his fortune should go to "the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an Establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge."
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June 30, 1829: Russian forces capture Silistria, 100 km southeast of Bucharest, from the Turks.
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July 2, 1829: Russian troops complete their crossing of the Soganli Mountains in eastern Turkey.
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July 2, 1829: Hector Berlioz (25) begins work on his third Prix de Rome attempt, the cantata Cléopatre.
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July 4, 1829: Omnibus service begins in London, created by George Shillibeer.
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July 4, 1829: Lowell Mason (37) directs the music at Boston’s Independence Day celebrations. William L. Garrison gives his first important anti-slavery speech. Also in attendance is John Greenleaf Whittier.
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July 6, 1829: Gaetano Donizetti’s (31) melodramma Elisabetta al castello di Kenilworth to words of Tottola after Hugo and Scribe after Scott is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples.
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July 8, 1829: Abraham Mendelssohn writes to his son Felix (20) in England urging him to adopt the name Bartholdy in place of Mendelssohn, in order to show his Christian faith.
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July 9, 1829: The Turkish defenders of Erzurum in eastern Turkey surrender to the Russians.
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July 13, 1829: Robert Schumann (19) officially matriculates at Heidelberg University.
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July 13, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) organizes a concert in the Argyll Rooms, London to benefit flood victims in Silesia. Many of the great musicians in London take part and the four-hour concert is sold out. This evening, more than any other single event, establishes the love affair between England and Mendelssohn.
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July 18, 1829: Ferdinand Hérold’s (38) opéra comique L’illusion to words of Saint-Georges and Ménissier is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de Ventadour, Paris.
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July 19, 1829: Russian forces cross the River Kamchyk south of Varna and rout the waiting Turks, 250 km north of Constantinople.
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July 19, 1829: After a stay of two months and ten concerts, Nicolò Paganini (46) is given a farewell reception in Warsaw. He is returning to Berlin.
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July 20, 1829: Fryderyk Chopin (19) completes his studies at the Skola Glówna Muzyki.
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July 21, 1829: As soon as exams at Warsaw Conservatory are over, Fryderyk Chopin (19) leaves for Vienna.
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July 22, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) departs London for Edinburgh in the company of his friend Karl Klingemann.
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July 23, 1829: Wojciech Boguslawski dies in Warsaw at the age of 72.
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July 23, 1829: William Austin Burt receive a US patent for a typographer, an early typewriter.
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July 25, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) gives the first of two concerts in Breslau (Wroclaw).
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July 26, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and his friend Karl Klingemann reach Edinburgh. They will spend three days there attending a bagpipe competition, visiting Holyrood Castle and “the Mecca of the Romantics,” Walter Scott’s home in Abbotsford.
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July 27, 1829: 4,000 Spanish troops from Cuba land near Veracruz in the hopes of reestablishing Spanish control over Mexico.
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July 30, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) visits Holyrood Castle, home of Mary Queen of Scots and sight of the murder of Rizzio. Here he is inspired to begin his “Scottish” Symphony.
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July 30, 1829: Hector Berlioz’ (25) entry in the Prix de Rome competition, the cantata Cléopâtre, is performed for the first time. No grand prize is awarded this year. The jury desired to give the prize to Berlioz but, as Adrien Boieldieu (53) will tell him, they could not judge music that they were incapable of understanding.
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July 31, 1829: Fryderyk Chopin (19) arrives in Vienna for the first time.
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July 31, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann make a day long trek from Edinburgh to Walter Scott's home in Abbotsford. Scott is making preparations to travel. “We found Sir Walter in the act of leaving Abbotsford, stared at him like fools, drove 80 miles and lost a day for the sake of at best one half-hour of superficial conversation…It was a bad day.” (Eatock, 40)
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August 1, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann set out on a three-week tour of the Scottish highlands. They travel mostly by foot.
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August 2, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klngemann walk from Perth to Dunkeld. The composer makes a sketch of Birnam Wood.
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August 3, 1829: Guillaume Tell, an opéra by Gioachino Rossini (37) to words of Jouy, Bis and others after Schiller, is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra. The audience gives respectful applause but the critics are effusive in their praise. Although Rossini will live another 39 years, he will never again write an opera.
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August 6, 1829: The Spanish invasion force occupies Tampico, Mexico.
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August 7, 1829: King Charles X confers the Legion of Honor on Gioachino Rossini (37).
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August 7, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann reach Oban on the west coast of Scotland. He looks off shore to the Hebrides Islands and conceives the theme for his overture The Hebrides.
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August 8, 1829: As Fryderyk Chopin (19) is standing outside the Kärntnertortheater in Vienna, speaking with friends, Count Gallenberg walks up to him and asks if he would play for him three days hence. Chopin says yes.
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August 8, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) crosses to the Hebrides island of Staffa, sight of Fingal’s Cave, and the island of Iona.
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August 8, 1829: Jules Auguste Armand Marie, Prince de Polignac replaces Jean Baptiste Silvère Gaye, Vicomte de Martignac as Prime Minister of France.
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August 8, 1829: The British-made Stourbridge Lion locomotive begins operating on track between coal mines at Carbondale, to Honesdale, Pennsylvania.
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August 10, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) reaches Berlin after giving four concerts in Breslau (Wroclaw).
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August 10, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann reach Glasgow. They have traveled the Scottish highlands, mostly on foot, for the last ten days.
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August 10, 1829: Jakob Leuthold and Johann Währen reach the summit of the Finsteraarhorn in Switzerland, a height of 4,273 meters. They are the first to do so.
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August 11, 1829: Fryderyk Chopin (19) plays his first concert in Vienna, to enthusiastic reviews. Among other things, the young Pole gives the first performance of his Variations Brillantes on a Theme by Mozart (Là ci darem la mano). He later remembers, “I was overwhelmed by bravos.”
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August 11, 1829: The first child of Gaetano Donizetti (31) dies in Rome at the age of 13 days.
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August 12, 1829: The town of Perth is founded in Western Australia by British settlers.
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August 12, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann travel from Glasgow to Loch Lomond where Mendelssohn sketches the lake.
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August 13, 1829: Gioachino Rossini (37) and his wife leave Paris for Bologna.
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August 14, 1829: King George IV grants a royal charter to King’s College, London. Supporters see it as a Church of England alternative to secular University College, London.
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August 15, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann depart Glasgow by coach, heading south.
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August 15, 1829: White residents of Cincinnati run amok in black districts. Homes are destroyed and many blacks beaten. As many as 1,500 blacks leave town.
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August 16, 1829: 17-year-old conjoined twins Chang and Eng arrive in Boston from their home in Siam. They begin a three-year exhibition tour in the west.
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August 17, 1829: Mexican defenders fall back from Altamira and the Spanish invaders take the town.
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August 18, 1829: Due to the success of his 11 August concert, Fryderyk Chopin (19) plays a second successful concert in Vienna, premiering his Rondo á la Krakowiak.
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August 19, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) and Karl Klingemann reach Liverpool from Scotland.
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August 19, 1829: After two very successful concerts, Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin (19) leaves Vienna for Warsaw.
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August 20, 1829: The Turkish governor surrenders Adrianople (Edirne), 212 km northwest of Constantinople, to the Russians.
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August 20, 1829: Robert Schumann (19) departs from Heidelberg on a journey to Switzerland and Italy.
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August 21, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) reaches Mold, Flintshire in Wales where he will stay for a week at the summer home of an acquaintance, a mine owner named John Taylor. His friend Karl Klingemann has gone on to London. Here he composes three Fantasias op.16.
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August 21, 1829: A Mexican army under Santa Anna attacks the Spanish in Tampico but is unable to take the town.
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August 21, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) arrives in Frankfurt-am-Main from Kassel where he was the guest of Louis Spohr. He gave one concert in Kassel, without great success.
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August 25, 1829: After travelling from Vienna to Prague to Toeplitz to Dux, Fryderyk Chopin (19) and his companions arrive in Dresden.
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August 25, 1829: The United States offers to buy Texas from Mexico for 5,000,000 pesos.
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August 26, 1829: Stopping in Milan on his way from Paris to Bologna, Gioacchino Rossini (37) seeks out Vincenzo Bellini (27) at his home and the two meet for the first time. They have nothing but compliments for each other. Rossini goes on to spread his praise for Bellini throughout the city.
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August 31, 1829: Mathias Rosenblad replaces Fredrik Gyllenborg as Prime Minister for Justice of Sweden.
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September 6, 1829: Gioachino Rossini (37) and his wife arrive in Bologna from Paris.
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September 6, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) arrives back in London from Scotland.
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September 10, 1829: Mexicans assault the Spanish at La Barra and will take it tomorrow.
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September 11, 1829: General Isidro Barradas, commander of the Spanish invasion force, comes to terms with Mexican General Santa Anna. The 1,800 Spanish survivors will be allowed to leave the country without impediment.
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September 12, 1829: Gott segne den König, a cantata by Gaspare Spontini (54) to words of Herklotz, is performed for the first time, in Halle.
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September 12, 1829: Fryderyk Chopin (19) arrives back in Warsaw from his two triumphant performances in Vienna. Unfortunately, the local papers have misrepresented his success as a failure.
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September 14, 1829: The Treaty of Adrianople (Edirne) ends war between Russia and the Ottoman Empire. The Russian border is extended to the southernmost branch of the Danube delta. Russia annexes Akhalkalaki and Akhalkhitze. All other conquered territories are restored.
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September 17, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) is involved in a carriage accident in London and injures his knee. He will be confined to bed for two months, causing him to miss the wedding of his sister Fanny (23) on 3 October.
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September 29, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (46) visits Goethe at Weimar.
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September 29, 1829: Members of the Greater London Metropolitan Police first appear on the streets, established by an Act of Parliament in June. Their headquarters are established in Scotland Yard, near Charing Cross. Their creation was the work of Home Secretary Sir Robert Peel. Jeering political opponents of Sir Robert dub the policemen “bobbies.”
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October 1, 1829: Wilhelm Hensel and Fanny Mendelssohn (23) sign a wedding contract in Berlin with her parents. Fanny’s share of the family fortune is judged to be 19,000 thalers. Her father Abraham agrees to add a yearly stipend of 1,500 thalers.
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October 1, 1829: Isaure, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (26), is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre des Nouveautés, Paris.
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October 2, 1829: At a wedding-eve celebration in Berlin, it is noted that the organ piece to be played tomorrow as a postlude can not be found. The groom, Wilhelm Hensel, suggests that the bride, Fanny Mendelssohn (23) compose a replacement. She does, finishing after midnight.
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October 3, 1829: 16:00 Fanny Mendelssohn (23) marries the Prussian court painter Wilhelm Hensel in the Parochial-Kirche, Berlin. She has written her own music for the occasion, an organ processional in F, as well as the recessional in G composed last night.
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October 4, 1829: Having secured four concert dates in Leipzig for Nicolò Paganini (46), Friedrich Wieck reintroduces himself to the master in his Leipzig hotel. Wieck brings along his daughter Clara (10) who plays a polonaise of her own composition. Paganini is complementary toward her playing.
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October 4, 1829: Mass in E flat D.950 for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Franz Schubert (†0) is performed for the first time, in the Dreifaltigkeitskirche at Alsergrund, Vienna.
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October 6, 1829: The Liverpool-Manchester Railway holds an engine competition at Rainhill, England before 10,000 people. Of the five engines tried, Robert Stephenson’s Rocket was judged to be the best, averaging 22 km per hour over 100 km.
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October 10, 1829: Maria Anna (Nannerl) Mozart dies in Salzburg at the age of 78.
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October 12, 1829: After four successful concerts in ten days, Nicolò Paganini (46) departs Leipzig for Halle.
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October 17, 1829: The Delaware and Chesapeake Canal is opened linking the Delaware River with Chesapeake Bay.
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October 20, 1829: Robert Schumann (19) arrives back in Heidelberg after a tour of Switzerland and northern Italy.
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October 24, 1829: Giuseppe Verdi (16) applies for the position of organist at Soragna, Parma. He will not be hired.
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October 30, 1829: Goethe hears Nicolò Paganini (47) play in Weimar with an orchestra conducted by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (50). “In relation to this pillar of flame and cloud I had no base for what is known as enjoyment...All I heard was something akin to a meteor, and then was unable to account for it. All the same it is strange to hear people--especially women--talking about it. With no hesitation they say out loud what are effectively confessions.”
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November 1, 1829: The Concert des sylphes from Huit scènes de Faust by Hector Berlioz (25) is performed for the first time, in the Salle du Conservatoire, Paris.
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November 6, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) leaves his London lodgings for the first time in six weeks. He has been laid up since his accident of 17 September.
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November 7, 1829: Le dilettante d’Avignon, an opéra comique by Fromental Halévy (30) to words of Hoffman and the composer’s brother Leon, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre Ventadour, Paris. It is Halévy’s first true success.
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November 7, 1829: Frenchman Marc Seguin successfully tests a locomotive based on his improvements to the George Stephenson engines.
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November 14, 1829: A setting of Hora est for chorus and organ by Felix Mendelssohn (20) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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November 14, 1829: Maria Beatrice Ricciarda, Duchess of Massa and Princess of Carrara, dies in Vienna.  She is succeeded by her son, Francesco IV.
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November 16, 1829: The house of Samuel Wesley (63) is set upon by several law officers sent by his creditors. Wesley manages to escape to a friend’s house.
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November 17, 1829: Samuel Wesley (63) once again avoids his creditors by traveling to Watford in Hertfordshire where he is to give a concert.
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November 17, 1829: The Night before the Wedding and the Wedding Night, a comic opera with music by Henry R. Bishop to words of Fitzball, is performed for the first time, in Covent Garden, London, on the eve of the composer’s 43rd birthday. It is an adaptation of Boieldieu’s (53) Les deux nuits.
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November 18, 1829: The Leipzig Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung calls Fryderyk Chopin (19) “one of the brightest meteors on the musical horizon.”
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November 25, 1829: At the conclusion of his last concert in Munich, Nicolò Paganini (47) is crowned with laurels by the conductor Johann Hartmann Stuntz. The virtuoso bursts into tears.
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November 28, 1829: Anton Grigoryevich Rubinstein is born in an inn in Vikhvatinets, Russia (Ribnita, Moldova), the third of five children born to Grigory Romanovich Rubinstein, a farmer, and Kaleriya Khristoforovna Levenstein.
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November 28, 1829: The Philharmonic Society of London names Felix Mendelssohn (20) as an honorary member.
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November 28, 1829: Emmeline, an opéra comique by Ferdinand Hérold (38) to words of Planard, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de Ventadour, Paris.
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November 29, 1829: After two months convalescence, Felix Mendelssohn (20) leaves England for Berlin.
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November 29, 1829: Gott im Ungewitter D.985, a vocal quartet by Franz Schubert (†1) is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Redoutensaal.
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November 29, 1829: Samuel Sebastian Wesley (19) is appointed organist at St. John, Waterloo Road, London.
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November 30, 1829: After five years of work, the Welland Canal opens. It connects Lake Ontario with Lake Erie, allowing vessels to avoid Niagara Falls.
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December 4, 1829: William Henry Cavendish-Bentinck, Governor-General of British India, bans the Hindu practice of Sati, where a widow throws herself, or is thrown, onto the funeral pyre of her husband.
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December 4, 1829: Vice President Anastasio Bustamante y Oseguera rises against President Guerrero of Mexico at Jalapa (Veracruz).
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December 5, 1829: Meeting on the Isle of Man, 15 delegates form the Grand General Union of all Operative Cotton Spinners in the United Kingdom.
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December 7, 1829: Felix Mendelssohn (20) arrives home in Berlin from Britain.
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December 17, 1829: José María Bacanegra replaces Vicente Ramón Guerrero Saldaña as interim President of Mexico.
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December 18, 1829: Nicolò Paganini (47) is made an honorary member of the Museum Gesellschaft of Frankfurt.
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December 18, 1829: In the face of the uprising by Vice President Bustamante, President Vicente Ramón Guerrero Saldaña flees Mexico City to organize opposition in the south.
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December 20, 1829: Il genio dell’armonia for solo voices and chorus by Gaetano Donizetti (32) to words of Visconti, is performed for the first time, in Rome, to honor Pope Pius VIII.
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December 22, 1829: Der Templer und die Jüdin, a romantic opera by Heinrich August Marschner (34) to words of Wohlbrück after Scott, is performed for the first time, in Leipzig Stadttheater.
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December 23, 1829: A triumvirate takes over the presidency of Mexico, consisting of Pedro Vélez, Lucas Igacio de Paula Alamán y Escalada and Luis de Quintanar Soto Bocanegra y Ruíz.
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December 26, 1829: Two new works by the Mendelssohn siblings are performed for the first time, at the Berlin home of the composers’ parents, in honor of their silver wedding anniversary: Die Heimkehr aus der Fremde, a liederspiel by Felix Mendelssohn (20) to words of Klingemann, and Festspiel for vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra by Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel (24) to words of her husband, Wilhelm Hensel.
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December 29, 1829: Giacomo Meyerbeer (38) signs his first contract with the Paris Opéra.