A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Mikis Theodorakis

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May 9, 1936: A general strike takes place in Thessaloniki to protest the Metaxas dictatorship. Police fire on a crowd killing 30 and wounding hundreds. The events inspire Iannis Ritsos to compose a series of poems called Epitafios, laments of a mother over her dead sons. In 1958 they will be set to music by Mikis Theodorakis (10).
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March 25, 1942: Mikis Theodorakis (16) is arrested for hitting an Italian officer during a demonstration in Tripolis at the grave of Theodoros Kolokotronis, hero of the Greek war of independence. While in prison he will be tortured and introduced to communism.
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October 12, 1944: World War II: Soviet forces take Oradea, Romania. Soviets and Yugoslav partisans take Subotica near the Hungarian border.

The three-year-old blackout restrictions in Leningrad are lifted.

British paratroopers land at Megara airfield, 15 km from Athens as the Germans evacuate Piraeus. The British also land on Corfu. Vasilis Zannos, a minister in the National Liberation Front, together with Mikis Theodorakis (19) disarm the staff of the Luftwaffe. The weapons are handed over to the Lord Byron student group, whose members include Iannis Xenakis (22).

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December 3, 1944: Civil War in Greece erupts as British troops and Greek police open fire on a massive leftist demonstration in Athens, killing 28 and wounding 100. The job of dispersing the crowd is accomplished with tanks. Among the injured is Mikis Theodorakis (19), struck by a British rifle butt. Of the day he remembers, “It was the first time I had seen so much blood.”
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March 26, 1946: A large demonstration takes place in Athens against the elections scheduled for 31 March. They are attacked by soldiers and police and many are injured in the beatings, including Mikis Theodorakis (20). He is knocked unconscious and awakes lying in a morgue surrounded by corpses. See 27 March 1946.
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March 27, 1946: After awakening in a morgue following a brutal beating by police, friends of Mikis Theodorakis (20) get him transferred to a more secure hospital where he is diagnosed with a fractured skull and operated on. He will be hospitalized for two months. The beating causes permanent impairment of the vision in his left eye. See 26 March 1946.
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July 5, 1947: Almost 10,000 Greek citizens considered “dangerous to the public order” for their political beliefs are arrested. One of them is Mikis Theodorakis (21).
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September 8, 1947: Themistoklis Panagiotou Sophoulis replaces Konstantinos Stavrou Tsaldaris as Prime Minister of Greece. The more moderate stance of the new government allows for the release of many leftists in prison for their political beliefs, among them Mikis Theodorakis (22).
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May 1, 1948: As he exits a church in Athens, Christos Ladas, Justice Minister of Greece, is assassinated. He is overseeing the arrest, deportation, and execution of thousands of Greek citizens believed to hold left-of-center views. Mikis Theodorakis (22) is arrested at his parents’ home. He will be charged with crimes his 15 cellmates are charged with and sentenced to exile on the island of Ikaria.
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March 26, 1949: Mikis Theodorakis (23) is one of 35 political prisoners left out of an original number of 30,000 on the island of Makronissos. They refuse to sign a loyalty document and are beaten for ten hours. Theodorakis is tortured until his right leg is broken and his jaw dislocated. He is shortly transferred to a military hospital in Athens where he will remain for two months.
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May 5, 1950: The Asi-Gonia Festival, a ballet by Mikis Theodorakis (24), is performed for the first time, at Athens Conservatory. It is a smashing success with the public and press. The composer, a member of the armed forces and a recent graduate of the conservatory, is called to the stage, but he refuses. His only belt fell apart this morning and he has to hold his pants up.
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March 19, 1953: Mikis Theodorakis (27) marries Myrto Altinoglou, a newly graduated doctor. After ten years of war, imprisonment, and torture, he becomes her first patient.
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August 20, 1959: An interview appears in the Greek daily Ta Nea in which Mikis Theodorakis (34) attacks his country’s musical establishment, “they inevitably drive backwards every aspect of our musical life.”
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August 10, 1961: A Neighborhood: The Dream, a film with music by Mikis Theodorakis (36), is shown for the first time, in Athens. Police raid the theatre, stop the projection, and force everyone to leave.
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April 5, 1962: Mass demonstrations take place in Athens against the extravagance of the upcoming royal wedding. The crowds, which number in the hundreds of thousands, are attacked by police. Among them is Mikis Theodorakis (36) who, in the melee, comes upon a young woman unconscious on the street. He picks her up and gets her into a taxi for transport to a hospital.
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April 20, 1962: A dance suite from the Mikis Theodorakis’ (36) musical play The Ballad of the Dead Brother is performed for the first time, at the Rex Theatre, Athens. See 15 October 1962.
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July 17, 1962: After seeking medical care in London for a serious illness, Mikis Theodorakis (36) returns to Athens, incognito. He goes immediately to Tsangaris Sanatorium.
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October 15, 1962: The Ballad of the Dead Brother, a musical play by Mikis Theodorakis (37) to his own words, is staged for the first time, in Athens. The work causes protest, both artistically and politically, from all sides of the political spectrum.
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February 10, 1963: Mikis Theodorakis (37) and the poet Yiannis Ritsos are invited to a public rally by the Bertrand Russell Peace Movement which leads pacifism in Greece. After a series of disturbances by Stalinists, an audience member rushes the platform and wrests the microphone from Theodorakis. The two argue, which brings the audience to the support of one or the other. The meeting is ended before it can dissolve into a riot.
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April 21, 1963: The Peace Movement in Greece begins the first Marathon March. The government arrests several thousand people to stop it, including Mikis Theodorakis (37). Shielded by his parliamentary immunity, the march leader, Grigoris Lambrakis, makes the march alone.
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May 22, 1963: Greek deputy Grigoris Lambrakis, leader of the peace movement, is run down in the streets of Thessaloniki by conservative thugs after a meeting. Another deputy, George Tsaroukhas has his skull fractured. Within hours, Mikis Theodorakis (37) arrives in the city but is immediately arrested. After strong protests from many elements of society, he is released to visit Lambrakis.
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June 2, 1963: The organization “Lambrakis Youth” is set up at a meeting of 20 Greek scientists, artists, workers, students, and journalists in Athens. It is designed to continue the work of murdered peace activist Grigoris Lambrakis. Mikis Theodorakis (37) will be elected president.
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July 23, 1963: The Lambrakis Democratic Youth opens its first hall in Athens. The hall is full with young people who overflow into the streets. After fighting through a police cordon, the group’s president, Mikis Theodorakis (37), addresses them, calling on them to organize youth groups throughout Greece, uniting all political factions in an anti-fascist movement to save democracy.
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September 2, 1963: Addressing 7,000 people in the Kokkinia soccer field in Piraeus, Mikis Theodorakis (38) traces a large letter “Z” in the air. “Let the slogan Zei (he lives) become a symbol...of the life of our movement.” It refers to the murdered peace activist Grigoris Lambrakis. Within hours, the letter Z is painted on walls throughout Athens and Piraeus.
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December 15, 1963: Mikis Theodorakis (38), running for the Greek Parliament, receives a letter threatening his life and his family.
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February 16, 1964: In Greek general elections, Mikis Theodorakis (38) is elected a deputy of the United Democratic Left from Piraeus.
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March 12, 1964: Mikis Theodorakis (38) is part of an official delegation from the United Democratic Left to the funeral of King Pavlos in Athens.
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September 17, 1964: The Lambrakis Democratic Youth, led by Mikis Theodorakis (39), merges with the youth section of the United Democratic Left to form the Lambrakis Youth Movement.
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October 18, 1964: To Axion Esti (Worth of Being), a “popular oratorio” by Mikis Theodorakis (39) to words of Elytis, is performed for the first time, in the Rex Theatre, Athens. It is wildly successful.
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November 29, 1964: In a mass celebration in Athens commemorating the first Resistance attack against the Germans during World War II, an explosion goes off killing 13 people and injuring 75. Officials call it an accidental explosion of a 1940s era torpedo. Tonight, Mikis Theodorakis (39) and fellow deputy Leonidas Kyrkos visit the site. They will announce to the press that their findings show it was a deliberately set bomb.
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July 23, 1965: Hundreds of thousands of people accompany the body of Sotiris Petroulas from Athens Cathedral to its final resting place. He was a 23-year-old student killed by a police tear gas canister two days ago. When police tried to bury the body secretly they were found out and, partly through the efforts of Mikis Theodorakis (39), were forced to turn it over.
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January 1, 1966: In his New Year’s address to the nation, King Konstantinos of Greece blames communists for the political unrest in the country. As a direct result of this speech, the music of Mikis Theodorakis (40) is banned from Greek radio.
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March 30, 1966: When Mikis Theodorakis (40) goes to a studio in Athens to record his song cycle Romiosini, he learns that the Prime Minister’s office has forbidden it because it has not received the approval of the censorship committee. He will record it in Amsterdam.
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April 3, 1966: Romiosini (Hellenism), a song cycle by Mikis Theodorakis (40) to words of Ritsos, is performed for the first time, in the Diana Theatre in Athens at an evening of protest against the presence of missile bases in Greece.
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March 22, 1967: A Piano Concerto by Mikis Theodorakis (41) is performed for the first time, in Piraeus.
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April 21, 1967: Conservative and Fascist army officers overthrow the constitutional government in Greece and take control of the country. Thousands of arrests are made. A curfew is imposed and press censorship instituted. Konstantinos Kollios replaces Panagiotis Kanellopoulos as Prime Minister. Warned by a 04:00 telephone call from a friend, Mikis Theodorakis (41) goes into hiding. This coup preempts one planned by the King’s generals for the 23rd.
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April 28, 1967: Mikis Theodorakis (41), in disguise, is transported by car through Good Friday crowds in Athens to a meeting of the leadership of his Lambrakis Democratic Youth.
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June 1, 1967: Army Order no.13 is issued in Athens. “1. We have decided and we order that throughout the country it is forbidden (a) to reproduce or play the music and songs of the composer Mikis Theodorakis (41), the former leader of the now dissolved communist organization, the Lambrakis Youth because this music is in the service of communism; (b) to sing any songs used by the communist youth movement which was dissolved under Paragraph Eight of the Decree of 6 May 1967, since these songs arouse passions and cause strife among the people. 2. Citizens who contravene this order will be brought immediately before the military tribunal and judged under martial law.”
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July 12, 1967: 23-year-old Athanassia Panagopolou is arrested in Athens for playing a recording of the music of Mikis Theodorakis (41).
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August 21, 1967: Mikis Theodorakis (42) is arrested in Khaïdari, a suburb of Athens, and brought to Security Police headquarters on Bouboulinas Street in Athens.
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September 4, 1967: After two weeks in an Athens prison, Mikis Theodorakis (42) is allowed to have paper and a pencil. He writes 32 poems in a row.
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November 1, 1967: 24-year-old Konstantinos Daoutis, a shopkeeper, is sentenced to four years in prison by a Greek military tribunal for selling a record by Mikis Theodorakis (42).
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November 2, 1967: Mikis Theodorakis (42) begins a hunger strike in prison to protest the government’s refusal to allow him as a witness at the trial of his comrades.
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November 12, 1967: After ten days of a hunger strike, Mikis Theodorakis (42) is taken from his cell to the Averoff prison hospital.
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November 21, 1967: Eight people are convicted in an Athens court of attempting to overthrow the government of Greece. They are given sentences ranging from four years to life in prison. 13 others are given suspended sentences and ten are acquitted. Mikis Theodorakis (42) was due to be a defendant in this case but is presently in a prison hospital after a hunger strike.
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January 27, 1968: After five months in prison, Mikis Theodorakis (42) is freed by the Greek military government. They promise to lift the ban on his music if he agrees to refrain from any political activity. He does not agree.
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April 26, 1968: Two works by Mikis Theodorakis (42) are performed for the first time, in London: The song cycle Love and Death for mezzo-soprano and strings to words of Mavilis and the composer, and Oedipus Tyrannus, an ode for strings. The composer is currently under house arrest in Athens.
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May 30, 1968: The Academy of Fine Arts of the German Democratic Republic names Mikis Theodorakis (42) a corresponding member, citing his music and his work for human rights.
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August 21, 1968: The Greek Security Police transfer Mikis Theodorakis (43) and his wife to the village of Zatouna in the mountains of Arcadia.
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February 26, 1969: Costa-Gavras’ film Z is released in France. Its soundtrack is collected music of Mikis Theodorakis (43), currently under house arrest in Greece.
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March 16, 1969: John Barry, a reporter for the London Sunday Times publishes an article which says that he has visited Mikis Theodorakis (43) in Zatouna where the composer is being held by the Greek Security Police. He has returned with tapes of new songs performed by Theodorakis and letters for U Thant, Secretary-General of the United Nations and the Subcommission on Human Rights of the Council of Europe. They are published in his paper today, to be excerpted in periodicals throughout the world.
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June 25, 1969: The case of Mikis Theodorakis (43) is postponed indefinitely when Greek officials refuse to allow him to leave his confinement in Zatouna to attend the court.
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July 26, 1969: The Italian daily L’Unita publishes a statement from Mikis Theodorakis (43) in which he expresses fear for his life.
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September 22, 1969: In the village of Zatouna, where Mikis Theodorakis (44) and his family are held under house arrest, the local police commander, Kostas Stergiou, bursts into the house, locks the composer in the kitchen, and proceeds to search his wife and children. While locked in, Theodorakis composes the song My Name is K.S. His wife and children are taken to Athens.
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October 19, 1969: The Greek government announces that Mikis Theodorakis (44) has been imprisoned again, at Oropos, north of Athens.
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February 6, 1970: Six foreign journalists are taken to the prison camp at Oropos to view Mikis Theodorakis (44). They watch him walk around the prison yard but do not speak with him. The journalists then report that the composer seems to be in good health. It is an attempt by the Greek dictatorship to dispel reports of mistreatment of him.
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March 9, 1970: In London, Mikis Theodorakis (44) is awarded the Anthony Asquith Prize for the score to the film Z.
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March 26, 1970: A parliamentary delegation from Scandinavia arrives in Athens with a Danish lung specialist. They are intent on giving medical treatment to Mikis Theodorakis (44), currently imprisoned by the Greek military government. They are not allowed out of the airport.
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April 9, 1970: When his tuberculosis reoccurs, Mikis Theodorakis (44) is admitted to the Sotira prison hospital.
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April 13, 1970: Mikis Theodorakis (44), the leading composer in Greece, is released after 20 months imprisonment by the Greek right-wing military government. He is flown to France for treatment of tuberculosis. The action comes through the efforts of French writer Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber. At 17:30 the two arrive at Le Bourget. However, the Greek government keeps Theodorakis’ wife and children as hostages.
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April 29, 1970: Speaking for the first time since his release, Mikis Theodorakis (44) calls for a “national council of resistance” to overthrow the Greek government.
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May 11, 1970: Almost a month after Mikis Theodorakis (44) was freed by the Greek government, his wife and children join him in Paris. They have been held as hostages but managed to escape, enduring a sea voyage to Sicily in a small boat.
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June 29, 1970: March of the Spirit, an oratorio by Mikis Theodorakis (44) to words of Sikelianos, is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London conducted by the composer.
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May 2, 1971: The National Council of Resistance, founded by Mikis Theodorakis (45) to oppose the military government of Greece, has its first meeting, in Düsseldorf.
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March 5, 1972: Mikis Theodorakis (46) announces in Melbourne that he has left the Communist Party. He intends to form a new left-wing movement.
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January 29, 1973: Mikis Theodorakis (47) tells reporters in London that he can no longer describe himself as a Communist.
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April 14, 1973: Greek police announce that eight people have been arrested for singing the music of Mikis Theodorakis (47).
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November 1, 1973: The Greek government says Mikis Theodorakis (48) may return to the country. They allow 40 songs of Theodorakis to be performed.
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July 24, 1974: Konstantinos Karamanlis returns to Athens from France and replaces Adamantios Androutsopoulos as Prime Minister of Greece. He heads the first civilian cabinet since 1967. All political prisoners are freed. Mikis Theodorakis (48) returns to Athens after four years of exile.
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October 10, 1974: The first concert by Mikis Theodorakis (49) in Greece in seven years takes place in Karaiskaki Stadium, Athens before 80,000 people.
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November 17, 1974: In the first free Greek elections since the 1967 coup, the conservative New Democracy Party of Konstaninos Karamanlis is victorious. Mikis Theodorakis (49) is defeated in his run for Parliament.
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October 18, 1981: The Panhellenc Socialist Movement wins the Greek general election. Mikis Theodorakis (56) is elected to Parliament.
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February 5, 1982: Two works by Mikis Theodorakis (56) are performed for the first time, in East Berlin: Piano Concerto, composed in 1957, and the Symphony no.2.
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April 29, 1982: Symphony no.3 by Mikis Theodorakis (56) is performed for the first time, in East Berlin. The composer is in a wheel chair from the long term effects of imprisonment and torture.
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October 16, 1982: To Axion Esti (The Worth of Being), an oratorio by Mikis Theodorakis (57) to words of Elytis, is performed for the first time (in German) at the Gewandhaus, Leipzig.
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February 23, 1983: The Passion of the Sadducees, a cantata for actor, solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Mikis Theodorakis (57) to words of Katsaros, is performed for the first time, in East Berlin.
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May 21, 1983: Liturgy no.2 “For Children who get Killed in War” for chorus by Mikis Theodorakis (57) to words of Livaditis and the composer is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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May 19, 1984: Symphony no.7 “Spring” by Mikis Theodorakis (58) is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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May 3, 1987: Symphony no.4 “Choral Odes” by Mikis Theodorakis (61) to words of Aschylos-Evmenides and Evripides-Phoenisses, is performed for the first time, in Athens.
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August 6, 1988: Zorba the Greek, a ballet with music arranged by Mikis Theodorakis (63) from his music for the film, is performed for the first time, in Verona.
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May 5, 1989: Mikis Theodorakis (63) calls for the removal of the Socialist government of Greece because of the Koskotas affair. He calls them a “government of thieves.”
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April 11, 1990: Konstantinos Kiriakou Mitsotakis replaces Xenophon Efthimiou Zolotas as Prime Minister of Greece. Mikis Theodorakis (64), who stood as an independent candidate of the left, is named Minister without Portfolio in the new right-wing government.
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October 1, 1991: Medea, an opera by Mikis Theodorakis (66) to words of Euripides, is performed for the first time, at the Opera Arriaga in Bilbao.
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May 16, 1993: President François Mitterand of France visits Mikis Theodorakis (67) at his home in Vrachati.
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May 4, 1994: A resolution of the United States Senate officially welcomes Mikis Theodorakis (68) to the country.
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June 17, 1994: Mikis Theodorakis (68) resigns as music director of the choir and two orchestras of Hellenic State Radio, attacking the media empire of Christos Lambrakis.
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March 14, 1996: Mikis Theodorakis (70) is appointed Officier of the Légion d’Honneur by the ambassador of France to Greece.
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May 24, 1996: Mikis Theodorakis (70) receives an honorary doctorate from the University of Crete.
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April 12, 1997: Mikis Theodorakis (71) conducts his music in the National Theatre of Skopje, Macedonia, at a concert attended by President Kiro Gligorov and leading members of his government, along with 200 Greeks. It is part of a movement by Greek politicians and citizens to promote friendship between Greece and Macedonia.
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May 4, 1997: A joint concert by Greek composer Mikis Theodorakis (71) and Turkish composer Zülfü Livaneli in the House of Cultures of the World in Berlin continues the efforts of the two men to bridge differences between the two countries. It is designed to be the first of a concert tour, but during the concert, Theodorakis suffers recurring respiratory problems. The tour will go on without him.
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December 16, 1997: Mikis Theodorakis (72) hands over his personal archives to the Lilian Voudouri Music Library at a ceremony in Athens.
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September 12, 1998: In a version for voice and symphony orchestra, Canto General by Mikis Theodorakis (73) is performed for the first time, in the Flämmereihalle in Linz, conducted by the composer.
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October 30, 1998: Two works by Mikis Theodorakis (73) are performed for the first time, in Philharmonic Hall, Munich conducted by the composer: Rhapsody for cello and orchestra and Concerto for guitar and orchestra.
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May 3, 1999: A complaint is filed on behalf of Mikis Theodorakis (73) with the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal at The Hague against the “political and military leadership of NATO for war crimes, that were perpetrated through the bombings from 24 March to 1 May 1999 against the former Yugoslavia.”
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May 6, 1999: Guy Wagner begins a series of 170 broadcasts over the airwaves of Radio socio-culturelle, Luxembourg which will present the complete works of Mikis Theodorakis (73). It will continue until 26 December 2002.
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May 17, 1999: Mikis Theodorakis (73) is presented with a special award by President Glafkos Clerides of Cyprus for his support of the Cypriot cause.
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October 7, 1999: Music for Sophocles’ play Antigone by Mikis Theodorakis (74) is performed for the first time, at Megaron, Athens.
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May 27, 2000: Art and Time, a film about the arrest of Mikis Theodorakis (74) and his works in prison, is shown for the first time.
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November 7, 2000: Mikis Theodorakis (75) is presented with the $250,000 Alexander S. Onassis Foundation award by Greek President Kostis Stephanopoulos at a ceremony in Athens.
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August 24, 2001: Music for Euripides’ play Medea by Mikis Theodorakis (76) is performed for the first time, at the ancient theatre of Epidavros.
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November 8, 2001: Mikis Theodorakis (76) addresses a rally in Syntagma Square, Athens protesting the US invasion of Afghanistan. The rally culminates with a march on the United States embassy.
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November 15, 2001: Mikis Theodorakis (76) undergoes prostate surgery. He will be hospitalized for four days.
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February 12, 2002: Canto Olympico by Mikis Theodorakis (76) is performed at the opening of the Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. The name of the composer is not announced, nor does it appear in any official documents.
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April 14, 2002: Lysistrati, an opera by Mikis Theodorakis (76), is performed for the first time.
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June 29, 2002: Mikis Theodorakis (76) receives the Erich W. Korngold Prize for life-achievement in film music, in Bonn.
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December 26, 2002: The 170th and last broadcast of the complete music of Mikis Theodorakis (77) is given by Guy Wagner over the airwaves of Radio socio-culturelle, Luxembourg. He has been at it since 6 May 1999.
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February 17, 2003: Mikis Theodorakis (77) addresses a rally in Athens protesting the impending invasion of Iraq by the United States.
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March 23, 2004: After a campaign by residents of the island of Ikaria, the farmhouse to which Mikis Theodorakis (78) was exiled during the Greek Civil War is now a listed building. Local authorities begin investigating the possibility of funds from the Ministry of Culture to restore the building.
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August 13, 2004: The Games of the Twenty-eighth Olympiad of the Modern Era open in Athens. At the opening ceremonies, the Olympic flag enters to an excerpt from the ballet Zorba by Mikis Theodorakis (79).
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August 18, 2004: Mikis Theodorakis (79) has his gall bladder removed at an Athens hospital.
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August 29, 2004: The Games of the Twenty-eighth Olympiad of the Modern Era close in Athens. In 17 days of competition, 10,625 athletes took part. The International Olympic Committee awards the Olympiart Prize to Mikis Theodorakis (79).
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November 23, 2004: Mikis Theodorakis (79) accepts an invitation from the Greek government to lead a campaign against firearms on Crete.
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November 30, 2004: At the Cairo Opera House, Egyptian Minister of Culture Farouk Hosny presents Mikis Theodorakis (79) with the Gold Pyramid Prize for lifetime achievement. Because of ill health, the composer is unable to attend and is represented by his niece and nephew.
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May 10, 2005: On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the defeat of fascism, President Vladimir Putin of Russia confers a commemorative medal on Mikis Theodorakis (79) at the Russian embassy in Athens.
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May 20, 2005: UNESCO and the International Music Council award the IMC-UNESCO Music Prize to Mikis Theodorakis (79).
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June 27, 2005: Erimilia (Solitude), a cycle for voice and orchestra by Mikis Theodorakis (79) to words of Papadapoulos, is performed for the first time, in the Palace of Music, Thessaloniki. It is the first of several concerts to celebrate the 80th birthday of the composer.
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October 4, 2005: The Soranos Friendship and Peace Award, given by the faculty of Dkuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey, is conferred upon Mikis Theodorakis (80). He is too ill to attend.
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November 4, 2005: The UNESCO music prize is conferred upon Mikis Theodorakis (80) in Aachen.
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October 7, 2006: The Museum-International Centre Mikis Theodorakis (81) is inaugurated in Zatouna, where the composer was exiled in 1968-69.
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March 20, 2007: Odyssey, a song cycle by Mikis Theodorakis (81) to words of Cartelias, is performed for the first time, in the Pallas Theatre, Athens, the composer at the piano.
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March 26, 2007: The French ambassador in Athens confers the honor of Commander of the Legion of Honor on Mikis Theodorakis (81) in a ceremony at the French embassy.
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October 9, 2008: Rhapsodie for trumpet and orchestra by Mikis Theodorakis (83) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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January 30, 2013: Rhapsody for string orchestra and medium voice ad. lib. by Mikis Theodorakis (87) is performed for the first time, in the Megaron, Athens.