A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Joan Tower

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September 6, 1938: Joan Peabody Tower is born in New Rochelle, New York, USA, second of three children born to George Warren Tower III, a mining engineer, and Anna Peabody Robinson.
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April 19, 1961: Pillars for two pianos and percussion by Joan Tower (22) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont.
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January 24, 1964: Percussion Quartet by Joan Tower (25) is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music, New York.
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November 17, 1967: Opa Eboni for oboe and piano by Joan Tower (29) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 17, 1968: Movements for flute and piano by Joan Tower (29) is performed for the first time, in New York, the composer at the keyboard.
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May 17, 1971: Six Variations for cello by Joan Tower (32) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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October 21, 1971: Prelude for Five Players for flute, oboe or violin, clarinet, bassoon or cello, and piano by Joan Tower (33) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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February 26, 1972: Hexachords for flute by Joan Tower (33) is performed for the first time, at New York University, New York City.
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April 30, 1975: Breakfast Rhythms I&II for six players by Joan Tower (36) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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April 21, 1976: Platinum Spirals for violin by Joan Tower (37) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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November 15, 1976: Black Topaz for seven players by Joan Tower (38) is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music, New York.
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January 11, 1978: Amazon I for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano by Joan Tower (39) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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November 10, 1979: Amazon II for chamber orchestra by Joan Tower (41) is performed for the first time, in Kingston, New York.
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March 23, 1980: Several world premieres take place in Alice Tully Hall, New York to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Da Capo Chamber Players, founded by Joan Tower (41): Joan’s for flute, clarinet in A, violin, cello, and piano by Charles Wuorinen (41), Private Game for clarinet and cello by Shulamit Ran (30), Scherzo by George Perle (64), Modern Love Waltz by Philip Glass (43), and Petroushskates by Joan Tower.
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May 18, 1981: Sequoia for orchestra by Joan Tower (42) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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December 14, 1981: Wings for clarinet by Joan Tower (43) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Recital Hall, New York.
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February 28, 1983: Noon Dance for six players by Joan Tower (44) is performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre of Harvard University.
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April 18, 1983: Snow Dreams for flute and guitar by Joan Tower (44) is performed for the first time, in St. Paul, Minnesota.
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November 4, 1983: Fantasy…(Those Harbor Lights) for clarinet and piano by Joan Tower (45) is performed for the first time, in Bangor, Maine.
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September 29, 1984: Music for Cello and Orchestra by Joan Tower (46) is performed for the first time, at the 92nd Street Y, New York.
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June 29, 1985: Island Rhythms for orchestra by Joan Tower (46) is performed for the first time, in Tampa, Florida.
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August 3, 1985: Clocks for guitar by Joan Tower (46) is performed for the first time, in Ordway Music Theatre, St. Paul, Minnesota.
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January 31, 1986: Piano Concerto no.1 by Joan Tower (47) is performed for the first time, in Kingston, New York.
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January 9, 1987: Silver Ladders for orchestra by Joan Tower (48) is performed for the first time, in Powell Symphony Hall, St. Louis.
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January 10, 1987: Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman no.1 for brass and percussion by Joan Tower (48) is performed for the first time, in Jones Hall, Houston.
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April 10, 1988: Clarinet Concerto by Joan Tower (49) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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October 24, 1988: Several works in honor of the 50th birthday of Joan Tower are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York, including For Joan on her 50 th for five players by John Corigliano (50), Minuet from Short Suite for four players by John Harbison (49), and Tower Power for five players by Joseph Schwantner (45).
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August 9, 1989: Island Prelude for oboe and wind quartet by Joan Tower (50) is performed for the first time, at Arizona State University, Scottsdale. See 23 August 1989.
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August 23, 1989: Island Prelude for oboe and string quintet by Joan Tower (50) is performed for the first time, in Teton Village, Wyoming. See 9 August 1989.
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November 29, 1989: Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman no.2 for brass and percussion by Joan Tower (51) is performed for the first time, in Avery Fisher Hall, New York.
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January 28, 1990: Flute Concerto by Joan Tower (51) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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January 26, 1991: Duets for chamber orchestra by Joan Tower (52) are performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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May 5, 1991: Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman no.3 for brass by Joan Tower (52) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York as part of a gala concert celebrating the 100th anniversary of the hall.
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May 16, 1991: Concerto for orchestra by Joan Tower (52) is performed for the first time, in Powell Hall, St. Louis.
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April 24, 1992: Violin Concerto by Joan Tower (53) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Salt Lake City.
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October 16, 1992: Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman no.4 for orchestra by Joan Tower (54) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Kansas City.
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April 1, 1993: Stepping Stones, a ballet by Joan Tower (54) to a choreography by Posin, is performed for the first time, in Milwaukee.
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August 6, 1993: Elegy (“…Forgive These Wild and Wandering Cries…”) for trombone and string quartet by Joan Tower (54) is performed for the first time, in Norfolk, Connecticut.
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August 20, 1993: Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman no.5 for four trumpets by Joan Tower (54) is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado.
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March 1, 1994: Night Fields for string quartet by Joan Tower (55) is performed for the first time, at the University of Iowa, Iowa City.
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May 8, 1994: Trés Lent for cello and piano by Joan Tower (55) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York the composer at the piano.
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June 13, 1994: New works are premiered at the 50th anniversary concert of WNYC in Alice Tully Hall, New York: Now, so long after that time for piano by Philip Glass (57), How Like Pellucid Statues, Daddy for bassoon quartet by John Corigliano (56), and “Or Like a…an Engine” from No Longer Very Clear: a Suite for Piano by Joan Tower (55).
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June 13, 1994: New works are premiered at the 50th anniversary concert of WNYC in Alice Tully Hall, New York, all based on a new poem by John Ashberry:  No Longer Very Clear for soprano, flute, clarinet, violin, and cello by Milton Babbitt (78), Chapbook for piano-six hands by Peter Schickele (58), Now, so long after that time for piano by Philip Glass (57), How Like Pellucid Statues, Daddy for bassoon quartet by John Corigliano (56), "Or Like a...an Engine" from No Longer Very Clear: a Suite for Piano by Joan Tower (55), This House of Blues for tape by Laurie Anderson (47), and In This House of Blues for voice, clarinet, and piano by Anthony Davis (43), the composer at the keyboard.
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January 28, 1995: Duets for orchestra by Joan Tower (56) is performed for the first time, in Ambassador Auditorium, Los Angeles.
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April 21, 1995: Turning Points for clarinet and string quartet by Joan Tower (56) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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February 14, 1996: New works are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York:  Valentine Piece for flute and little bell by Henryk Górecki (62), Valentine Trills for flute by Joan Tower (57), and Valentine for flute by Christopher Rouse on the eve of his 47th birthday.
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March 2, 1996: Rapids for orchestra by Joan Tower (57) is performed for the first time, at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
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March 19, 1996: “Holding a Daisy” from No Longer Very Clear: a Suite for Piano by Joan Tower (57) is performed for the first time, in Miller Theatre of Columbia University.
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May 19, 1996: Yet Another Set of Variations (on a Theme by Paganini): Paganini Trills by Joan Tower (57) is performed for the first time, in Powell Hall, St. Louis.
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July 8, 1996: Ascent for organ by Joan Tower (57) is performed for the first time, in St. Ignatius Loyola Church, New York.
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June 4, 1997: And...They’re Off for violin, cello, and piano by Joan Tower (58) is performed for the first time, in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
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June 8, 1997: Joan Tower (58) makes her conducting debut, at a concert of her works in Halifax.
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June 27, 1997: Toccanta for oboe and harpsichord by Joan Tower (58) is performed for the first time, at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
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December 14, 1997: Rain Waves for clarinet, violin, and piano by Joan Tower (59) is performed for the first time, in the Frick Museum, New York.
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May 7, 1998: Tambor for orchestra by Joan Tower (59) is performed for the first time, in Heinz Hall, Pittsburgh.
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May 20, 1998: Joan Tower (59) is inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
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September 10, 1998: Wild Purple for solo viola by Joan Tower (60) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York.
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February 24, 2000: The Last Dance for orchestra by Joan Tower (61) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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August 6, 2000: Big Sky for violin, cello, and piano by Joan Tower (61) is performed for the first time, in La Jolla, California.
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September 16, 2000: Vast Antique Cubes for piano by Joan Tower (62) is performed for the first time, at Franklin and Marshall University, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Also premiered are “Vast Antique Cubes” and “Throbbing Still” from Tower’s No Longer Very Clear: a Suite for Piano .
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February 22, 2001: Fascinating Ribbons for winds, percussion, and piano by Joan Tower (62) is performed for the first time, in Denton, Texas.
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October 4, 2001: Strike Zones, a concerto for percussion and orchestra by Joan Tower (63), is performed for the first time, at the Kennedy Center, Washington.
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February 23, 2002: In Memory for string quartet by Joan Tower (63) is performed for the first time, at the 92nd Street Y, New York.
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April 13, 2003: DNA for percussion quintet by Joan Tower (64) is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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April 26, 2003: Incandescent for string quartet by Joan Tower (64) is performed for the first time, in Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.
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March 2, 2004: Piano Trio by Joan Tower (65) is performed for the first time, in Tucson, Arizona.
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October 9, 2004: Joan Tower (66) is inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in Boston.
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October 2, 2005: Made in America for orchestra by Joan Tower (67) is performed for the first time, in Glen’s Falls, New York. In a project funded by the Ford Motor Company Fund, the work is intended to be performed by community orchestras in each of the 50 United States over the next two years.
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November 4, 2005: Purple Rhapsody, a concerto for viola and orchestra by Joan Tower (67), is performed for the first time, in Omaha, Nebraska.
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May 4, 2006: Copperwave for brass quintet by Joan Tower (67) is performed for the first time, at the Juilliard School, New York.
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May 6, 2006: Chamber Dance for “large chamber group without conductor” by Joan Tower (67) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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July 10, 2006: A Gift for flute and clarinet by Joan Tower (67) is performed for the first time, in Portland, Oregon.
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August 18, 2007: Trio La Jolla for violin, cello, and piano by Joan Tower (68) is performed for the first time, in La Jolla, California.
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February 12, 2008: A Gift for flute/piccolo, clarinet, bassoon, horn, and piano by Joan Tower (69) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 12, 2008: Dumbarton Quintet for piano quintet by Joan Tower (69) is performed for the first time, at Dumbarton Oaks, Washington.
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April 27, 2008: Simply Purple for viola by Joan Tower (69) is performed for the first time, at the New York Society for Ethical Culture at 2 West 64th Street.
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April 27, 2008: Can I for treble voices by Joan Tower (69) is performed for the first time, in Miller Theatre, New York.
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August 31, 2008: Angels (String Quartet no.4) by Joan Tower (69) is performed for the first time, at Angel Fire, New Mexico.
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February 27, 2010: For Marianne for flute by Joan Tower (71) is performed for the first time, at the Brooklyn Museum, New York.
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March 31, 2010: Rising for flute and string quartet by Joan Tower (71) is performed for the first time, at the Juilliard School, New York.
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May 13, 2011: Stroke for orchestra by Joan Tower (72) is performed for the first time, in Pittsburgh.
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February 10, 2012: Steps for piano by Joan Tower (73) is performed for the first time, at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York.
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April 14, 2012: White Water for string quartet by Joan Tower (73) is performed for the first time, in Carmel, California.
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May 10, 2012: Catching a Wave for cello and piano by Joan Tower (73) is performed for the first time, at John Jay College, New York, the composer at the keyboard.
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March 3, 2013: Four works for chorus are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York: Starlight by Thea Musgrave (84) to words of Longfellow, Why Was Cupid a Boy? by William Bolcom (74) to words of Blake, The Devil’s Game by Richard Wernick (79), and Descending by Joan Tower (74).
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October 4, 2013: Red Maple for bassoon and strings by Joan Tower (75) is performed for the first time, in Columbia, South Carolina.
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March 1, 2014: Still/Rapids for piano and orchestra by Joan Tower (75) is performed for the first time, in Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, New York.
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March 16, 2015: Second String Force for violin by Joan Tower (76) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York.
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May 19, 2015: Red Maple for bassoon and string quartet by Joan Tower (76) is performed for the first time, in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
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April 24, 2016: Purple Rush for viola by Joan Tower (77) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 7, 2016: Sixth Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman for orchestra by Joan Tower (77) is performed for the first time, in Baltimore.
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June 20, 2016: Power Dance for organ by Joan Tower (77) is performed for the first time, in Houston.