A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1827 – December 31, 1827

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January 1, 1827: A contract is signed by Gioachino Rossini (34) making him Premier Compositeur du Roi and Inspecteur Général du Chant en France, honorary positions. This will allow him to give up his duties at the Théâtre-Italien and spend more time composing for the Opéra.
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January 2, 1827: Karl van Beethoven, nephew of the composer (56), joins the Austrian army as a cadet in Field Marshal von Stutterheim’s regiment.
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January 5, 1827: An die untergehende Sonne, a song by Franz Schubert (29) to words of Kosegarten, is published by Diabelli, Vienna as his op.44.
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January 5, 1827: Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, and heir apparent to the thrones of Great Britain and Hannover, dies in London at the age of 63.
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January 7, 1827: Olivo e Pasquale, a melodramma by Gaetano Donizetti (29) to words of Ferretti after Sografi, is performed for the first time, in the Teatro Valle, Rome. The audience response is frigid.
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January 8, 1827: Ludwig van Beethoven (56) undergoes a second operation to remove excess abdominal fluid.
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January 11, 1827: An schwager Kronos D.369, a song by Franz Schubert (29) to words of Goethe, is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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January 15, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) performs before 1,200 people in the National Theatre, Warsaw. It is likely that Fryderyk Chopin (16) is in the audience.
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January 17, 1827: Lucretia, an opera by Heinrich August Marschner (31) to words of Eckschlager, is performed for the first time, in the Danzig (Gdansk) Danzigertheater.
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January 23, 1827: François-Adrien Boieldieu (51) marries his second wife, Jeanne Philis-Bertin, an opera singer, in Jarcy. They have been living together for several years. Luigi Cherubini (66) is a witness.
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January 25, 1827: Nachthelle D.892 for tenor, male chorus, and piano by Franz Schubert (29) is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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January 27, 1827: Franz Schubert (29) is informed of his failure to secure the post of Vice-Hofkapellmeister to the Imperial Court Chapel.
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January 27, 1827: Englishmen in India, a comic opera by Henry R. Bishop (40) to words of Dimond, is performed for the first time, in the Little Theatre in the Haymarket, London.
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January 29, 1827: Astolphe et Joconde, a ballet by Ferdinand Hérold (36) to a scenario by Aumer, is performed for the first time, in the Paris Opéra.
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January 30, 1827: Violin Concerto no.2 by Nicolò Paganini (44) is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples, the composer as soloist.
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January 30, 1827: L’artisan, an opéra comique by Fromental Halévy (27) to words of Saint Georges, is performed for the first time, by the Opéra-Comique, Paris. It is not successful.
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February 2, 1827: Ludwig van Beethoven (56) undergoes a third operation to remove excess abdominal fluid.
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February 2, 1827: A cantata for the birthday of Grand Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) is performed for the first time.
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February 7, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) gives a second concert in the National Theatre, Warsaw.
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February 8, 1827: Franz Schubert’s (30) Lied des gefangenen Jägers D.843 to words of Scott translated by Storck is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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February 13, 1827: Revue musicale is published for the first time, in Paris.
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February 17, 1827: British Prime Minister Robert Jenkinson, Earl of Liverpool is found paralyzed in his breakfast room, the victim of a stroke. He will never resume his duties.
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February 20, 1827: Argentine and Uruguayan forces rout Brazilians at Ituzaingó, 57 km north of Montevideo.
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February 20, 1827: Two works by Felix Mendelssohn (18) are performed for the first time, in Stettin (Szczecin), conducted by Carl Loewe (30): Concerto in A flat for two pianos and orchestra and the Overture “A Midsummer Night's Dream.”  The composer plays one piano in the concerto and conducts the overture. His music is a great success but is overshadowed by the second half of the program, the Symphony no. 9 of Ludwig van Beethoven (56), performed for the first time in northern Germany. Mendelssohn plays first violin. (The concerto could have been performed earlier, at a family concert in Berlin.)
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February 27, 1827: Ludwig van Beethoven (56) undergoes a fourth operation to remove abdominal fluids.
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February 28, 1827: The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad is chartered in the State of Maryland.
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March 1, 1827: The theatre at the Salle de la Bourse opens in Paris.
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March 2, 1827: Diabelli and Co., Vienna publishes Franz Schubert’s (30) Mignon songs D.877, to words of Goethe, as his op.62.
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March 5, 1827: Pierre-Simon Laplace dies in Paris at the age of 77.
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March 5, 1827: Alessandro Volta dies in Como at the age of 82.
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March 8, 1827: A day after arriving in Vienna on a concert tour, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) visits the home of his close friend, Ludwig van Beethoven (56), now on his deathbed.
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March 8, 1827: Two works by Franz Schubert (30) are performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna: Gott in der Natur D.757, a vocal quartet to words of von Kleist, and Normans Gesang D.846, a song to words of Scott translated by Storck.
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March 9, 1827: Le hussard de Felsheim, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (23) to words of Deupeuty, Villeneuve, and Vilain de Saint-Hilaire, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de Vaudeville, Paris.
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March 10, 1827: Le loup-garou, an opéra-comique by Louise Bertin (22) to words of Scribe and Mazères, is performed for the first time, at the Opéra-Comique, Paris. It is part of a benefit for the poor of Paris. Although applauded early on, by the end there are demonstrations against the work, perhaps orchestrated by opponents of the periodical owned by the composer’s father, Le Journal des débats. The press is not kind.
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March 11, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) performs at the City Theatre in Riga on her way to St. Petersburg.
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March 13, 1827: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) visits Ludwig van Beethoven (56) on his deathbed, one of four visits by Hummel this month. They share a glass of wine.
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March 15, 1827: A royal charter is granted for King’s College to be founded in York, Upper Canada. (eventually the University of Toronto)
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March 16, 1827: A diploma dated today creates Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) a chevalier of the Legion of Honor. See 3 November 1826.
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March 19, 1827: A group of Viennese music-lovers, including Franz Schubert (30), visit the ailing Ludwig van Beethoven (56) on his deathbed. For the two composers, who have shared the same city for the last 30 years, it is their first and only meeting.
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March 20, 1827: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) and his wife Elisabeth visit Ludwig van Beethoven (48) on his deathbed. Beethoven can only speak in whispers.
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March 23, 1827: With great difficulty, Ludwig van Beethoven (56) signs a will. He leaves his entire estate to his nephew Karl. During the final visit of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48), Beethoven tells him that he expects death soon.
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March 24, 1827: Ludwig van Beethoven (56) receives the last rites of the Roman Catholic Church. In the evening he loses consciousness.
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March 26, 1827: Late afternoon. Ludwig van Beethoven dies in his home at Schwarzspanierstraße 15 in Vienna, Empire of Austria, of liver failure caused by cirrhosis, aged 56 years, three months and ten days, and 49 years to the day after his first public performance. True to his turbulent life and the disruptive impact he will exert on the tonal art, the day is marked by a snowfall followed by a thunderstorm at the time of his passing.
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March 26, 1827: Moïse et Pharaon, ou Le passage de la Mer rouge, an opera by Gioachino Rossini (35) to words of Balocchi and de Jouy after Tottola, is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra, to a wildly enthusiastic reception.
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March 27, 1827: An autopsy is conducted on the body of Ludwig van Beethoven by Dr. Johann Wagner.
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March 29, 1827: A large crowd gathers around the Schwarzspanierhaus in Vienna where the body of Beethoven lies. Among the spectators are many children, as school has been cancelled for the day. The authorities feel it necessary to call in soldiers to control the large number of people. Inside, nine priests bless the body and a chorale is sung. At 15:00 the procession to the church begins. A military band plays an arrangement of Beethoven’s funeral march from the Piano Sonata op.26. 15-20,000 people watch the procession take one and a half hours to go a little more than a block to Trinity Church of the Minorities. Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48), Carl Czerny (36), and Franz Schubert (30) are among the mourners. A carriage takes the coffin to Währing Cemetery where a funeral oration by Franz Grillparzer is read by Heinrich Anschütz, and the earthly remains of Ludwig van Beethoven are laid to rest.
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April 1, 1827: The Shepherd’s Calendar by John Clare is published this month.
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April 2, 1827: Publication of the Grande rondeau concertant op.25 for piano by Jan Václav Vorísek (†1) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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April 3, 1827: Pope Leo XII creates Nicolò Paganini (44) a Knight of the Golden Spur in Rome.
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April 3, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) performs at Philharmonic Hall, St. Petersburg before Tsar Nikolay.
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April 3, 1827: A memorial service for Ludwig van Beethoven takes place in the Church of Augustinerkirche, Vienna. The Requiem of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†35) is performed.
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April 5, 1827: Vincenzo Bellini (25) departs Naples for Milan and Teatro alla Scala.
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April 5, 1827: Adam and Franz Liszt (15) depart Paris for another trip to Britain.
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April 5, 1827: A second memorial service for Ludwig van Beethoven takes place in the Karlskirche, Vienna. The Requiem of Luigi Cherubini (66) is performed.
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April 7, 1827: John Walker, a chemist in Stockton-on-Tees, England, sells friction matches for the first time. He recently invented them by treating sticks with chemicals and letting them dry.
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April 7, 1827: A concert in honor of Ludwig van Beethoven (†0) takes place in Vienna. Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) improvises variations on the second movement of Beethoven’s Symphony no.7.
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April 8, 1827: Richard Geyer (Wagner) (13) is confirmed in the Kreuzkirche, Dresden.
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April 8, 1827: Adam and Franz Liszt (15) arrive in London.
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April 8, 1827: Two days of fighting between Argentine and Brazilian warships in the Rio de la Plata result in a Brazilian victory in the Battle of Monte Santiago.
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April 10, 1827: George Canning replaces Robert Banks Jenkinson, Earl of Liverpool, as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
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April 10, 1827: Fryderyk Chopin’s (17) sister Emilia dies of tuberculosis. It is possible that he caught the disease from her.
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April 11, 1827: The Berliner Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung issue dated today features a black border on the cover and the simple phrase “Beethoven is dead.”
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April 12, 1827: Vincenzo Bellini (25) arrives in Milan from Naples with a contract to produce an opera.
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April 12, 1827: Giacomo Meyerbeer (35) and Eugène Scribe submit the libretto of Robert le diable to the French censors. It will take four days to pass them.
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April 16, 1827: The Octet in F D.803 of Franz Schubert (30) is performed publicly for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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April 22, 1827: String Quartet op.130 by Ludwig van Beethoven (†0) is performed for the first time with the new ending, in Vienna. See 21 March 1826.
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April 22, 1827: Nachtgesang im Walde D.913 for male vocal quartet and four horns by Franz Schubert (30) is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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April 23, 1827: Publication of the Gradual Quod quod in orbe op.88 and the Offertorium op.89a, both for chorus and orchestra, by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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April 23, 1827: Undergraduate William Rowan Hamilton presents the Theory of Systems and Rays to the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin. One of the great works on optics, it presents a single function unifying mechanics, optics, and mathematics and helps establish the wave theory of light.
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April 25, 1827: Piano Trio no.1 op.105 by Carl Czerny (36) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 29, 1827: King Charles X of France dissolves the National Guard.
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April 29, 1827: Die Hochzeit des Camacho, a singspiel by Felix Mendelssohn (18) to words of Klingemann after Cervantes, is performed for the first time, in the Royal Theatre, Berlin. Although the press reaction is encouraging, the work is not a success and the composer leaves the theatre before the final curtain. He will never write another opera.
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April 29, 1827: Georg Simon Ohm, a physics and mathematics teacher in Cologne, dates the foreword to his book Die galvanische Kette mathematisch bearbeitet. In it he describes his discovery that the amount of electricity transmitted through a conductor is directly proportional to the potential difference, and inversely proportional to the resistance. This is hereafter known as “Ohm’s Law” and is the beginning of the understanding of electrical resistance.
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April 29, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) takes part in a performance at the palace of Countess Daria A. Dierzhavina in St. Petersburg.
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April 30, 1827: At the height of an argument in Algiers, Governor Hussein Dey slaps French Consul Pierre Deval in the face with a fly swatter. This will bring a French blockade of the city, and eventually the conquest of Algeria by the French.
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May 2, 1827: The Allgemeine muskalische Zeitung publishes a report that Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) will be succeeding Carl Maria von Weber (†0) as Kapellmeister in Dresden. It will be widely reported elsewhere. The report is erroneous.
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May 5, 1827: King Friedrich August I of Saxony dies in Dresden and is succeeded by his brother Anton.
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May 6, 1827: A Turkish (mostly Albanian) force defeats the last Greek army in the field at Phalerum (Palaion Faliron) near Athens forcing the Greek government to fall and resulting in general chaos.
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May 6, 1827: Im Freien D.880, a song by Franz Schubert (30) to words of Seidl, is performed for the first time, in the Festsaal of Vienna University.
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May 8, 1827: Felix Mendelssohn (18) matriculates at the University of Berlin.
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May 10, 1827: Regina Hitzelberger-Lang dies in Munich at the age of 39. Her income as a vocalist brought needed income into the family, and her departure requires her talented daughter Josephine Lang (12) to begin giving piano lessons.
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May 11, 1827: Count Viktor Pavlovich Kochubey replaces Prince Pyotr Vasilyevich Lopukhin as Chairman of the Committee of Ministers of Russia.
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May 12, 1827: L’héritière e t l’orpheline, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (23) to words of Anne and Henry de Tully, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de Vaudeville, Paris.
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May 13, 1827: Gaetano Donizetti’s (29) opera romantica Otto mesi in due ore ossia Gli esiliati in Siberia to words of Gilardoni after Pixérécourt is performed for the first time, in Teatro Nuovo, Naples.
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May 15, 1827: Perkin Warbeck, ou Le commis marchand, an opera by Adolphe Adam (23) to words of Tháulon, Brazier, and Carmouche, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Gymnase-Dramatique, Paris.
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May 16, 1827: Two songs by Franz Schubert (30) to words of Pyrker are published by Haslinger as his op.79: Das Heimweh and Die Allmacht.
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May 20, 1827: Zarafa, a gift from Muhammed Ali Pasha of Egypt to King Charles X and the first giraffe ever seen in France begins the walk from Marseille to Paris. Muhammed Ali sent the gift in an effort to dissuade Charles from supporting the Greeks.
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May 21, 1827: Franz Liszt (15) gives the first concert on this trip to England in the New Argyll Rooms, London.
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May 25, 1827: Franz Liszt (15) gives a concert in the New Argyll Rooms, London attended by Muzio Clementi (75).
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May 25, 1827: Five songs by Franz Schubert (30) are published by Haslinger: Der Wanderer an den Mond, Das Zügenglöcklein, and Im Freien, all to words of Seidl, as his op.80, and Alinde and An die Laute, both to words of Rochlitz, as his op.81.
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May 28, 1827: The first act of Agnes von Hohenstaufen, a lyrisches Drama by Gaspare Spontini (52) to words of Raupach, is performed for the first time, in the Royal Opera House, Berlin. See 12 June 1829 and 6 December 1837.
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June 4, 1827: The first university cricket match takes place at Lord’s. Oxford and Cambridge end in a tie.
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June 5, 1827: Greek defenders of the Acropolis surrender to surrounding Turks.
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June 6, 1827: 30,000 people turn out to see Zarafa the giraffe on her walk from Marseille to Paris.
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June 8, 1827: Manuel Francisco de Barros de Sousa da Mesquita de Macedo Leitão e Carvalhosa, visconde de Santarém replaces Francisco Alexandro Lobo, Bisop de Viseu as Secretary of State (prime minister) of Portugal.
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June 12, 1827: Franz Schubert (30) is elected a full member of the Vienna Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde.
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June 18, 1827: Hoping to placate his Roman Catholic subjects, King Willem I of the Netherlands enters into a concordat with Pope Leo XII.
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June 23, 1827: Two songs by Franz Schubert (30) are published in the Zeitschrift für Kunst, Vienna: Trost im Liede D.546 to words of Schober, and the second setting of Wandrers Nachtlied D.756 to words of Goethe.
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July 1, 1827: The Christian Year by John Keble is published.
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July 4, 1827: As a result of a law passed ten years ago, slavery is abolished in New York State.
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July 6, 1827: A Treaty for the Pacification of Greece is signed by Great Britain, France, and Russia in London. The signatories promise to aid the Greeks unless Turkey agrees to an armistice.
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July 9, 1827: 100,000 Parisians watch the arrival of Zarafa the giraffe to their city. She has walked with a large entourage from Marseille since 20 May. She is presented to King Charles at Saint-Cloud as a gift from Muhammed Ali Pasha of Egypt in an attempt to dissuade Charles from supporting the Greeks. Zarafa will be housed in the Jardin des Plantes. It is the first giraffe ever seen in France and will cause a giraffe craze in fashion, furniture, and pottery.
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July 12, 1827: The Rencontre, or Love Will Find Out the Way, an operatic comedy with music by Henry R. Bishop (40) to words of Planché, is performed for the first time, in the Little Theatre in the Haymarket, London.
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July 16, 1827: Gioachino Rossini’s (35) Cantata per il battesimo del figlio del banchiere Aguado is performed for the first time, in the Paris home of Alexandre-Marie Aguado.
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July 28, 1827: Hector Berlioz (23) and three other Prix de Rome candidates receive their examination poem, The Death of Orpheus, and are directed to their loges.
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July 28, 1827: The University of Marburg confers an honorary doctorate on Louis Spohr (43).
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August 6, 1827: A treaty between the United States and Great Britain stipulates a joint occupation of the Oregon territory.
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August 6, 1827: Three songs by Franz Schubert (30) are published by Pennauer as his op.84 (later corrected to op.87): Der Unglückliche to words of Pichler, the second setting of Hoffnung, and the third setting of Der Jüngling am Bache, both to words of Schiller.
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August 8, 1827: British Prime Minister George Canning dies at his house in Chiswick.
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August 11, 1827: Ständchen D.920 for alto, female chorus and piano by Franz Schubert (30) to words of Grillparzer is performed for the first time, at the home of Louise Gosmar in Döbling. Schubert was invited to attend but has forgotten about it.
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August 12, 1827: William Blake dies in London, aged 69.
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August 19, 1827: Il borgomastro di Saardam, a melodramma giocoso by Gaetano Donizetti (29) to words of Gilardoni after Mélesville, Merle, and Boirie, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Nuovo, Naples. The audience is enthusiastic.
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August 25, 1827: During the performance of Hector Berlioz’ (23) Prix de Rome cantata entry on The Death of Orpheus, the accompanist, Rifaud, breaks down and the music has to be abandoned. The jury decides that the work is unplayable and the matter is closed. In the awarding of prizes, it is not even mentioned.
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August 28, 1827: While Franz Liszt (15) and his father are in Boulogne for the sea baths, the elder man dies suddenly of typhoid fever. Liszt agrees to pay all his debts and begins life on his own.
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August 31, 1827: Frederick John Robinson, Viscount Goderich becomes Prime Minister the United Kingdom, replacing George Canning who died 8 September.
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September 2, 1827: Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka (23) and three others organize a serenade on the Little Chernaya River, St. Petersburg. Situated on a launch in the river, Glinka directs a chorus and accompanies them on piano. Military musicians play from the launch and in the breaks, fireworks go off from another launch. Crowds of people line the banks for the performance from nine till midnight.
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September 3, 1827: Having moved back to Boston from Savannah last month, Lowell Mason (35) is elected President of the Boston Handel and Haydn Society.
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September 4, 1827: Franz Schubert (30) and Johann Baptist Jenger arrive in Graz from Vienna.
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September 5, 1827: Fire destroys three-quarters of the City of Turku, Finland.
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September 7, 1827: Principe Miguel de Bragança becomes “Governor of the Kingdom” replacing Manuel Francisco de Barros de Sousa da Mesquita de Macedo Leitão e Carvalhosa, visconde de Santarém as head of government of Portugal.
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September 7, 1827: Tsar Nikolay I of Russia decrees that Jews are now liable for military service but at a higher rate than Gentiles.
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September 7, 1827: The longest rail line in the world (53 km) opens between Trojanov and Budweiss, Bohemia (Ceské Budejovice, Czech Republic).  When completed to Linz in 1832, it will connect the Danube with the Vltava, effectively joining the North Sea with the Black Sea.
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September 8, 1827: Mon ami Pierre, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (24) to words of Dartois, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre des Nouveautés, Paris.
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September 9, 1827: Egyptian ships land troops at Navarino to help put down the rebellion in Greece.
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September 9, 1827: A big charity concert in honor of Franz Schubert (30) takes place in the Landständisches-Theater, Graz, organized by the Styrian Musical Society, of which he is an honorary member. The proceeds go to help recent flood victims.
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September 11, 1827: Clara Wieck (7) plays a concerto for the first time in public, at an orchestral rehearsal before a small invited audience in Leipzig. She plays a concerto by Mozart (†35) in E flat.
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September 11, 1827: On his first trip to see a production of Shakespeare, Hector Berlioz (23) first lays eyes on Harriet Smithson, playing Ophelia in Hamlet at the Théâtre de l’Odéon. The composer later remembers that this is the beginning of “the supreme drama of my life...The impression made on my heart and mind by her extraordinary talent, nay her dramatic genius, was equaled only by the havoc wrought in me by the poet she so nobly interpreted.” As for Ms. Smithson, it is her first performance in France. She is an overnight sensation.
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September 12, 1827: Three Italian Songs for bass voice by Franz Schubert (30) to words of Metastasio are published by Haslinger as his op.83.
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September 12, 1827: Frédéric Kalkbrenner (41) marries Marie d'Estaing, the daughter of a general, in Paris.
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September 19, 1827: Ferdinand Hérold’s (36) ballet La somnambule to a scenario by Scribe and Aumer is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra.
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September 20, 1827: Music publisher Carl Friedrich Peters dies in Sonnenstein at the age of 48. He leaves his firm to his daughter Anna, who is only eleven years old. See 29 October 1828.
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September 22, 1827: This is the day that 22-year-old Joseph Smith says he received golden plates from an angel in Palmyra, New York, from which he will translate the Book of Mormon.
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September 24, 1827: Franz Schubert (30) and Johann Baptist Jenger arrive back in Vienna from Graz.
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September 25, 1827: Der blinde Knabe D.833, a song by Franz Schubert (30) to words of Cibber translated by Craigher, is published in the Zeitschrift für Kunst, Vienna.
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September 29, 1827: Great Britain and the United States agree to submit their boundary question to arbitration.
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October 1, 1827: Russian troops occupy Yerevan.
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October 13, 1827: When Carl Friedrich Zelter tells Goethe that his student, Fanny Mendelssohn (21), is having trouble finding a suitable text for a song, the elderly poet writes out eight lines and asks Zelter to bring them to her. (These may be new, or something he has already written)
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October 13, 1827: Pietro von Abano, a romantic opera by Louis Spohr (43) to words of Pfeiffer after Tieck, is performed for the first time, in the Kassel Hoftheater.
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October 18, 1827: A model of a screw propeller, invented by Robert Wilson, is presented to a meeting of the Dunbar Mechanic’s Institute in Scotland.
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October 20, 1827: After an Egyptian ship kills the members of a party sent to parley, a naval force consisting of British, French, and Russian ships destroys a Turkish-Egyptian fleet in Navarino Bay. The Moslems lose 60 of their 89 ships, all others being damaged, and the lives of over 8,000 sailors. The Europeans lose 178 men and all their ships survive.
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October 27, 1827: Il pirata, a melodramma by Vincenzo Bellini (25) to words of Romani after Taylor, is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan. It is an immediate hit. He decides to stay in Milan.
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October 28, 1827: Lowell Mason (35) conducts a performance of the Boston Handel and Haydn Society for the first time.
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November 1, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37), her two daughters, and two sisters depart Warsaw to move to Moscow.
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November 3, 1827: Le roi et le batelier, an opéra comique by Fromental Halévy (28) and Victor Rifaut to words of Saint-Georges, is performed for the first time, by the Opéra-Comique, Paris. It receives only 13 performances.
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November 4, 1827: The Salon of 1827 opens at the Louvre including The Death of Sardanapalus by Eugène Delacroix.
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November 5, 1827: The musical effects of Ludwig van Beethoven (†0), including original manuscripts, are auctioned in the Kohlmarkt, Vienna.
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November 9, 1827: Nicolò Paganini (45) performs at Teatro del Falcone, Genoa before King Carlo Felice of Sardinia and members of the royal family.
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November 15, 1827: Creek Indians cede all of their remaining territory in Georgia to the United States.
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November 15, 1827: Monsieur Botte, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (24) to words of Dupeuty and Villeneuve, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre de Vaudeville, Paris.
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November 15, 1827: Ferdinand Hérold (36) marries Adélaïde Elise Rollet in Neuilly-sur-Seine.
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November 19, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) has dinner with John Field (45) in Moscow.  Field is a frequent visitor with Szymanowska in November and December, possibly to help with her concert on 15 December.  The poets Adam Mickiewicz and Alyeksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin also stop in regularly.
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November 21, 1827: Gaetano Donizetti’s (29) farsa Le convenienze teatrali to the composer’s words after Sografi is performed for the first time, in Teatro Nuovo, Naples to good success.
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November 22, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (37) meets the poet Adam Mickiewicz in St. Petersburg. She will set four of his poems to music. After her death, Mickiewicz will marry her daughter Celina.
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November 22, 1827: Hector Berlioz (23) conducts in public for the first time in a performance of his 1825 mass in the Church of Saint-Eustache, Paris.
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November 24, 1827: A second round of voting for the French legislature results in the largest share of seats going to leftists.
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December 3, 1827: The 20th Congress of the United States convenes in Washington. Supporters of General Andrew Jackson hold small majorities in both houses.
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December 6, 1827: Franz Schubert’s (30) song Der Kampf D.594 to words of Schiller is performed for the first time, in the Musikverein, Vienna.
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December 12, 1827: Four songs by Franz Schubert (30) are published by Weigl as his op.88: Abendlied für die Entfernte to words of von Schlegel, Thekla: eine Geisterstimme to words of Schiller, An die Musik to words of Schober, and Um Mitternacht to words of Schulze.
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December 12, 1827: Le Caleb de Walter Scott, a vaudeville by Adolphe Adam (24) to words of Dartois and Planard, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre des Nouveautés, Paris.
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December 12, 1827: Marc Sequin receives a French patent for improvements on the George Stephenson steam engine for railroad use.
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December 15, 1827: Maria Szymanowska (38) gives a very successful concert in Moscow before a large audience.
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December 17, 1827: A dinner and performance in honor of Muzio Clementi (75) takes place at the Albion Hotel, London. All of musical London is there as well as many publishers and businessmen.
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December 17, 1827: Publication of the Fortsetzung des periodischen Werkes: Die Kunst des Fingrsatzes, books 21&22 by Carl Czerny (36) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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December 24, 1827: A document is registered in the name of Nicolò Paganini (45) in which he agrees to pay an annuity to Antonia Bianchi, the mother of his son.
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December 24, 1827: A Kindersymphonie by Felix Mendelssohn (18) for his sister Rebecka is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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December 26, 1827: A Piano Trio, either D.898 or D.929, by Franz Schubert (30) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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December 28, 1827: Le mal du pays, ou La batelière de Brientz, an opera by Adolphe Adam (24) to words of Scribe and Mélesville (pseud. of Duveyrier), is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Gymnase-Dramatique, Paris.