A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

January 1, 1802 – December 31, 1802

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January 1, 1802: Ceylon becomes a Crown Colony of Britain.
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January 1, 1802: Incidental music to Kotzebue’s play Die Kreuzfahrer by Johann Friedrich Reichardt (49) is performed for the first time, in the Nationaltheater, Berlin.
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January 1, 1802: William Cobbett publishes the first issue of his weekly The Political Register in Britain.  At this time his is anti-reform. That will eventually change.
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January 2, 1802: Das Zauberschloss, a singspiel by Johann Friedrich Reichardt (49) to words of Kotzebue is performed for the first time, at the Nationaltheater, Berlin.
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January 9, 1802: The Harmonic Society of Philadelphia is founded for the study and performance of sacred music. Its first president will be Andrew Law (52).
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January 16, 1802: I misteri eleusini, a dramma per musica by Simon Mayr (38) to words of Bernardoni, is performed for the first time, at Teatro alla Scala, Milan.
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January 20, 1802: Joseph Bonaparte grants an annual pension of 3,000 francs to Luigi Boccherini (58).
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January 26, 1802: Napoléon Bonaparte meets in Lyon with a commission from the Cisalpine Republic who request that he assume the presidency of their country.
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January 27, 1802: Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg dies of a heart attack in Stuttgart, Duchy of Württemberg, aged 42 years and 17 days.  His mortal remains will be laid to rest in Hoppenlau cemetery, Stuttgart.
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January 29, 1802: John James Beckley is named the first Librarian of Congress. He receives $2 per day.
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January 29, 1802: 20,000 troops sent by First Consul Napoléon Bonaparte arrive at Samaná Bay to reassert French control over Saint Domingue (Haiti).
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February 9, 1802: Toussaint L’Ouverture decides to fight the French forces which landed on Hispaniola on 29 January.
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February 15, 1802: Volume Two of Clementi’s Practical Harmony by Muzio Clementi (50) is published in London.
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February 27, 1802: Three Piano Sonatas with violin and cello accompaniment op.49 by Leopold Kozeluch (54) are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 1, 1802: Prince Friedrich Karl of Wied-Neuwied dies and is succeeded by Johann August Karl.
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March 3, 1802: Publication of the piano sonatas opp.26&27 by Ludwig van Beethoven (31) is announced.
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March 16, 1802: The US Congress authorizes the creation of a military academy at West Point, New York.
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March 19, 1802: François-Adrien Boieldieu (26) marries Clotilde Mafleuray, a dancer, in Paris.
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March 22, 1802: The Society for the Suppression of Vice is founded at Gray’s-Inn coffee house, London. They seek to put an end to profanity, prostitution, gambling, pornography, and cruelty to animals.
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March 25, 1802: Peace between Great Britain, France, the Netherlands, and Spain is signed in Amiens. Britain returns to France, the Netherlands, and Spain all maritime conquests except Trinidad and Ceylon. France agrees to evacuate Naples. The independence of Portugal is recognized. Both France and Britain pledge to evacuate Egypt and restore it to Turkey. Malta is restored to the Knights of St. John.
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March 26, 1802: Richard Trevithick and Andrew Vivian receive a British patent for a portable high pressure steam engine.
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March 28, 1802: In Bremen, Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers discovers Pallas, the second asteroid to be viewed from Earth.
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March 30, 1802: Sweden adheres to the Treaty of St. Petersburg between Prussia, Russia, Great Britain, and Denmark.
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April 4, 1802: Prince Leopold I of Lippe dies in Detmold and is succeeded by his five-year-old son Leopold II under regency.
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April 5, 1802: Die Schöpfung by Franz Joseph Haydn (70) is performed in Engelhardt House, St. Petersburg to inaugurate the St. Petersburg Philharmonic Society.
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April 5, 1802: Une folie, a comédie mêlée de chants by Étienne-Nicolas Méhul (38) to words of Bouilly, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Feydeau, Paris. It is a great success and will be performed more than 200 times during the composer’s life.
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April 8, 1802: By Les Articles Organiques, Napoléon details the relationship between the state and the Roman Catholic Church. He also grants religious freedom to Protestants but without a national synod. And Jews are granted political equality.
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April 10, 1802: Johann Friedrich Reichardt’s (49) melodram Hercules Tod, after Sophocles, is performed for the first time, in the Nationaltheater, Berlin.
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April 18, 1802: In an extremely popular concordat with the Pope, Napoléon reestablishes Roman Catholicism as the state religion of France.
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April 25, 1802: Giovanni Paisiello (61) arrives in Paris, having been summoned by Napoléon.
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April 26, 1802: Reuss-Schleiz and Reuss-Gera are unified. The new entity is called Reuss-Schleiz und Gera.
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April 26, 1802: Napoléon signs an act granting amnesty to most of the émigrés from the French Revolution.
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April 30, 1802: In Hamburg, Louis Spohr (18) begins taking violin lessons with Franz Eck, one of the last representatives of the Mannheim School.
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May 1, 1802: The Lycée (secondary) schools are founded in France by Napoléon.
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May 5, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) makes the acquaintance of Ludwig Spohr (18) in Hamburg, at a dinner at the home of Herr Kiekhöver.
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May 5, 1802: After a few defeats in battle, Toussaint L’Ouverture suspends operations against the French on Hispaniola and returns to his home at Ennery. He waits for the climate and disease to fight for him.
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May 5, 1802: Giovanni Paisiello (61) is introduced to First Consul Napoléon in Paris. In the evening he attends a performance of his own Zingari in fiera. He is recognized and applauded vociferously. The composer thereupon is invited to spend the third act in Napoléon’s box and the two apparently begin a very amicable relationship.
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May 6, 1802: Symphony in B flat by Samuel Wesley (36) is performed for the first time, in London.
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May 10, 1802: A referendum takes place in France on the new constitution creating Napoléon Bonaparte First Consul for life. Half the electorate votes. Official results show 99% in favor.
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May 10, 1802: Colonel Louis Delgrès, a mulatto with military experience, begins armed resistance on Guadeloupe against the reimposition of slavery by First Counsel Napoléon Bonaparte. They will eventually fail and kill themselves with their own gunpowder.
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May 12, 1802: A US patent is granted to Andrew Law (53) for a new system of musical notation which involves four note shapes and the elimination of the staff.
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May 15, 1802: Christian Heinrich Kurt Count von Haugwiz replaces Friedrich Anton Baron von Heinitz as Minister of State of Prussia.
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May 19, 1802: Napoléon institutes the Legion of Honor. Originally intended for the military, later it will be extended to civilians.
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May 31, 1802: Napoléon informs the Neapolitan government that he will occupy the Puglie because Britain has not evacuated Malta.
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June 2, 1802: By the wishes of the retiring kapellmeister, Carlo Lenzi, Simon Mayr (38) becomes kapellmeister of Santa Maria Maggiore, Bergamo.
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June 3, 1802: King Carlo Emmanuele IV of Sardinia abdicates and is succeeded by his brother Vittorio Emanuele I. At present he rules over only the island of Sardinia.
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June 3, 1802: The Bishopric of Fulda is annexed to Nassau-Orange.
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June 4, 1802: Elba is annexed by France.
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June 7, 1802: French forces capture Toussaint L’Ouverture on Hispaniola and put him and his family on a ship for France, where he will be imprisoned.
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June 10, 1802: 34 years in the building, St. Isaac’s Cathedral is consecrated in St. Petersburg in the presence of Tsar Alyeksandr.
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June 10, 1802: An armed slave uprising begins in nine counties of North Carolina.
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June 15, 1802: The North Carolina slave revolt begun five days ago is crushed by authorities.
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June 22, 1802: Royal Assent is granted to “An Act for the Preservation of the Health and Morals of Apprentices and others, employed in Cotton and other Mills, and Cotton and other Factories.” It is the first time the British government regulates the conditions of factory workers, including limiting apprentices to work no more than twelve hours a day.
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June 25, 1802: A treaty of peace is signed between France and Turkey in Paris.
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June 26, 1802: The Republic of Italy is created from Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna. The President is Napoléon Bonaparte.
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June 26, 1802: A new constitution is given to the Ligurian Republic (Genoa) making it subordinate to France.
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July 3, 1802: Girolamo Luigi Francesco Durazzo becomes Doge of the Ligurian Republic (Genoa), replacing the Commission of Governement.
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July 4, 1802: Carl Theodor, Baron von Dalberg replaces Friedrich Karl Joseph Baron von Erthal as Archbishop of Mainz.
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July 20, 1802: Services begin in the new chapel created by First Consul Napoléon Bonaparte in the Tuileries Palace. The musical director is Giovanni Paisiello (62).
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July 25, 1802: Carl Theodor, Baron von Dalberg, Elector-Archbishop of Mainz becomes Prince-Bishop of Worms.
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July 27, 1802: At Karlsruhe, Professor Carl Wilhelm Boeckmann compares the difference between dry bulb and wet bulb thermometers, thus determining humidity.
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July 28, 1802: Giuseppe Sarti dies in Berlin, Kingdom of Prussia, 72 years, seven months, and 27 days after his baptism.  He stopped on his return trip from St. Petersburg to Italy to visit his daughter.  His mortal remains will be laid to rest in the Hedwigskirche there.
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July 29, 1802: Étienne-Nicolas Méhul’s (39) opéra comique Le trésor supposé, ou Le danger d’écouter aux portes to words of Hoffman is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Feydeau, Paris. It is a moderate success.
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July 30, 1802: The Principality of Hildesheim is annexed by Prussia.
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August 2, 1802: French voters approve a new constitution which names Napoléon Bonaparte First Consul for Life.
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August 3, 1802: The Bishopric of Paderborn is annexed by Prussia.
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August 4, 1802: The Constitution of the Year X goes into effect. Napoléon Bonaparte is named First Consul for Life, with the right to appoint his own successor.
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August 14, 1802: Publication of the piano sonata op.28 by Ludwig van Beethoven (31) is announced.
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August 15, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) returns to his home town of Cáslav, Bohemia for the first time, to visit his parents.
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August 15, 1802: Six composers, Luigi Cherubini (41), Étienne-Nicolas Méhul (39), Adrien Boieldieu (26), Rodolphe Kreutzer, Pierre Rode and Nicolò Isouard, create their own publishing business in Paris. They are inspired to do so by large commissions expected by established publishing houses.
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August 19, 1802: The name of the Théâtre de la République et des Arts (Paris Opéra) is changed to the Théâtre de l’Opéra.
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August 20, 1802: Britain ends its occupation of St. Pierre and Miquelon.
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August 28, 1802: After almost two months of voting, the British general election concludes. Prime Minister Addington’s Tories and their supporters are victorious. The first Radical members are returned.
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September 8, 1802: Die Harmoniemesse by Franz Joseph Haydn (70) is performed for the first time, at Eisenstadt for the name day of Princess Maria Hermenegild.
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September 11, 1802: France annexes Piedmont.
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September 11, 1802: The publication of Muzio Clementi’s (50) three piano sonatas op.40 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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September 14, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) gives a concert with horn player Giovanni Punto in Cáslav. It will be repeated tomorrow.
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September 18, 1802: Faced with an armed uprising by rural Swiss, and the absence of French troops, the central government of the Helvetic Republic collapses.
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September 20, 1802: Count Alyeksandr Romanovich Vorontsov replaces Prince Alyeksandr Borisovich Kurakin as State Chancellor of Russia.
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September 25, 1802: Napoléon orders Giovanni Paisiello (62) to direct the music of the mass in the First Consul’s chapel every Sunday.
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October 6, 1802: Ludwig van Beethoven (31) writes to his brother from Heiligenstadt, a town in the country where he has gone on the advice of his doctor. The composer speaks of his growing deafness and the emotion he feels inside at its onset, even to the point of suicide. (The letter was apparently never sent, and will be found among his effects after his death.)
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October 6, 1802: The opening of a new singing school led by Andrew Law (53) is advertised in the Boston Columbian Centinel.
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October 9, 1802: Duke Ferdinando of Parma, Piacenza, and Guastalla dies in Fontevivo.  A three-person regency is set up to rule the duchies.
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October 11, 1802: The first patent for a parachute is awarded to Jacques Garnerin of France.
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October 15, 1802: Spain formally transfers the Louisiana Territory to France.
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October 16, 1802: Spain announces the closure of the port of New Orleans to US ships.
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October 23, 1802: The army of Jeshwant Rao Holkar of Indore defeats the forces of Baji Rao II, the last of the Peshwas, at Hadapshar. The Peshwa will seek support from the British.
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November 1, 1802: The Duchies of Parma and Piacenza come under French rule. Jean Victor Moreau de Saint Méry is named commissioner.
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November 2, 1802: General Charles Victor Emmanuel Leclerc, brother-in-law of First Consul Napoléon Bonaparte and commander of French forces on Hispaniola, dies of yellow fever at Le Cap (Cap-Haïtien).
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November 10, 1802: The Bishopric of Osnabrück is annexed to Hannover.
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November 16, 1802: Colonel Edward Despard and 32 others are arrested in Lambeth on a charge of high treason, fomenting a plot to take over the Tower of London and kill King George.
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November 18, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) makes his first performance in Leipzig.
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November 18, 1802: Der Fassbinder, a singspiel by Johann Baptist Schenk (48) to words after Audinot, is performed for the first time, in the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna.
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November 22, 1802: France annexes most of Speyer.
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November 23, 1802: Joanna, an opéra by Étienne-Nicolas Méhul (39) to words of Marsollier des Vivetières, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre Feydeau, Paris. It is not well received and will be performed only eight times.
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November 29, 1802: The Bishoprics of Eichstätt and Würzburg are annexed by Bavaria.
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December 1, 1802: The Principality of Regensburg is created. The Prince Archbishop of Mainz will become the Prince Archbishop of Regensburg.
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December 2, 1802: The British Health and Morals of Apprentices Act goes into effect. It outlaws work at night, work more than twelve hours a day, and the hiring of orphans under nine years old.
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December 4, 1802: Great Britain restores Surinam to the Netherlands.
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December 30, 1802: Carl Theodor, Baron von Dalberg, Elector-Archbishop of Mainz and Prince-Bishop of Worms becomes Prince-Archbishop and Elector of Regensburg.
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December 31, 1802: By the Treaty of Bassein (Vasai, Maharashtra), the Peshwa of Poona cedes his independence and that of the Maratha Confederacy to the British East India Company.