A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Vladimir Ussachevsky

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November 3, 1911: Vladimir Alyekseyevich Ussachevsky is born in Hailar, Chinese Empire, in the far north of Inner Mongolia, the last of four children born to Alyeksey Ivanovich Ussachevsky, a Russian army officer, and Maria Mikhailovna Panov, a professionally trained pianist. The father is posted to northern Manchuria to protect Russian interests on the Trans-Siberian Railway.
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May 13, 1935: Classical Suite and Two Minuets for piano by Vladimir Ussachevsky (23) are performed for the first time, at Pomona College, Claremont California by the composer on his senior recital. Also premiered is Ussachevsky’s cantata Praise Ye O Lord.
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March 19, 1936: Solemn Prelude for orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (24) is performed for the first time, at the Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York conducted by Howard Hanson (39). It is the composer’s master’s thesis.
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February 13, 1938: Jubilee Cantata for baritone, narrator, chorus, and orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (26) is performed for the first time, at Pomona College, Claremont, California to celebrate its 50th anniversary. Also premiered is Ussachevsky’s Lord’s Prayer for male chorus.
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September 28, 1942: Vladimir Ussachevsky (30) is inducted into the United States Army.
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February 26, 1943: Vladimir Ussachevsky (32), currently a member of the US Army, marries Elizabeth Denison Kray, a poet, in Seattle.
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April 1, 1944: Vladimir Ussachevsky (32) completes the US Army Specialized Training Program in Chinese Area and Language Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle.
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November 7, 1945: Vladimir Ussachevsky (34) is honorably discharged from the United States Army.
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November 28, 1949: Psalm 24 for chorus, organ, and brass by Vladimir Ussachevsky (38) is performed for the first time, in Princeton, New Jersey.
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May 5, 1951: Miniatures for a Curious Child for orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (39) is performed for the first time, at Columbia University conducted by the composer.
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August 23, 1951: Intermezzo for piano and orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (39) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont conducted by Otto Luening (51).
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May 8, 1952: Transposition, Reverberation, Experiment, Composition and Underwater Valse for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (40) are performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre at Columbia University in the first public demonstration of music from magnetic tape. Also premiered is Ussachevsky’s Two Autumn Songs on Rilke’s Text for voice and piano the composer at the keyboard. See 28 October 1952.
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October 28, 1952: The first public “concert” of tape-recorder music in the United States takes place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. It is given by the Columbia University electronic music group and includes premieres of Sonic Contours for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (41) and three works for flute on tape by Otto Luening: Fantasy in Space, Invention in Twelve Tones, and Low Speed . The flutist in all three Luening pieces is the composer. The performance is broadcast by radio stations WNYC New York and WGBH Boston. A Tanglewood student named Luciano Berio (27) is present and is fascinated. Also premiered is Eight Studies and a Fantasy for flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon by Elliott Carter (43).
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October 25, 1953: Incantation for tape by Otto Luening (53) and Vladimir Ussachevsky is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Columbia Broadcasting System, originating in New York.
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March 20, 1954: Rhapsodic Variations for orchestra and electronic tape by Otto Luening (53) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (42) is performed for the first time, in Louisville.  It is perhaps the first instance of a concert involving tape and orchestra.
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August 16, 1954: Of Identity, a ballet with music by Otto Luening (54) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (42), is performed for the first time, privately in Westport, Connecticut. See 9 February 1955.
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November 18, 1954: A Poem in Cycles and Bells for tape and orchestra by Otto Luening (54) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (43) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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February 9, 1955: Of Identity, a ballet by Otto Luening (54) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (43), is performed publicly for the first time, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York.
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July 14, 1955: To Catch a Thief, a film with sound effects by Vladimir Ussachevsky (43), is shown for the first time, in Hollywood.
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January 12, 1956: Incidental music for Shakespeare’s play King Lear by Marc Blitzstein (50), with electronic sounds by Otto Luening (55) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (44), is performed for the first time, in New York City Center in a production directed by and starring Orson Welles. It is a disaster. Welles has injured both legs in separate incidents and is consigned to a wheel chair. It will see 21 performances.
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March 18, 1956: A Piece for Tape Recorder by Vladimir Ussachevsky (44) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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February 17, 1957: Metamorphoses for tape, electronic instruments, and percussion by Vladimir Ussachevsky (45) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 26, 1958: Incidental music to Shaw’s play Back to Methuselah by Otto Luening (57) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (46) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 13, 1958: Studies in Sound for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (46) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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June 5, 1958: Incidental music to Meredith’s play Ulysses in Nighttown for electronic sound generators by Otto Luening (57) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (46) is performed for the first time, in the Rooftop Theatre, New York.
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February 20, 1959: The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center comes into existence with the beginning of a grant of $175,000 to the two universities. The directors are Otto Luening (58) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (47) at Columbia, and Milton Babbitt (42) and Roger Sessions (62) at Princeton.
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March 11, 1959: Studies in Sound, Plus for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (47) is performed for the first time, in Kaufmann Concert Hall, New York.
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May 14, 1959: Sound effects for the opera Glittering Gate by Vladimir Ussachevsky (47) are performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 26, 1960: Concerted Piece for tape recorder and orchestra by Otto Luening (59) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (48) is performed for the first time, in New York, conducted by Leonard Bernstein (41). This is a taped “Young People’s Concert” which will be aired tomorrow. The official premiere will take place on 31 March.
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August 26, 1960: Wireless Fantasy for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (48) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 9, 1961: The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center gives its inaugural concert before an invited audience in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University. Gargoyles for violin solo and synthesized sound by Otto Luening (60) is performed for the first time, as are the Prologue and Interlude from The Creation for mezzo-soprano, two choruses, and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (49). See 19 May 1971.
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July 3, 1962: No Exit, a film with music by Vladimir Ussachevsky (50), is shown for the first time, at the Berlin Film Festival.
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May 22, 1963: The American Academy of Arts and Letters awards $2,500 grants to Mel Powell (40) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (51).
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April 19, 1965: Of Wood and Brass for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (53) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre of Columbia University.
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December 15, 1965: A concert in memory of Edgar Varèse takes place in the McMillin Theatre of Columbia University. The provost, Jacques Barzun delivers a brief address as does Otto Luening (65). Some film of Thomas Bouchard is shown as well as a recording of recent remarks by Varèse. Charles Wuorinen (27) directs a performance of Varèse’s Octandre. Density 21.5 is performed. Excerpts from Déserts are played as well as Poème électronique, adapted for the occasion by Vladimir Ussachevsky (54).
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March 17, 1967: Sound effects for Levy’s opera Mourning Becomes Electra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (55) are performed for the first time, at the Metropolitan Opera, New York.
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July 30, 1967: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play Macbeth by Vladimir Ussachevsky (55) is performed for the first time, in Stratford, Connecticut.
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December 25, 1967: Line of Apogee, a film with music by Vladimir Ussachevsky (56) is shown for the first time, at the International Experimental Film Festival in Belgium.
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April 5, 1968: Olly Wilson (30) wins the first competition devoted to electronic music, at Dartmouth College with his composition Cetus. The three judges are Milton Babbitt (51), Vladimir Ussachevsky (56), and George Balch Wilson.
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June 10, 1968: Computer Piece no.1 by Vladimir Ussachevsky (56) is performed for the first time, in the Instituto Torcuato di Tella, Buenos Aires.
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October 13, 1968: An episode of the CBS television program The Twenty-first Century, entitled “Incredible Voyage”, with a sound track by Vladimir Ussachevsky (56), is shown for the first time, over the airwaves of the CBS television network.
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October 17, 1968: Incidental music to Tabori’s play The Cannibals by Vladimir Ussachevsky (56) is performed for the first time, in the American Place Theatre, New York.
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January 21, 1969: Two Images for the Computer Piece, a film with music by Vladimir Ussachevsky (57), is shown for the first time, at the Whitney Museum, New York.
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November 30, 1970: Two Sketches for Computer Piece no.2 by Vladimir Ussachevsky (59) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre of Columbia University.
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December 3, 1970: Suite from Music for Films for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (59) is performed for the first time, at Weber State College, Ogden, Utah.
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February 23, 1971: We, a radio play with music by Vladimir Ussachevsky (59), is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
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March 25, 1971: Sound effects for the musical Flibbertygibbet by Vladimir Ussachevsky (59) are performed for the first time, at Weber State College, Ogden, Utah.
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May 19, 1971: The Creation for vocal soloists, choruses, and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (59) is performed for the first time, in Salt Lake City.
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November 19, 1973: Inauguration Fanfares for brass and timpani by Vladimir Ussachevsky (62) is performed for the first time, at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City.
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February 20, 1976: Colloquy for solo instruments, orchestra, and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (64) to words of XJ Kennedy is performed for the first time, in Salt Lake City.
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March 28, 1980: Celebration 1980 for electronic valve instrument, string orchestra, and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (68) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University, to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Columbia University Graduate School.
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April 26, 1980: Four Studies for clarinet and electronic valve instrument by Vladimir Ussachevsky (68) is performed for the first time, at Bowling Green State University, Ohio.
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July 1, 1980: Vladimir Ussachevsky (68) retires from the faculty of Columbia University.
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January 18, 1981: Suite for twelve trombones by Vladimir Ussachevsky (69) is performed for the first time, at the Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore.
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March 23, 1981: Dances and Fanfares for a Festive Occasion for orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (69) is performed for the first time, at Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield.
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October 30, 1981: Divertimento for electronic valve instrument, flute, oboe, clarinet, trumpet, horn, trombone, string orchestra, and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (70) is performed for the first time, in Brooklyn, conducted by Lukas Foss (59).
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July 8, 1982: Mimicry for alto saxophone and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (70) is performed for the first time, in Nuremberg.
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November 17, 1982: Triskelion for oboe and piano by Vladimir Ussachevsky (71) is performed for the first time, at the Library of Congress.
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June 9, 1983: Novelette pour Bourges for electronic valve instrument and piano by Vladimir Ussachevsky (71) is performed for the first time, in Bourges.
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February 12, 1984: Dialogues and Contrasts for brass quintet and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (72) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Hall, New York.
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April 16, 1985: Works for piano by Vladimir Ussachevsky (73) are performed for the first time, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison: Left Hand Rehabilitation Piano Pieces, Mini Preludes, Right Hand Study no.1, Right Hand Study no.2 and Three Voice Fugue for Right Hand Alone.
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December 10, 1985: Anniversary Variations for brass quintet by Vladimir Ussachevsky (74) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 31, 1988: To the Young for chorus and orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (76) to words of Levertov and Rilke is performed for the first time, at Pomona College, Claremont, California.
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January 4, 1990: Vladimir Alexis Ussachevsky dies of a brain tumor in Calvary Hospital, New York City, USA, aged 78 years, two months, and one day.  His mortal remains will be laid to rest in Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx.