A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1806 – December 31, 1806

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January 1, 1806: Nicolò Paganini (23) is named second violin in the Court Chamber Orchestra of Lucca.
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January 1, 1806: By order of Emperor Napoléon, the Gregorian calendar is reintroduced in France, replacing the revolutionary calendar.
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January 1, 1806: The Duchy of Bavaria is made a kingdom. Elector Maximilian IV of Bavaria becomes King Maximilian I, inaugurating a royal house which will be of great importance to music. At the same time, Duke-Elector Friedrich II of Württemberg becomes King Friedrich I.
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January 4, 1806: The body of Lord Nelson lies in state for three days in the Painted Hall of Greenwich Hospital. 100,000 people will view the remains.
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January 4, 1806: War of the Third Coalition: A British fleet sails into Table Bay at Cape Town. The Dutch Governor Jan Willem Janssens mobilizes the colony.
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January 6, 1806: War of the Third Coalition: British troops begin landing north of Cape Town.
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January 6, 1806: The Duchy of Modena-Breisgau is divided between Baden and Württemberg.
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January 8, 1806: The body of Lord Nelson is transported up the Thames to the Admiralty in Whitehall.
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January 8, 1806: War of the Third Coalition: Invading British forces defeat the Dutch defenders at Blaauwberg (Blouberg) mountain near Cape Town.
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January 9, 1806: The funeral procession for Lord Nelson travels from Whitehall to St. Paul’s Cathedral, watched by thousands of people and 30,000 troops. 7,000 attend the funeral and the coffin is placed in the crypt of the cathedral.
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January 10, 1806: War of the Third Coalition: The Dutch formally surrender Cape Town to the invading British forces.
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January 12, 1806: The war now over, French troops evacuate Vienna.
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January 13, 1806: Commander Francis Beaufort, RN of HMS Woolwich first writes down the wind scale he developed last year. In his log he describes his standardized method for describing wind. Eventually, it will go into common use around the world.
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January 16, 1806: Georg Joseph Vogler’s (56) Castor und Pollux, directed by the composer, is performed in Munich to celebrate the wedding of Napoléon’s adopted son Eugene to August Amalia, daughter of King Maximilian I of Bavaria.  One of the leads is Regina Hitzelberger, who, nine years hence, will give birth to Josephine Lang.
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January 18, 1806: War of the Third Coalition: Governor Janssens surrenders his remaining forces near the Hottentots-Holland and the Cape Colony passes to British control.
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January 19, 1806: According to the terms of the Treaty of Pressburg, France takes control of Venetia for the Kingdom of Italy.
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January 23, 1806: British Prime Minister William Pitt dies of a digestive ailment in Putney at the age of 46.
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January 24, 1806: King Ferdinando IV of Naples flees the city as a French army marches south, sailing for Sicily.
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January 26, 1806: Emperor Napoléon returns to Paris after his defeat of Austria.
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January 28, 1806: Les deux aveugles de Tolède, an opéra comique by Étienne Nicolas Méhul (42) to words of Marsollier des Vivetières after The Thousand and One Nights, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre Feydeau, Paris. It receives 20 performances in Paris but is more successful elsewhere.
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January 30, 1806: The Lower Trenton Bridge opens between Trenton, New Jersey and Morristown, Pennsylvania. It is the first bridge over the Delaware River.
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February 2, 1806: A new chapel is inaugurated by Emperor Napoléon in the northern part of the Tuileries Palace.
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February 2, 1806: Konzertmeister Louis Spohr (21) marries Dorothea Scheidler, the daughter of a court singer, in the court chapel of Gotha, in the presence of Duchess Carolina Amalie.
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February 6, 1806: War of the Third Coalition: British and French ships engage off Santo Domingo. Two French ships are run aground and three captured.
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February 6, 1806: As French troops approach, Francesco, Duke of Calabria, Hereditary Prince of Naples departs the city and moves south.
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February 8, 1806: L’eccelsa gara, a cantata composed by Gaspare Spontini (31) to words of Balocchi to honor the French victory at Austerlitz, is performed for the first time, in the Salle Louvois, Paris.
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February 8, 1806: French forces under Joseph Bonaparte cross the border into the Kingdom of Naples.  They meet no serious resistance, except in Gaeta.  King Ferdinando IV takes refuge in Palermo.
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February 11, 1806: William Wyndham Grenville, Baron Grenville replaces William Pitt as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.
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February 11, 1806: The County of Tirol is annexed to Bavaria.
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February 13, 1806: Frederic Tudor’s first shipment of ice sails from Boston aboard the brig Favorite making for Martinique.
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February 15, 1806: The Treaty of Paris allies France and Prussia against Great Britain and amends the treaty of last 15 December. Prussia closes its ports to British ships in return for the promise of Hannover, a British possession.
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February 15, 1806: French forces occupy Naples.
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February 24, 1806: During Luigi Cherubini’s (45) visit to Vienna, Franz Joseph Haydn (73) dedicates his Symphony no.103 to him, noting this on the autograph manuscript and handing it to him.
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February 25, 1806: Faniska, an opéra comique by Luigi Cherubini (45) to words of Sonnleithner after Pixérécourt, is performed for the first time, in the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna directed by the composer. The audience includes Emperor Franz and the royal family, Franz Joseph Haydn (72) and Ludwig van Beethoven (35). It is a great success and will receive 28 performances.
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March 1, 1806: France annexes the Kingdom of Sicily “this side of the lighthouse”.
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March 2, 1806: John Field (23) makes his highly successful performing debut in Moscow. He will live in Moscow and St. Petersburg for some years.
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March 3, 1806: The dominions of Lucca are extended over all of Tuscany.
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March 5, 1806: The brig Favorite arrives at St. Pierre, Martinique with the first shipment of ice by Frederic Tudor of Boston. Eventually he will be known as the “Ice King” and achieve great wealth.
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March 6, 1806: French forces defeat Neapolitan troops near Campotenese, capturing 2,000 men and all their artillery.
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March 9, 1806: After seven months in the city, Luigi Cherubini (45) departs Vienna to return to Paris.
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March 14, 1806: Emperor Napoléon announces his intention of creating his brother Louis King of Holland.
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March 15, 1806: The Grand Duchy of Cleves and Berg is created. Joachim Murat, brother-in-law to Napoléon, is made Grand Duke.
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March 15, 1806: 17:30 A chondrite meteor (containing carbon and organic-like chemicals) is identified for the first time when one crashes to Earth outside Alaïs, France.
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March 17, 1806: Tout le monde a tort, a vaudeville by Gaspare Spontini (31), is performed for the first time, in Malmaison.
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March 23, 1806: The Lewis and Clark expedition breaks camp at Fort Clatsop (near Astoria, Oregon) and begins the journey home.
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March 27, 1806: The British government is informed that the ports of Prussia and Hannover are barred to British ships.
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March 29, 1806: President Jefferson signs a bill authorizing the building of the Cumberland Road between the Potomac and Ohio Rivers. It is the first road project authorized by the United States government.
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March 29, 1806: Georg Joseph Vogler (56) gives the first of two concerts in Munich he calls a "national-charakteristisches Konzert."  He performs "themes, for which only the ideas were fixed, the execution was left to the performer." (Morgan, 30)  They are mostly themes he says he collected in various travels to non-German speaking lands.  His interpolations will be collected into his publication Polymelos.
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March 29, 1806: The second version of Ludwig van Beethoven’s (35) opera Leonore (Fidelio) to words of Sonnleithner after Bouilly, with the Leonore Overture no.3, is performed for the first time, in the Theater an der Wien, Vienna. This version has a much better reception with critics and public than the first. See 20 November 1805 and 23 May 1814.
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March 30, 1806: The Principality of Guastalla is created subject to French rule under Prince Camillo Filippo Ludovico Principe di Borghese and Pauline Bonaparte. The Duchy of Massa and the Principality of Carrara are restored by the French under Duke and Prince Felice Pasquale Bacciochi.
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March 30, 1806: Joseph Bonaparte, brother of Emperor Napoléon, is created King Giuseppe Napoleone of Naples and Sicily.
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April 1, 1806: The United Kingdom declares war on Prussia after Prussia annexes Hannover, which is ruled by the British monarch.
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April 1, 1806: Luigi Cherubini (45) arrives back in Paris after an absence of nine months.
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April 4, 1806: The Imperial Catechism is published to teach young Roman Catholics the virtues of following Emperor Napoléon.
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April 8, 1806: In an attempt to gain an alliance with the Prince of Baden, Emperor Napoléon marries his adopted daughter, Stéphanie de Beauharnais, to Prince Karl Ludwig Friedrich of Baden, in Paris.
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April 8, 1806: The Principality of Anhalt-Bernburg becomes the Duchy of Anhalt-Bernburg. Prince Alexius becomes Duke Alexius.
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April 8, 1806: Tamerlane et Bajazet, a ballet with contributions by Henry R. Bishop (19) to a story by Rossi, is performed for the first time, in King’s Theatre in the Haymarket, London.
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April 9, 1806: Reuss-Schleiz und Gera is created a principality.
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April 9, 1806: Publication of the Piano Sonata op.54 by Ludwig van Beethoven (35) is announced.
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April 15, 1806: Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s (27) cantata Diana ed Endimione to words of Brizzi is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 18, 1806: The United States Congress votes to end importation of certain British goods in retaliation for British seizure of American ships.
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April 20, 1806: Georg Joseph Vogler’s (56) Bavarian National Symphony, a reworking of his Symphony in C, is performed for the Bavarian court in Munich.
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April 22, 1806: The French commander of Trafalgar, Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve, is found dead at an inn in Rennes with seven stab wounds in the chest. The official explanation is suicide. Given the wounds, the verdict is widely ridiculed and agents of Emperor Napoléon are assumed to have carried out the deed.
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April 28, 1806: Un tour de soubrette, an opéra comique by Adrien Boieldieu (30) to words of Gersin is performed for the first time, in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg.
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April 29, 1806: The impeachment trial of First Lord of the Admiralty Henry Dundas, Viscount Melville, begins in the House of Lords. He is charged with misappropriation of funds.
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May 1, 1806: Istria is annexed by the Kingdom of Italy.
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May 1, 1806: Any slave freed after this date in Virginia must leave the state.
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May 5, 1806: Elector Karl Friedrich of Baden-Durlach becomes Duke of Baden-Durlach.
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May 6, 1806: Johann Simon Mayr (42) opens his new music school, Lezioni Caritatevoli, in Bergamo, founded to provide musicians for the local church. Among the students is Gaetano Donizetti (8).
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May 11, 1806: Great Britain declares war on Prussia.
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May 11, 1806: Joseph Bonaparte makes his first entry into Naples as King Giuseppe Napoleone.  At the same time, British warships enter the harbor and take Capri.
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May 15, 1806: Armide et Renaud, a ballet with an overture by Henry R. Bishop (19) to a story by Rossi, is performed for the first time, in the King’s Theatre in the Haymarket, London.
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May 16, 1806: A limited blockade on France against neutral shipping is imposed by Great Britain. Named after the Foreign Minister, it is called the Fox Blockade.
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May 17, 1806: The impeachment trial of First Lord of the Admiralty Henry Dundas, Viscount Melville, concludes in the House of Lords. He is acquitted, but will never again hold public office.
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May 17, 1806: Étienne Nicolas Méhul’s (42) opéra comique Malvina to words of Saint-Victor after MacPherson (Ossian), is performed for the first time, in Théâtre Feydeau, Paris. It will later be called Uthal.
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May 18, 1806: A new, large Moravian church is dedicated in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 6,000 people are on hand for the ceremony, including Johann Friedrich Peter who, presumably, contributes his abilities on the organ, on the eve of his 60th birthday.  Gott hat unter uns aufgerichtet das Wort von der Versöhnung by Johannes Herbst (70) is performed.
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May 24, 1806: The Principality of Guastalla is attached to the Kingdom of Italy.
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May 25, 1806: Carl van Beethoven marries Johanna Reiss. Carl now stops acting as business manager for his brother Ludwig (35).
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May 26, 1806: Emperor Napoléon decrees the dissolution of the Republic of Dubrovnik.
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May 27, 1806: Ansbach, currently under French occupation, is annexed to Bavaria.
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May 30, 1806: Emperor Napoléon calls for an assembly of Jewish leaders and Rabbis from every department in France to discuss the status of Jews in the Empire and answer charges by anti-semites.
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June 1, 1806: Bavaria officially becomes a kingdom by the terms of the Treaty of Pressburg.
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June 5, 1806: Napoléon transforms the Batavian Commonwealth into the Kingdom of Holland. His brother Louis is crowned king.
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June 5, 1806: The Principality of Benevento is created, subject to France.
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June 21, 1806: Carl Maria von Weber (19) closes his career in Breslau (Wroclaw) with a farewell concert.
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June 24, 1806: The Bologna Accademia Filarmonica admits Gioachino Rossini (14) without charge, due to his excellent singing.
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June 24, 1806: Narcisse et les graces, an anacreontic ballet by Henry R. Bishop (19) to a story by Rossi, is performed for the first time, in the King’s Theatre in the Haymarket, London.
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June 25, 1806: Gabrielle d’Estrées, ou Les amours d’Henri IV, an opéra by Étienne Nicolas Méhul (43) to words of Saint-Just, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Feydeau, Paris. It is popular, perhaps because of the similarity of Henri IV to Napoléon, but will be suspended after six performances. The reason is unknown, although Saint-Just suspects government interference.
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June 27, 1806: Fearing that Napoléon will soon usurp the Spanish throne, English troops land at Buenos Aires and occupy the town. The Spanish governor flees to Córdoba. Local forces will evict the British in August.
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June 28, 1806: By command of the royal government of Naples, presently in Palermo, Admiral Sir Sydney Smith, commanding British troops in Calabria, is given command over all Neapolitan forces.
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June 29, 1806: Das Fest des Dankes und Freude, a cantata by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (27), is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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July 1, 1806: Overtura Chinesa by Carl Maria von Weber (19) is performed for the first time, in Breslau (Wroclaw).
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July 1, 1806: British troops disembark at Santa Eufemia in Calabria in an attempt to forestall a French invasion of Sicily.
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July 4, 1806: British forces defeat the French at Maida in Calabria, then return to Sicily.  The French are forced to postpone their invasion of Sicily.
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July 10, 1806: Sepoys revolt at Vellore (presently in Tamil Nadu) against changes in the dress code ordered by the local British commander. The changes are offensive to both Hindus and Moslems for different reasons. They take over the fort, killing about 100 of their comrades. A relief force arrives from Arcot later in the day and retakes the fort. 19 Sepoys will be executed.
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July 12, 1806: By a treaty signed today in Paris between France and 16 German princes, the Confederation of the Rhine consisting of Bavaria, Württemberg, Baden, Hesse-Darmstadt and other smaller states is created. Carl Theodor, Baron von Dalberg, Archbishop of Mainz becomes Prince-Primate of the confederation.  The Duchy of Cleves and Berg is made into the Grand Duchy of Berg. Duke Joachim Murat is created Grand Duke.  The County of Hohengeroldseck becomes the Principality of Hohengeroldseck. Philipp Franz Wilhelm Ignaz Peter, Count of Leyen and Hohengeroldseck takes on the title Prince of Leyen and Hohengeroldseck.  Liechtenstein becomes a sovereign principality under Prince Johann I.
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July 15, 1806: Lieutenant Zebulon Pike, leading an expedition of 23 (plus 51 Indians), departs Fort Bellefontaine at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. His orders are to seek alliances with the Osage and Pawnee and to locate the sources of the Arkansas and Red Rivers.
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July 18, 1806: Giovanni Paisiello (66) is created a member of the French Legion of Honor by Emperor Napoléon.
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July 18, 1806: Careless British soldiers explode a magazine at Vittoriosa (Birgu), Malta. 200-250 people are killed.
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July 18, 1806: After holding out for five months, Neapolitans in Gaeta surrender to the French.
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July 20, 1806: Representatives of France and Russia sign a draft peace treaty in Paris. It will never be ratified by Russia.
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July 23, 1806: 111 Jewish leaders from every department in France and northern Italy meet at the Hôtel de Ville in Paris at the request of Emperor Napoléon.
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July 23, 1806: Louise Reichardt’s (27) first publication of 12 songs is favorably reviewed in the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung.
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August 1, 1806: Emperor Napoléon declares that the Holy Roman Empire no longer exists.
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August 1, 1806: Bentheim and Steinfurt are annexed to Berg. The County of Salm-Horstmar is also annexed to Berg.
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August 2, 1806: King Giuseppe Napoleone of Naples and Sicily decrees and end to feudalism in the country.
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August 6, 1806: Emperor Franz II renounces the imperial crown and becomes Emperor Franz I of Austria. This single act ends the thousand-year history of that most indescribable of political entities, the Holy Roman Empire.
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August 7, 1806: The British diplomat Lord Yarmouth reveals to the Prussian ambassador that Napoléon offered Hannover to Britain. The Prussian court is outraged.
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August 8, 1806: During a concert given by students of the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna, Gioachino Rossini (14) makes his last appearance as a soprano.
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August 9, 1806: General Blücher begins a false rumor that Napoléon is mobilizing against Prussia.
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August 10, 1806: Johann Michael Haydn dies at Festungsgasse Nr.4 in Salzburg, Austrian Empire, of consumption, aged 68 years, ten months, and 27 days. His earthly remains will be laid to rest in St. Peter’s Churchyard, Salzburg.
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August 12, 1806: The British garrison at Buenos Aires surrenders to local troops from Argentina and Uruguay after holding the city for 46 days.
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August 13, 1806: Hesse-Darmstadt is created the Grand Duchy of Hesse. Duke Ludwig X of Hesse-Darmstadt becomes Grand Duke Ludwig I.  Duke Karl Friedrich of Baden-Durlach becomes Grand Duke of Baden-Durlach.
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August 14, 1806: British forces capture Fort Licosa, south of Naples.
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August 18, 1806: Ottoman Sultan Selim III deposes the rulers of Moldavia and Wallachia replacing them with pro-French monarchs.
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August 18, 1806: Kantate zur Geburtstagfeier von Liebmann Meyer Wulff by Meyer Beer (Giacomo Meyerbeer) (14) is performed for the first time.
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August 20, 1806: Prince Karl of Anhalt-Bernburg-Schaumburg-Hoym dies in Schaumburg and is succeeded by his son Viktor II.
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August 22, 1806: Jean-Honoré Fragonard dies in Paris at the age of 74.
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August 25, 1806: Under orders of Emperor Napoléon, Johann Philipp Palm is summarily executed in Braunau, Austria. Palm published a strongly anti-French pamphlet in Nuremberg. The news will send Berlin into an uproar.
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August 30, 1806: The Principalities of Nassau-Weilburg and Nassau-Usingen are joined together to form the Duchy of Nassau. It is ruled jointly by Friedrich August, Duke of Nassau (-Usingen) and Friedrich Wilhelm, Prince of Nassau (-Weilburg).
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September 2, 1806: 40,000,000 cubic meters of rock lets loose from the Rossberg, destroying the towns of Goldau, Busingen, Röthen, and Lauerz, Switzerland. Some of the rock hits the Lauerzersee, causing a tsunami on the lake and more destruction. At least 457 people are killed.
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September 3, 1806: Emperor Napoléon receives Tsar Alyeksandr’s rejection of the 20 July treaty.
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September 5, 1806: Emperor Napoléon calls to service 50,000 conscripts and 30,000 reservists, fearing an international conspiracy against France. His first target is Prussia.
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September 9, 1806: A hurricane strikes Dominica, killing 457 people.
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September 13, 1806: Charles James Fox, British Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, dies at Chiswick House near London at the age of 57. He was one of the most prominent Whig leaders and opponents of William Pitt (who died last January).
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September 15, 1806: The free city of Nürnberg is attached to Bavaria.
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September 19, 1806: The free city of Frankfurt-am-Main is attached to the possessions of the Prince of Regensburg.
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September 20, 1806: A second hurricane this year hits Dominica, killing 165 people.
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September 20, 1806: The Lewis and Clark expedition reaches La Charette, the furthest white settlement on the Missouri River.
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September 23, 1806: The Lewis and Clark expedition reaches St. Louis two years and four months after leaving it.
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September 26, 1806: An ultimatum is sent from King Friedrich Wilhelm of Prussia to Napoléon demanding the removal of all French troops over the Rhine and French acquiescence in a North German Confederation, as well as other issues. The Emperor is already on the march in Germany.
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September 26, 1806: Würzburg becomes a Grand Duchy under Grand Duke Ferdinand Joseph Johann Baptist of Austria.
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October 1, 1806: Georg Joseph Vogler (57) buys into a printing company in Munich.
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October 1, 1806: Jan Ladislav Dussek (46) writes to his publishers, Breitkopf and Härtel, that he is leaving for war, accompanying his employer and friend, Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Prussia.
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October 2, 1806: Prussia’s ultimatum of 26 September reaches Paris, but Emperor Napoléon is not there. He has already taken command of his troops at Würzburg.
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October 7, 1806: Ralph Wedgewood receives a British patent for carbon paper.
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October 7, 1806: The Prussian ultimatum of 26 September finally reaches Napoléon at Würzburg.
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October 8, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Napoléon answers Prussia’s ultimatum by invading Prussian territory through the Thuringerwald (Franconian Forest). Bayreuth passes to French administration.
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October 8, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Congreve rockets are used in anger for the first time, as the Royal Navy destroys a good part of the city of Boulogne, France.
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October 9, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Prussia declares war on France as the first skirmishes occur at Schleiz with the French army marching towards Berlin.
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October 9, 1806: At the home of Prince Ludwig Friedrich II of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, Jan Ladislav Dussek (46) performs his Concerto for two pianos and orchestra op.63 C.206 for the first time, possibly with string quartet.
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October 10, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French forces defeat the Prussians at Saalfeld, 40 km southeast of Erfurt. Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Prussia is killed in action. He was accompanied into battle by his friend and employee, Jan Ladislav Dussek (46). After the death of Prince Ludwig, Prussian and Saxon troops flee before the French. Dussek will later pen the Elégie harmonique sur la mort du Prince Louis Ferdinand de Prusse, honoring the memory of his good friend.
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October 13, 1806: Hilmi Ibrahim Pasha replaces Hafiz Ismail Pasha as Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire.
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October 14, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Invading French forces meet the Prussians and Saxons at Jena and Auerstädt, near Weimar, with calamitous consequences for the Germans. 32,000 people are killed. As the battles rage nearby, a professor at the University of Jena, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, is finishing his book Phenomenology of Spirit.
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October 16, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: The Prussian command organizes its forces and retreats towards Magdeburg while the pursuing French capture Erfurt.
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October 16, 1806: In response to the Turkish action of 18 August in Moldavia and Wallachia, Russian forces invade Ottoman territory across the River Dniester.
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October 17, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Napoléon’s troops catch up with the retreating Prussians at Halle and engage them. The Prussians flee the field. 5,800 people are killed.
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October 17, 1806: “Emperor Jacques I” of Haiti, the former General Jean-Jacques Dessalines, is murdered by his own troops at Pont Rouge.
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October 20, 1806: HMS Athenienne strikes a reef in the Strait of Sicily and rolls over. 347 people are lost while 141 survive in one lifeboat.
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October 24, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French troops reach the suburbs of Berlin.
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October 25, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French forces enter Berlin. The Prussian court flees to Königsberg.
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October 26, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French forces occupy Osnabrück.
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October 27, 1806: A French administration takes over in Fulda.
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October 27, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Emperor Napoléon enters Berlin. He immediately visits the tomb of Friedrich the Great to pay him homage.
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October 28, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: A Prussian army, believing itself to be surrounded by a French force ten times its size (it is not), surrenders at Prenzlau, 95 km northeast of Berlin.
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October 29, 1806: British troops capture the Spanish garrison of Maldonado (Uruguay) and go on to take Punta del Este.
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October 29, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Prussian cavalry surrenders to a French force less than one-fifth its size, at Pasewalk, 24 km northeast of Prenzlau. Meanwhile, 38 km to the east, the French capture Stettin (Szczecin) without firing a shot.
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October 29, 1806: Publication of the Rondo for piano op.19 and the Hungarian Dance for piano op.23 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (27) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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November 3, 1806: Essen is transferred from Prussia to Berg.
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November 3, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: With Napoléon’s blessing, Polish leaders in Berlin issue a call for a national Polish uprising.
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November 4, 1806: The County of Hanau is placed under French administration.
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November 6, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French troops rout a Prussian and Swedish force at Lübeck. The French go on to sack the town.
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November 7, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: The last Prussian force of consequence surrenders to the French at Lübeck. Napoléon has completed his conquest of Prussia in seven weeks. He dispatches large forces to the east into Poland.
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November 10, 1806: Duke Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand of Braunschweig dies of wounds suffered at the Battle of Auerstädt, in Ottensen, Hamburg and is succeeded by his son Friedrich Wilhelm.
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November 10, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Magdeburg surrenders to the French.
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November 12, 1806: Muzio Clementi (54) arrives in Vienna from St. Petersburg where he will meet Beethoven (35) and buy the rights to some of his works.
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November 12, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French troops occupy Hildesheim.
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November 15, 1806: Zebulon Pike first views the mountain that bears his name.
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November 18, 1806: Mo’in ad-Din Abu’n Nasr Mohammad Akbar Padshah Saheb Quiran-e Sani replaces Jalal ad-Din Abu’l Mozaffar Mohammad Shah Alam II Padshah as Emperor of India.
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November 19, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French forces occupy Hamburg.
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November 21, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Napoléon issues the Berlin Decrees. All continental ports are closed to British ships and all British ports are to be blockaded.
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November 26, 1806: Prince Nicholas II Esterházy writes to Joseph Haydn to tell him that the increase in his stipend which Haydn requested is granted. Haydn asked for the increase to offset medical expenses.
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November 28, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Invading French forces capture Warsaw, which was abandoned by the Russians.
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November 28, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Russia declares war on France.
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November 30, 1806: Dmitry Stepanovich Bortnyansky (55) is promoted by Tsar Alyeksandr to the rank of Active State Counsellor (equal to a major general).
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December 2, 1806: The US Congress votes to end the importation of slaves after 1807.
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December 3, 1806: Publication of the Variations for piano op.21 of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (28) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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December 9, 1806: Ohio militiamen seize boats and supplies stockpiled by Aaron Burr and his accomplice Harman Blennerhassett, at Marietta on the Ohio River. Burr intended to use these for his plan to separate the southwest from the United States.
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December 9, 1806: Duke Franz Friedrich Anton of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld dies in Coburg and is succeeded by his son Ernst I.
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December 11, 1806: Militiamen raid the island owned by Harman Blennerhassett, in the Ohio River near Marietta where Aaron Burr’s “army” has been congregating. Most of them have already run away.
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December 11, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: A treaty of peace is signed between France and Saxony at Posen (Poznan). Saxony is made a kingdom and joins the Rhenish Confederation. Elector Friedrich August III becomes King Friedrich August I.
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December 17, 1806: Seven weeks of voting in the British general elections concludes with the supporters of Prime Minister Lord Grenville somewhat strengthened in the new Parliament.
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December 18, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Emperor Napoléon reaches Warsaw, in French hands since 28 November.
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December 22, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: The French force their way across the River Narew against Russian defenders at Tscharnovo (Debe), 30 km north of Warsaw, causing 2,800 total casualties.
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December 23, 1806: Ludwig van Beethoven’s (36) Concerto for violin and orchestra op.61 is performed for the first time, in the Theater an der Wien, Vienna. Since the music is not ready until the last minute, the soloist, Franz Clement, reads the solo part with only minimal preparation.
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December 24, 1806: Russian troops enter Bucharest.
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December 24, 1806: Duke Ferdinando of Modena, Reggio, and Ferrara dies in Vienna and is succeeded by his son, Francesco IV.
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December 26, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: Two engagements between French and Russian troops take place near Warsaw. At Pultusk, 52 km north of the city, there is no strategic result. At Golymin, 23 km northwest of Pultusk, the French gain slight advantage.
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December 27, 1806: The Ottoman Empire declares war on Russia.
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December 27, 1806: Samuel Wesley’s (40) third setting of Dixit Dominus, for three voices, is performed for the first time, at a meeting of the Concentores Society, London.
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December 28, 1806: Adrien Boieldieu’s (31) opéra comique Télémaque, to words of Dercy, is performed for the first time, in the Hermitage, St. Petersburg.
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December 29, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: A continued Russian retreat, refusing to stand and fight, and bad weather force Napoléon to make winter quarters in Poland.