A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

William Walton

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March 29, 1902: William Turner Walton is born at 93 Werneth Hall Road in Oldham, Lancashire, United Kingdom, the second of four children born to Charles Alexander Walton, choirmaster, grammar school music teacher, and voice teacher, and Louisa Maria Turner, singer and daughter of an upholsterer.
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March 15, 1916: William Walton (13) is confirmed in Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford where he is attending the choir school.
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September 17, 1916: Choral Fantasia for organ by William Walton (14) is performed for the first time, in the Cathedral Church of Christ the King, Oxford.
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November 3, 1916: William Walton (14) wins the Composition Prize and the History Prize at the choir school at Oxford.
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November 9, 1917: William Walton (15) wins the Dean’s Prize at the choir school, Oxford.
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June 11, 1918: William Walton (16) passes the first half of his Bachelor of Music examination at New College, Oxford. Dr. Thomas Strong, Dean of Christ Church Cathedral, writes to Walton’s father, urging him to allow the boy to matriculate at Oxford.
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November 13, 1918: The governing body of Christ Church, Oxford, grants William Walton (16) an in-College Exhibition of £85 per year for two years.
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June 9, 1920: William Walton (18) passes the second half of his Bachelor of Music degree. Among his examiners is Ralph Vaughan Williams (47).
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November 10, 1920: William Walton (18) receives £150 from Christchurch Cathedral to cover his debts.
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March 4, 1921: Two movements of the original version of a string quartet by William Walton (18) are performed for the first time, at the Contemporary Music Centre, London. See 5 July 1923.
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January 24, 1922: Façade, for reciter and six players by William Walton (19) to words of Sitwell, is performed for the first time, privately, at the Sitwells’ house in Chelsea, the composer conducting. See 12 June 1923.
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June 12, 1923: William Walton’s (21) Façade, for reciter and six players to words of Sitwell, is performed publicly for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London, the composer conducting. The work elicits hisses and threats from the audience. One review will be headlined “Drivel They Paid to Hear.”  The poet will recall, "Never...was a larger and more imposing shower of brickbats hurled at any new work."  (Riley, ed., 134)
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July 5, 1923: William Walton’s (21) String Quartet is performed for the first time with the added third movement, at the Royal College of Music, London. See 4 March 1921.
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August 4, 1923: William Walton (21) meets Arnold Schoenberg (48) and Alban Berg (38) at the ISCM Festival in Salzburg.
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September 19, 1924: A Piano Quartet by William Walton (22) is performed for the first time, in Liverpool.
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May 12, 1925: Toccata for violin and piano by William Walton (23) is performed for the first time, at 6 Queen Square, Bloomsbury, London.
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July 12, 1925: Incidental music to Strachey’s play The Son of Heaven by William Walton (23) is performed for the first time, in the Scala Theatre, London, conducted by the composer.
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June 22, 1926: William Walton’s (24) overture Portsmouth Point is performed for the first time, in the Zürich Tonhalle.
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November 24, 1926: Siesta for small orchestra by William Walton (24) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London, the composer conducting.
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December 3, 1926: Suite no.1 from Façade by William Walton (24) is performed for the first time, in the Lyceum, London the composer conducting.
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January 5, 1928: Sinfonia concertante for orchestra and piano obbligato by William Walton (25) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. The work is very successful.
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July 28, 1929: William Walton (27) meets with Paul Hindemith (33) in Baden-Baden to discuss his Viola Concerto. Hindemith agrees to perform the solo.
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October 3, 1929: The Viola Concerto of William Walton (27) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. Paul Hindemith (33) is the soloist with the composer at the podium. Also premiered is the Overture, Elegy and Rondo for orchestra by Arnold Bax (45).
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October 30, 1929: Two works for voice and piano by William Walton (27) are performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London: The Winds to words of Swinburne, and Tritons to words of Drummond. Also premiered is a Piano Quartet by Walton. ( The Winds was probably performed in the early 1920s. The Piano Quartet could have been performed already.)
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October 8, 1931: Belshazzar’s Feast, an oratorio for baritone, chorus, and orchestra by William Walton (29) to words of Sitwell after the Bible, is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Leeds. It is a stunning success with critics and the public.
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October 10, 1932: Three Songs for voice and orchestra by William Walton (30) to words of E. Sitwell, are performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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December 3, 1934: The first three movements of William Walton’s (32) Symphony no.1 are performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. See 6 November 1935.
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April 1, 1935: Escape Me Never, a film with music by William Walton (33), is shown for the first time, at the London Pavilion.
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November 6, 1935: Symphony no.1 by William Walton (33) is performed completely for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. See 3 December 1934.
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December 23, 1935: The First Shoot, a ballet by William Walton (33), is performed for the first time, as part of Cochran’s revue Follow the Sun, in the Manchester Opera House.
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September 3, 1936: As You Like It, a film with music by William Walton (34), is shown for the first time, in the Carlton Theatre, London. The press is mixed. It is the first Shakespeare film starring Laurence Olivier.
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November 12, 1936: An Organ Symphony by four British composers is performed for the first time, in St. John’s Church, Red Lion Square, London. The Theme for Improvisation is by Benjamin Britten (22) and the Adagio is by William Walton (34).
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November 21, 1936: Incidental music to Barrie’s play The Boy David by William Walton (34) is performed for the first time, in King’s Theatre, Edinburgh. It is an unparalleled flop.
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February 2, 1937: Dreaming Lips, a film with music by William Walton (35), is shown for the first time, in the London Pavilion.
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April 16, 1937: Crown Imperial, a march for orchestra by William Walton (35) is performed for the first time, in a recording session for His Master’s Voice. See 9 May 1937.
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May 9, 1937: William Walton’s (35) Crown Imperial, a march for the coronation of George VI, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC, London. The work is repeated at the actual coronation, 12 May.
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July 2, 1937: William Walton (35) receives an honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of Music, London.
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October 6, 1937: In Honour of the City of London for chorus and orchestra by William Walton (35) to words of Dunbar, is performed for the first time, ironically enough, in Leeds Town Hall.
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March 30, 1938: The Second Suite from Façade by William Walton (36) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York. See 24 January 1922, 12 June 1923 and 3 December 1926.
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November 22, 1938: Set Me as a Seal Upon Thine Heart, for chorus by William Walton (36) to words from the Bible, is performed for the first time, at St. Mary Abbots, London.
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January 18, 1939: A Stolen Life, a film with music by William Walton (36), is shown for the first time, in the Plaza Theatre, London.
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December 7, 1939: William Walton’s (37) Violin Concerto is performed for the first time, in Severance Hall, Cleveland by its dedicatee, Jascha Heifetz.
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April 24, 1940: The Wise Virgins, a ballet by William Walton (38) consisting of an arrangement of the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, is performed for the first time, in Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London.
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February 16, 1941: William Walton’s (38) orchestral work Music for Children is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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March 20, 1941: Major Barbara, a film with music by William Walton (38), is shown for the first time, in the Savoy Theatre, Nassau, Bahamas, in the presence of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor.
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April 3, 1941: Scapino overture by William Walton (39) is performed for the first time, in Orchestra Hall, Chicago. It was commissioned to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.
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January 7, 1942: Next of Kin, a film with music by William Walton (39), is shown for the first time, privately, in Curzon Theatre, London.
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January 16, 1942: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play Macbeth by William Walton (39) is performed for the first time, in the Manchester Opera House.
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February 12, 1942: William Walton (39) receives an honorary doctorate from Oxford University.
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April 13, 1942: The Foreman Went to France, a film with music by William Walton (40), is performed for the first time, in the London Pavilion.
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May 15, 1942: The Next of Kin, a film with music by William Walton (40), is shown publicly for the first time, at the London Pavilion.
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August 20, 1942: The First of the Few, a film with music by William Walton (40), is shown for the first time, in the Leicester Square Theatre, London.
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October 12, 1942: Incidental music to MacNeice’s radio play Christopher Columbus by William Walton (40) for alto, tenor, bass, two speakers, female speaking chorus, male speaking chorus, guitar, and orchestra, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC originating in Bedford. It celebrates the 450th anniversary of the landing of Columbus in the New World.
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November 1, 1942: Went the Day Well?, a film with music by William Walton (40), is shown for the first time, in the London Pavilion.
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January 2, 1943: William Walton’s (40) Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra is performed for the first time, in Liverpool Philharmonic Hall, under the baton of the composer.
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February 21, 1943: Fanfares for the Red Army for brass by William Walton (40) is performed for the first time, in the Royal Albert Hall, London. On the same program is the premiere of A Solemn Fanfare for brass by Arnold Bax (59).
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April 6, 1943: William Walton’s (41) ballet The Quest, to a scenario by Moore, is performed for the first time, in the New Theatre, London. See 3 June 1961.
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November 22, 1944: Henry V, a film with music by William Walton (42), is shown for the first time, at the Carlton, Haymarket, London.
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March 4, 1945: Memorial Fanfare for Henry Wood, a work for orchestra by William Walton (42), is performed for the first time, in the Royal Albert Hall, London.
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June 7, 1945: Peter Grimes, an opera by Benjamin Britten (31) to words of Slater after Crabbe, is performed for the first time, at the Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London. Present are Ralph Vaughan Williams (72), William Walton (43) and Michael Tippett (40). The audience and the press are enraptured, and the artists receive multiple curtain calls. It quickly becomes one of the most performed operas written in the 20th century.
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September 14, 1945: A suite from the score to the film Henry V by William Walton (43), arranged by Sargent, is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London.
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April 26, 1946: Where Does the Uttered Music Go? for chorus by William Walton (44) to words of Masefield is performed for the first time, at St. Sepulchre’s, Holborn, London. The occasion is the unveiling of a stained glass window in memory of Henry Wood.
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May 4, 1947: String Quartet in a minor by William Walton (45) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC, originating in London. See 5 May 1947.
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May 5, 1947: The first performance before a live audience of the String Quartet in a minor by William Walton (45) takes place in Broadcasting House, London. See 4 May 1947.
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November 19, 1947: William Walton (45) is presented with the Gold Medal of the Royal Philharmonic Society.
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May 6, 1948: Hamlet, a film with music by William Walton (46), is shown publicly for the first time, in the Odeon Theatre, Leicester Square, London.
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May 30, 1948: William Walton (46) is awarded an honorary doctorate from Trinity College, Dublin.
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June 25, 1948: The Times of London reports that Viscountess Wimborne, who died last 19 April, left £10,000, her residence Lowndes Cottage, a Bentley, and other effects to William Walton (46). Alice Wimborne once hoped to marry Walton.
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September 13, 1948: William Walton (46) sails from Genoa for Buenos Aires where he is to be a delegate to a conference of the Performing Rights Society. The group is meeting in Buenos Aires in hopes of inducing Argentina to sign the Bern Convention on copyright.
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December 13, 1948: William Walton (46) marries Susana Valeria Rosa Maria Gil Passo, daughter of an Argentinian lawyer, in a ceremony in civil court, Buenos Aires.
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January 20, 1949: William Walton (46) is married again in the Church of San Martín de Tours, Buenos Aires. The couple sails for Britain.
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July 6, 1949: William Walton (47) writes to Yale University turning down their offer to succeed Paul Hindemith (53) as Professor of Composition.
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September 30, 1949: Sonata for violin and piano by William Walton (47) is performed for the first time, in the Zürich Tonhalle.
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November 8, 1949: A ballet version of William Walton’s (47) Music for Children called Devoirs de vacances is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris. See 6 February 1941.
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September 27, 1950: Two Pieces for violin and piano by William Walton (48) is performed for the first time, in London.
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January 1, 1951: The announcement comes from Buckingham Palace that William Walton (48) is to be made Knight Bachelor. Later, Walton will write to his father-in-law: “I should never have accepted the knighthood, only I wanted to make Sue a lady.”
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January 17, 1952: William Walton (49) is named a member of the Swedish Academy of Music.
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March 18, 1953: Orb and Sceptre March by William Walton (50) is performed for the first time, in a recording session in Kingsway Hall, London conducted by the composer. See 2 June 1953.
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May 20, 1953: William Walton (51) receives an honorary DMus from Manchester University.
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June 2, 1953: Five new works by British composers are performed during the coronation ceremonies of Queen Elizabeth II in Westminster Abbey: Coronation Te Deum for chorus, orchestra, and organ, and Orb and Sceptre Coronation March for orchestra, both by William Walton (51); Coronation March for orchestra by Arnold Bax (69); The Old Hundredth Psalm Tune for chorus, unison chorus, orchestra, and organ and O Taste and See, a motet for chorus and organ to words of the Bible, both by Ralph Vaughan Williams (80). It is the first British coronation to be televised. See 18 March 1953.
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June 8, 1953: Gloriana op.53, an opera by Benjamin Britten (39) to words of Plomer after Strachey, is performed for the first time, at Covent Garden before Queen Elizabeth and other members of the royal family, knights, ministers, and foreign dignitaries. The Earl of Harewood calls it “one of the great disasters of operatic history.” Before the performance, William Walton’s (51) arrangement of God Save the Queen is performed for the first time. Walton is present, along with Ralph Vaughan Williams (80) and Arnold Bax (69).
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June 20, 1953: Variations on an Elizabethan Theme for strings is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC Third Programme, conducted by Benjamin Britten (39). Each of the six variations is composed by a different prominent British composer. Contributors include Britten, Michael Tippett (48) and William Walton (51).
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December 3, 1954: Troilus and Cressida, an opera by William Walton (52) to words of Hassall, is performed for the first time, at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Reviews are generally good but many are disappointed, calling it “old fashioned.” See 12 November 1976.
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December 13, 1955: Richard III, a film with music by William Walton (53), is shown for the first time, in Leicester Square Theatre, London.
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January 12, 1956: William Walton’s opera Troilus and Cressida opens in Teatro alla Scala, Milan. It is a fiasco and receives whistles, boos, and a hostile press.
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May 19, 1956: For tax purposes, William Walton (54) is declared a British citizen resident wholly abroad.
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September 25, 1956: William Walton’s (54) Johannesburg Festival Overture, commissioned to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the city, is performed for the first time, in Johannesburg City Hall.
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January 25, 1957: A Cello Concerto by William Walton (54) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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June 19, 1957: The Prime Minister of Malaya writes to Boosey and Hawkes with the proposal that either Benjamin Britten (43) or William Walton (55) compose a national anthem for the new nation.
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January 30, 1958: William Walton’s (55) Partita for Orchestra is performed for the first time, in Severence Hall, Cleveland. The work, which was commissioned by the Cleveland Orchestra to celebrate its 40th anniversary, is well received.
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June 7, 1958: Façade Suite for harmonica and orchestra by William Walton (56) is performed for the first time, in London.
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May 25, 1959: March: A History of the English Speaking Peoples, a theme composed for a BBC television series by William Walton (57), is performed for the first time, in a recording session at the Elstree ADPC studios conducted by the composer. It will never be used in the series.
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June 5, 1959: A Queen’s Fanfare for brass by William Walton (57) is performed for the first time, in Westminster Hall, London. The work was composed for the entrance of Queen Elizabeth at the NATO Parliamentary Conference.
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June 21, 1960: Anon. in Love, six songs for tenor and guitar or orchestra by William Walton (58) to words of that most prolific and mercurial of authors, Anonymous, is performed for the first time, at Shrubland Park Hall, Ipswich.
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September 2, 1960: Symphony no.2 by William Walton (58) is performed for the first time, in Usher Hall, Edinburgh. Critics are disappointed.
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April 18, 1961: William Walton (59) becomes the 14th Honorary Freeman of the Borough of Oldham.
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June 3, 1961: A suite from the ballet The Quest by William Walton (59) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London. See 6 April 1943.
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November 24, 1961: Gloria for alto, tenor, bass, chorus, and orchestra by William Walton (59) is performed for the first time, in Huddersfield Town Hall, to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the Huddersfield Choral Society.
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February 4, 1962: William Walton (59) is appointed accademico onorario di Santa Cecilia in Rome.
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March 17, 1962: Fanfare for a Great Occasion for brass by William Walton (59) is performed for the first time, in Centennial Hall, Wayville, Australia.
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July 18, 1962: A Song for the Lord Mayor’s Table, six songs for soprano and piano by William Walton (60) to words of various authors, is performed for the first time, in Goldsmiths Hall, London. See 7 July 1970.
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March 8, 1963: Variations on a Theme by Hindemith for orchestra by William Walton (60) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London the composer conducting. The work was commissioned by the Royal Philharmonic Society to celebrate its 150th anniversary.
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May 16, 1965: The Twelve for chorus and organ by William Walton (63) to words of Auden, is performed for the first time, in Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford. See 2 January 1966.
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January 2, 1966: The Twelve for chorus and orchestra by William Walton (63) to words of Auden is performed for the first time, in Westminster Abbey, London the composer conducting. The ceremony marks the 900th anniversary of Westminster Abbey. See 16 May 1965.
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January 10, 1966: William Walton (63) undergoes an operation at the London Clinic for a suspected case of lung cancer.
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February 21, 1966: William Walton (63) returns to his home on Ischia after hospitalization following his operation of 10 January.
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June 3, 1967: The Bear, an opera by William Walton (65) to words of Dehn and the composer after Chekhov, is performed for the first time, in Jubilee Hall, Aldeburgh.
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November 21, 1967: William Walton (65) receives the Order of Merit.
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April 26, 1968: William Walton (66) receives an honorary doctorate from the University of Sussex.
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December 7, 1968: Capriccio burlesco for orchestra by William Walton (66) is performed for the first time, in Philharmonic Hall, New York. The work was commissioned by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra to celebrate its 125th anniversary.
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September 15, 1969: The Battle of Britain, a film including some music by William Walton (67), is shown for the first time, in the Dominion Cinema, London.
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January 14, 1970: Improvisations on an Impromptu by Benjamin Britten for orchestra by William Walton (67) is performed for the first time, at the War Memorial Opera House, San Francisco.
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July 1, 1970: William Walton (68) attends the annual lunch of the Performing Right Society in London where the Prince of Wales is guest of honor. Each composer member has been invited to contribute a piece for an album to be presented to the prince. Walton includes the Theme (for variations) for cello. Prince Charles is a cellist.
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July 7, 1970: A Song for the Lord Mayor’s Table, a cycle for solo voice and orchestra by William Walton (68) to words of Blake, Jordan, Morris, Wordsworth, and anonymous, is performed for the first time, in Mansion House, London. See 18 July 1962.
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August 26, 1970: Three Sisters, a film with music by William Walton (68), is shown for the first time, in Sala Volpi, Venice.
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January 17, 1972: William Walton (69) is awarded the Benjamin Franklin medal by the Royal Society of Arts for his work for Anglo-American understanding.
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February 13, 1972: The second of the Five Bagatelles for guitar by William Walton (69) is performed for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London. See 27 May 1972.
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March 2, 1972: Sonata for strings by William Walton (69), an arrangement of his String Quartet in a minor, is performed for the first time, in the Octagon Theatre, Perth, Australia.
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March 28, 1972: Variations on A Happy Birthday for orchestra by Thea Musgrave (43), Peter Maxwell Davies (37), and four other British composers is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London. The variations are in honor of the 70th birthday of William Walton.
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March 29, 1972: Prime Minister Edward Heath officiates at a dinner honoring the 70th birthday of William Walton. The composer is in attendance as is Queen Elizabeth and her mother, Benjamin Britten (58), Arthur Bliss, Kenneth Clark, Herbert Howells, Henry Moore and Laurence Olivier. The first three of the Five Bagatelles for guitar by William Walton are performed for the first time today, over the airwaves of BBC television originating in London. See 27 May 1972.
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April 22, 1972: Jubilate Deo for chorus and organ by William Walton (70) is performed for the first time, at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford.
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May 27, 1972: Five Bagatelles for guitar by William Walton (70) is performed completely for the first time, in the Bath Assembly Rooms.
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June 12, 1973: William Walton (71) conducts Façade on its 50th anniversary in Aeolian Hall, London. It is the last time he conducts in public.
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November 29, 1973: Anniversary Fanfare for brass and percussion by William Walton (71) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London in a concert celebrating the 75th anniversary of EMI.
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April 25, 1974: Cantico del sole for chorus by William Walton (72) to words of St. Francis, is performed for the first time, at University College, Cork.
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June 14, 1975: Magnificat and Nunc dimittis for chorus and organ by William Walton (73) is performed for the first time, in Chichester Cathedral.
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April 1, 1976: Fanfare for the National for brass by William Walton (74) is performed for the first time, in DeLane Studios, Wembley.
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May 4, 1976: Varii capricci for orchestra by William Walton (74) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London. The work is a free transcription of the composer’s Five Bagatelles for Guitar and was commissioned by the Greater London Council for the 25th anniversary of the opening of Royal Festival Hall. See 27 May 1972.
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June 3, 1976: As Queen Elizabeth II arrives to open the new Lion Terraces at the London Zoo, Roaring Fanfare for brass by William Walton (74) is performed for the first time.
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August 21, 1976: Fanfare for the National, composed by William Walton (74) for the opening of the National Theatre, is performed publicly for the first time, over the airwaves of London Weekend Television.
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November 12, 1976: The revised version of William Walton’s (74) opera Troilus and Cressida to words of Hassall is performed for the first time, at Covent Garden. See 13 December 1954.
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June 25, 1977: William Walton’s (75) Prelude for orchestra is performed for the first time, in St. John’s, Smith Square, London as part of the celebrations surrounding Queen Elizabeth’s Silver Jubilee.
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November 20, 1977: Antiphon for chorus and organ by William Walton (75), to words of Herbert, is performed for the first time, in St. Paul’s Church, Rochester, New York. The work was commissioned by St. Paul’s Church to celebrate its 150th anniversary.
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December 24, 1977: King Herod and the Cock for chorus by William Walton (75) to anonymous words, is performed for the first time, in King’s College Chapel, Cambridge.
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January 26, 1978: The title music for the BBC television Shakespeare series, composed by William Walton (75), is performed for the first time, in a recording session in London. See 3 December 1978.
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December 3, 1978: The title music for the BBC television Shakespeare series, composed by William Walton (76), is broadcast for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC-2 television. See 26 January 1978.
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June 5, 1979: Introduction to the British National Anthem for twelve trumpets by William Walton (77) is performed for the first time, in the Royal Festival Hall, London. The work is performed tonight as Salute to Sir Robert Mayer on his 100th Birthday .
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June 19, 1979: Façade 2 for chamber ensemble and reciter by William Walton (77) to words of E. Sitwell, is performed for the first time, in Snape Maltings.
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April 19, 1981: At the Haunted End of Day, a television profile of William Walton (79), is shown for the first time, on British television.
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September 7, 1981: The First Shoot, music for brass arranged from the ballet by William Walton (79), is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London. See 4 February 1936.
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October 10, 1981: A Birthday Fanfare for seven trumpets and percussion by William Walton (79) is performed for the first time, in Recklinghausen at the home of the dedicatee, Karl-Friedrich Still. Still is a neighbor of the composer on Ischia.
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February 20, 1982: Prologo e Fantasia for orchestra by William Walton (79) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London.
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March 16, 1982: Passacaglia for solo cello by William Walton (79) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London.
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July 22, 1982: William Walton (80) and his wife Susanna are filmed at their home on Ischia playing the King and Queen of Saxony in Tony Palmer’s film Wagner .
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March 8, 1983: 07:00 William Turner Walton dies of a lung hemorrhage at his home La Mortella at Via Francesco Calise Operaio Foriano, 39 on the island of Ischia, aged 80 years, eleven months, and eight days. The composer has been ill recently but death is sudden. Within four hours, a thousand of the local villagers arrive at his villa to pay homage.
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March 11, 1983: The mortal remains of William Walton are cremated in Florence. They will be interred on his estate on the island of Ischia.
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April 19, 1983: Varii capricci, a ballet by William Walton (†0) is performed for the first time, at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York. It is an arrangement of his Five Bagatelles for guitar.
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July 20, 1983: A thanksgiving service in memory of William Walton (†0) takes place in Westminster Abbey. During the ceremony, a memorial stone is unveiled in the floor of Musician’s Corner.
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April 29, 1985: Theme (for variations) for cello solo by William Walton (†2) is performed for the first time, in Villa Wolkonsy, Rome. The work is part of Music for a Prince, a collection of pieces by 14 composers for Prince Charles in 1970. Also premiered is Walton’s 1970 composition All This Time for chorus to anonymous words.
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May 10, 1985: A suite from the film score The Battle of Britain by William Walton (†2) arranged by Carl Davis is performed for the first time, in Colston Hall, Bristol.