A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Richard Strauss

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June 11, 1864: 06:00 Richard Georg Strauss is born at 2 Altheimer Eck in Munich, Kingdom of Bavaria, the eldest of two children of Franz Joseph Strauss, principal horn player of the Munich Court Orchestra, and his second wife, Josephine Pschorr, daughter of a brewer. The birth takes place in an apartment next the Pschorr brewery.
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May 31, 1872: Richard Strauss (7) hears his music for the first time when the Harbni, an amateur orchestra conducted by his father, rehearses his Panzenburg-polka at the home of Richard’s uncle Georg Pschorr in Munich. It was orchestrated by Richard’s father, Franz.
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February 23, 1873: Richard Strauss (8) appears as conductor for the first time, directing his first composition, Schneider-polka, orchestrated by his father, at a concert in Munich.
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May 29, 1880: Gavotte no.4 for orchestra by Richard Strauss (15) is performed for the first time, in Munich, conducted by the composer’s father.
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March 14, 1881: String Quartet no.2 by Richard Strauss (16) is performed for the first time, in the Museumssaal, Munich.
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March 16, 1881: Three songs for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (16) to words of Geibel are performed for the first time, in Munich: Waldgesang, O schneller mein Ross, and Die Lilien glühn in Düften.
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March 26, 1881: Festmarsch in E flat op.1 by Richard Strauss (16) is performed for the first time, in the Augsburger Hof hotel, Munich.
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March 30, 1881: Symphony in d minor by Richard Strauss (16) is performed for the first time, in the Odeonsaal, Munich.
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August 5, 1882: Richard Strauss (18) receives the final report of his gymnasium studies. His work is good, but not stellar.
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November 27, 1882: Wind Serenade in Eb op.7 by Richard Strauss (18) is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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December 5, 1882: Richard Strauss (18) makes his performing debut as pianist in a violin and piano reduction of his Violin Concerto op.8, in Vienna. It is reasonably well received. See 4 March 1890.
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November 28, 1883: Concertouvertüre in c minor by Richard Strauss (19) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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December 8, 1883: Cello Sonata in F op.6 by Richard Strauss (19) is performed for the first time, in the Hotel Goldner Adler, Nuremberg.
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December 21, 1883: Richard Strauss (19) arrives in Berlin where he will stay for over three months. Here he will make acquaintances with important musical people and promote his music.
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March 29, 1884: After three months of going to concerts, promoting his music and meeting important people, Richard Strauss (19) departs Berlin for home in Munich.
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October 22, 1884: Richard Strauss (20) learns that his Suite in B flat is to be performed in Munich and that he is to be the conductor, at the invitation of Hans von Bülow.
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November 18, 1884: Suite in B flat by Richard Strauss (20) is performed for the first time, in Munich, conducted by the composer at the invitation of Hans von Bülow. This is Strauss’ first professional appearance as a conductor and he does so without rehearsal with the orchestra.
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November 19, 1884: At the suggestion of Hans von Bülow, Richard Strauss (20) writes to Johannes Brahms (51) about his Suite in B flat to ask his opinion.
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December 13, 1884: Symphony no.2 in f minor by Richard Strauss (20) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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December 15, 1884: Richard Strauss (20) receives an indirect answer from Johannes Brahms (51) through the horn player Gustav Leinhos. “When he gave me back your Suite he spoke very highly of your work, though he had looked in vain for the spring of melody which ought to be overflowing at your age.” See 19 November 1884.
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January 8, 1885: A Festmarsch in D for orchestra by Richard Strauss (20) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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January 12, 1885: Engelbert Humperdinck (30) meets Richard Strauss (20) at a rehearsal for Strauss’ Symphony in f minor.
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January 24, 1885: On the advice of Richard Strauss (20), Engelbert Humperdinck (30) meets the wealthy industrialist Alfred Krupp. Krupp hires him as a pianist at the Villa Hügel where he will stay until 1 August.
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March 4, 1885: Concerto for horn and orchestra no.1 op.11 by Richard Strauss (20) is performed for the first time, in Meiningen.
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June 18, 1885: Duke Georg II confirms the appointment of Richard Strauss (21) as assistant court conductor in Saxe-Meiningen.
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October 1, 1885: Richard Strauss (21) takes up the position of assistant court conductor at Meiningen under perhaps the greatest living conductor, Hans von Bülow.
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October 18, 1885: Richard Strauss (21) makes his debut as solo pianist, in Meiningen, playing the Mozart (†93) Concerto K.491. He also conducts his own f minor symphony. In the audience is Johannes Brahms (52) who is visiting the city for the premiere of his own Fourth Symphony. He offers the young musician (what Strauss calls) a memorable piece of advice on composing.
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October 25, 1885: Symphony no.4 of Johannes Brahms (52) is performed for the first time, in Meiningen conducted by the composer. Upon hearing the symphony, Richard Strauss (21) calls it a “giant work, great in concept and invention, masterful in its form, and yet from A-Z genuine Brahms, in a word, an enrichment of our art.”
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November 1, 1885: Richard Strauss (21), with little training or experience, becomes court conductor in Meiningen after the resignation of Hans von Bülow.
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December 6, 1885: Richard Strauss (21) conducts his first performance with the Meiningener Hofkepelle as successor to Hans von Bülow.
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December 8, 1885: Piano Quartet op.13 by Richard Strauss (21) is performed for the first time, in Weimar, the composer at the keyboard.
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January 31, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) resigns as conductor of the Meiningener Hofkapelle, effective at the end of April.
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March 24, 1886: Duke Georg II of Saxe-Meiningen writes to his departing conductor Richard Strauss (21) thanking him for the dedication of his Piano Quartet and awarding him the Cross of Merit for Art and Learning.
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April 3, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) is informed that King Ludwig II of Bavaria has appointed him third conductor at the Munich Court Opera.
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April 10, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) departs Meiningen to travel in Italy before taking up his new post in Munich on 1 August.
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May 24, 1886: Richard Strauss (21) arrives in Munich to take up his post at the Munich Court Opera. In the two months before his contract goes into effect, he will compose Aus Italien, inspired by the five weeks he just spent in Italy.
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August 1, 1886: Richard Strauss (22) enters into a three year contract as third conductor at the Munich Court Opera.
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October 1, 1886: Richard Strauss (22) makes his opera conducting debut, in Munich with a production of Jean de Paris by Adrien Boieldieu (†51).
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March 2, 1887: Aus Italien, a symphonic fantasy by Richard Strauss (22), is performed for the first time, in Munich conducted by the composer. The first three movements are applauded but after the fourth, numerous hisses are heard. He will later remember, “I felt enormous pride: the first work which aroused the opposition of the multitude; it cannot be insignificant.”
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March 8, 1887: Wandrers Sturmlied op.14 for chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (22) to words of Goethe is performed for the first time, in Cologne conducted by the composer.
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October 13, 1887: Richard Strauss (23) conducts his Symphony no.2 in Leipzig. While in town, he makes the acquaintance of the second conductor at the Stadttheater, Gustav Mahler (27). Mahler will later say that he and Strauss were like “two miners who dig a shaft from opposite sides and finally meet underground.”
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October 23, 1887: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play Romeo und Julia by Richard Strauss (23) is performed for the first time, in the Munich Hoftheater.
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October 3, 1888: Violin Sonata op.18 by Richard Strauss (24) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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February 1, 1889: The Second Festmarsch in C by Richard Strauss (24) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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March 7, 1889: Hans Bronsart, intendent in Weimar, concludes secret negotiations with Richard Strauss (24) to bring Strauss to the conducting position in Weimar.
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March 30, 1889: A contract is agreed to to make Richard Strauss (24) Kapellmeister in Weimar. Officially he begins 1 August but is given leave to be part of the Bayreuth Festival.
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July 31, 1889: Richard Strauss (25) travels from Munich to Bayreuth to assist in the festival.
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September 8, 1889: Richard Strauss (25) enters duties as conductor at Weimar. The position was secured for him by the music director, Edward Lassen, successor to Franz Liszt (†3).
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September 22, 1889: Richard Strauss (25) conducts his first performance at the Weimar Hoftheater.  He will conduct 201 operatic performances there over the next five years.
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October 28, 1889: Richard Strauss (25) conducts his first performance with the Weimar Hofkapelle.
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November 11, 1889: Don Juan, a symphonic poem by Richard Strauss (25), is performed for the first time, in Weimar, conducted by the composer. More than any other, this work establishes his fame.
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November 26, 1889: In a letter to Cosima Wagner, Richard Strauss (25) writes about the Symphonie fantastique, “Next to such a gigantic work, how wretched appears Ein Deutsches Requiem by the musically abstinent temperance society member Brahms (56).”
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December 14, 1889: Scherzquartett for male chorus by Richard Strauss (25) is performed for the first time, in Weimar.
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March 4, 1890: Richard Strauss’ (25) Concerto for violin and orchestra is performed with orchestra for the first time, in Cologne. See 5 December 1882.
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June 20, 1890: After a year in Weimar, Richard Strauss (26) is promoted to the rank of Hofkapellmeister by Grand Duke Carl Alexander of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.
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June 21, 1890: Two works by Richard Strauss (26) are performed for the first time, in the Eisenach Stadttheater conducted by the composer: Burleske for piano and orchestra, and the tone poem Tod und Verklärung. The tone poem is a triumph.
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October 13, 1890: Macbeth, a symphonic poem by Richard Strauss (26), is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Hofkapelle conducted by the composer.
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May 7, 1891: A fanfare for Wilhelm Iffland’s play Der Jäger by Richard Strauss (26) is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Court Theatre.
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May 11, 1891: The 100th performance of Lohengrin in Weimar is conducted by Richard Strauss (26), almost 41 years after its premiere by Franz Liszt (†4). New sets and costumes are funded by Grand Duke Carl Alexander personally.
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January 17, 1892: Richard Strauss (27) conducts Tristan und Isolde for the first time, in Weimar.
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October 8, 1892: Music for tableaux vivants by Richard Strauss (28) is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Hofkapelle, conducted by the composer. The work was composed for the golden anniversary of the Grand Duke and Duchess of Weimar. He will later publish part of this as Kampf und Sieg.
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November 4, 1892: Richard Strauss (28) departs Germany to spend the winter in Greece and Egypt.
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November 12, 1892: On his trip to Greece, Richard Strauss (28) visits Olympia. “The free sense of beauty, the religion of nature, pure visual perception--Olympia! Philosophical, world-transcending sublimity, profoundest inwardness--Bayreuth!”
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November 16, 1892: Richard Strauss (28) arrives in Athens and remains for ten days, sending lengthy descriptions of his impressions to his family and friends.
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July 15, 1893: Richard Strauss (29) arrives in Munich after spending nine months in Greece, Egypt, and Sicily.
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December 23, 1893: Hänsel und Gretel, a Märchenoper by Engelbert Humperdinck (39) to words of A. Wette, H. Wette, and the composer after Grimm, is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Court Theatre, conducted by Richard Strauss (29). It is an instant success.
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January 20, 1894: Richard Strauss (29) visits his mentor Hans von Bülow for the last time, in Hamburg. Already quite ill, von Bülow is about to travel to Cairo.
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March 20, 1894: Richard Strauss (29) concludes a contract to conduct at the Munich opera beginning 1 October.
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March 22, 1894: Richard Strauss (29) asks the parents of Pauline de Ahna for her hand. They agree and the two are engaged. This will remain secret until May.
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April 4, 1894: The Münchener Neueste Nachrichten announces that the Bavarian regent Prince Luitpold has approved of the engagement of Richard Strauss (29) by the Munich Opera.
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April 13, 1894: Grand Duke Carl Alexander of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach grants leave to Richard Strauss (29) to resign his position.
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May 9, 1894: At the dress rehearsal of his opera Guntram, Richard Strauss (29) criticizes all the singers except the lead soprano Pauline de Ahna. She becomes incensed at this, demands equal criticism and throws her score at him from the stage. The composer follows her to her dressing room where are heard loud noises from within. Several musicians who come to lend him support, enter the room finding the pair smiling. Strauss announces that they are engaged.
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May 10, 1894: Guntram, an opera by Richard Strauss (29) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Weimar Hoftheater conducted by the composer. The critical response is tepid.
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September 10, 1894: Richard Strauss (30) marries Pauline de Ahna, an opera singer and his voice student, the daughter of a general, in Schlosskapelle St. Veit in Marquartstein, Bavaria near Salzburg, where her family has a summer home. As a wedding present, he dedicates his songs op.27 to her.
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October 6, 1894: Richard Strauss (30) and his new wife Pauline de Anha return from their Italian honeymoon to their new home in Munich.  He enters into duties as assistant conductor of the Munich Hofoper.
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October 7, 1894: Richard Strauss (30) conducts his first performance with the Munich Hofoper.
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October 30, 1894: Richard Strauss (30) is appointed conductor of the Musical Academy concerts in Munich.
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November 16, 1894: Richard Strauss (30) conducts his first concert as director of the Munich Hofkapelle.
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November 5, 1895: Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche, a tone poem by Richard Strauss (31) is performed for the first time, in Cologne. It is a hit with critics and the public.
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January 12, 1896: Anton Bruckner (71) attends a performance of his music for the last time, in Vienna. He is carried into the hall to hear his own Te Deum, Das Liebesmahl der Apostel by Richard Wagner (†12) and Richard Strauss’ (31) Till Eulenspiegel.
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October 1, 1896: Richard Strauss (32) is promoted to Hofkapellmeister in Munich.
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November 27, 1896: Also sprach Zarathustra, a tone poem by Richard Strauss (32), is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main the composer conducting. “Zarathustra is glorious--by far the most important of all my pieces, the most perfect in form, the richest in content and the most individual in character...” Critical and popular response is highly positive.
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December 6, 1896: Gesang der Apollopriesterin for voice and orchestra by Richard Strauss (32) to words of von Bodmann, is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de la Monnaie, Brussels.
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March 24, 1897: Enoch Arden, a melodrama for reciter and piano by Richard Strauss (32) to words of Tennyson translated by Strodtmann, is performed for the first time, in Munich the composer at the piano.
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June 1, 1897: Licht, Du ewiglich eines, a hymn for chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (32), is performed for the first time, in Munich conducted by the composer. The work helps to open an art exhibit.
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August 14, 1897: Richard Strauss (33) meets Sergey Diaghilev for the first time, at the Bayerischer Hof hotel in Munich.
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September 23, 1897: Richard Strauss (33) receives an invitation from Edouard Colonne to conduct in Paris for the first time.
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December 7, 1897: Richard Strauss (33) conducts for the first time before a British audience, in Queen’s Hall, music of Wagner (†14), Mozart (†106) and himself. Among the trombonists is a Royal College of Music student named Gustav Holst (23).
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March 8, 1898: Don Quixote, a tone poem for cello and orchestra by Richard Strauss (33), is performed for the first time, in Cologne. The reaction of the audience is mixed. Critics think it too experimental.
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March 9, 1898: Hymne op.34/2 for chorus by Richard Strauss (33) to words of Rückert is performed in an open rehearsal in Cologne. See 18 April 1898.
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April 9, 1898: Richard Strauss (33) concludes a one-year contract with the Berlin opera to begin 1 November.  It will be signed on 15 April.
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April 15, 1898: Richard Strauss (33) signs a contract to conduct the Berlin Court Opera.
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April 18, 1898: Hymne op.34/2 for chorus by Richard Strauss (33) to words of Rückert is performed for the first time, in Cologne. See 9 March 1898.
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May 2, 1898: Der Abend op.34/1 for chorus by Richard Strauss (33) to words of Schiller is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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July 14, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) addresses a letter to 160 composers advocating a change in the Imperial German copyright laws in order to better protect composers. He will receive 119 positive responses.
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September 30, 1898: As a result of the letter of Richard Strauss (34) last 14 July, a conference takes place in Leipzig which creates the Genossenschaft deutscher Tonsetzter.
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October 18, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) conducts Fidelio, his last production as chief conductor of the Munich Opera. He is moving to Berlin.
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November 1, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) enters duties as conductor of the Berlin Hofoper (first Kapellmeister to the Court of Prussia).
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November 5, 1898: Richard Strauss (34) conducts for the first time at the Berlin Court Opera. It is Wagner’s (†15) Tristan und Isolde.
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January 14, 1899: Briséïs, ou Les amants de Corinthe, an unfinished drame lyrique by Emmanuel Chabrier (†4) to words of Mendès and Mikhaël after Goethe, is staged for the first time, in the Royal Opera House, Berlin, conducted by Richard Strauss (34). See 31 January 1897.
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March 3, 1899: Ein Heldenleben, a tone poem by Richard Strauss (34), is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main, the composer conducting.
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March 13, 1899: Richard Strauss (34) meets Kaiser Wilhelm II for the first time. The Kaiser tells him that he does not care for modern music and prefers Der Freischütz. Strauss tells the monarch that he agrees with him.
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March 23, 1899: In the Berlin suburb of Pankow, Richard Strauss (34) meets Hugo von Hofmmansthal for the first time at the home of Richard Dehmel.
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December 8, 1899: Zwei Männerchöre by Richard Strauss (35) to folk poems are performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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March 19, 1900: Richard Strauss (35) and Hans Pfitzner (30) begin their rivalry at a joint concert in Berlin.
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December 3, 1900: Two songs op.44 by Richard Strauss (36) for voice and orchestra are performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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November 21, 1901: Feuersnot, an opera by Richard Strauss (37) to words of von Wolzogen, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Court Opera, under the direction of the composer. It is a success.
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January 29, 1902: Gustav Mahler (41) gives the first Vienna performance of Feuersnot by Richard Strauss (37).  It took a while to get through the Austrian censors.
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February 12, 1902: After witnessing the Budapest premiere of Also sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss (37), Béla Bartók (20) is so inspired that he begins to devote more and more time to composing.
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April 15, 1902: Arnold Schoenberg (27) receives the following postcard message at his Berlin address: “Dear Sir, you can see me every day from three till four at home. Yours sincerely, Richard Strauss.”(37)
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May 21, 1902: One day after the German premiere of The Dream of Gerontius in Düsseldorf, Edward Elgar (44) attends a dinner at which Richard Strauss (37) gives a speech. Strauss is disparaging of English music in general but ends by proposing, “to the welfare and success of the first English progressivist, Meister Edward Elgar, and of the young progressivist school of English composers.”
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June 9, 1902: The first complete performance of the Symphony no.3 by Gustav Mahler (42) is conducted by the composer at Krefeld, Germany. It is an enormous success. The audience, which includes Richard Strauss (37) and Engelbert Humperdinck (47), applauds for 15 minutes. The press is positive, but not without reservation. See 9 November 1896 and 9 March 1897.
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December 2, 1902: At the request of the faculty, Béla Bartók (21) plays his transcription of Richard Strauss’ (38) Ein Heldenleben at the Budapest Academy of Music.
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January 14, 1903: Richard Strauss (38), Engelbert Humperdinck (48), and several other composers form the Association of German Composers in an attempt to apply the German Copyright law which went into effect last year.  The pact will become effective on 1 July.  See 1 July 1903.
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January 20, 1903: Béla Bartók (21) plays his transcription of Richard Strauss’ (38) Ein Heldenleben at the Tonkünstlerverein, Vienna. The transcription and performance find favorable reactions in the press.
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April 7, 1903: Das Thal op.51/1 for baritone and orchestra by Richard Strauss (38) to words of Uhland is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 5, 1903: Richard Strauss’ (38) song for solo voice and orchestra Hymnus op.33/3 to anonymous words, is performed for the first time.
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July 1, 1903: Through the efforts of Richard Strauss (39), the Genossenschaft Deutscher Tonsetzer is founded. Its stated goals are to protect and assist its members, especially in the realm of music copyrights.  See 14 January 1903.
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August 8, 1903: Heidelberg University announces that it has awarded Richard Strauss (39) an honorary Ph.D.
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October 26, 1903: Taillefer op.52 for chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (39) to words of Uhland, is performed for the first time, under the composer’s direction in Heidelberg. Strauss wrote the work for the occasion of his receipt of an honorary Ph.D. from Heidelberg University.
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February 1, 1904: Richard Strauss (39) and his wife depart Berlin for a tour of the United States.
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February 24, 1904: Richard Strauss (39) and his wife arrive in New York for an American tour.
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February 27, 1904: Richard Strauss (39) gives his first concert in the United States, conducting Ein Heldenleben in Carnegie Hall, New York. He will also visit Boston and Philadelphia.
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March 4, 1904: Richard Strauss (39) conducts Tod und Verklärung with the Philadelphia Orchestra in Philadelphia.
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March 11, 1904: Richard Strauss (39) conducts his own music in the first of two concerts in Pittsburgh with the Pittsburgh Symphony. It will be repeated tomorrow.
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March 21, 1904: On his first visit to the United States, Richard Strauss (39) conducts the premiere performance of his Symphonia Domestica in Carnegie Hall, New York. The audience calls him to the stage eight times. Critics are mixed. See 16 April 1904.
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April 2, 1904: Richard Strauss (39) conducts an all-Strauss evening in Chicago.
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April 16, 1904: The premiere of Richard Strauss’ (39) Symphonia domestica on 12 March was so successful that an entire floor of Wannamaker’s department store in New York has been cleared for a repeat performance. It will be performed again in the same place on 18 April.
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April 26, 1904: On his tour of the United States, Richard Strauss (39) and his wife are received by President and Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt in Washington.
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April 14, 1905: Engelbert Humperdinck’s (50) comic opera Die Heirat wider Willen, to words of H. Humperdinck (wife of the composer) and the composer after Dumas, is performed for the first time, at the Royal Opera House, Berlin, conducted by Richard Strauss (40).
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September 22, 1905: Gustav Mahler (45) writes to Richard Strauss (41) informing him that the Austrian censor has refused to allow the performance of Salome on “religious and moral grounds.” Mahler intended to stage the premiere at the Hofoper.
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October 19, 1905: Richard Strauss (41) conducts the premiere of the revised version of Jean Sibelius’ (39) Violin Concerto, in Berlin.
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October 31, 1905: Vienna Hofoper conductor Gustav Mahler (45) receives a report from Austrian court censor Emil Jettel von Ettenach declaring that Richard Strauss’ (41) opera Salome is unfit for the Imperial and Royal stage. It seems the work contains “…the depiction of events that belong in the realm of sexual pathology…” (Fischer, 476)
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December 9, 1905: Salome op.54, a Musikdrama by Richard Strauss (41) to words of Oscar Wilde (tr. Lachmann), is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Court Opera. The audience, including Sergey Rakhmaninov (32) and Arturo Toscanini, awards 40 curtain calls. Although one critic called it the “ultimate in salacious and blasphemous art”, the opera is a great success.
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February 6, 1906: Bardengesang op.55 for male chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (41) to words of Klopstock, is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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February 22, 1906: Richard Strauss (41) meets Hugo von Hofmannsthal in Berlin. They have met before, but this is the first conversation of any length or significance. Hofmannsthal allows Strauss to use his play Elektra any way he likes.
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March 5, 1906: Der Einsame op.51/2, a song by Richard Strauss (41) to words of Heine, is performed for the first time, in Leipzig. The piano part is performed by the composer.
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March 25, 1906: Claude Debussy (43) and Richard Strauss (41) meet for the first and only time, at the home of Jacques Durand. Strauss has asked for the meeting to discuss organizations to distribute royalties. Since Debussy knows little of the subject, Strauss is probably disappointed.
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May 16, 1906: Banned in Vienna, the Austrian premiere of Richard Strauss' (41) Salome takes place in Graz.  Gustav (45) and Alma Mahler, Arnold Schoenberg (31), and Alban Berg (21) are in the audience, as is a 17-year-old aspiring artist named Adolf Hitler.
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January 20, 1907: After viewing the dress rehearsal for the Metropolitan Opera’s premiere production of Richard Strauss’ (42) Salome, Mrs. Herbert Tatterlee goes in anger to her father, JP Morgan, a member of the board of the opera. See 23 January 1907.
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January 22, 1907: The American premiere of Salome by Richard Strauss (42) takes place at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York. The audience, which includes Giacomo Puccini (48), is calm until the Dance of the Seven Veils. After a glowing review, the New York Times will report, “It was the dance that women turn away from, and many of the women in the Metropolitan Opera House last night turned away from it. Very few men in the audience seemed comfortable. They twisted in their chairs, and before it was over there were numbers of them who decided to go to the corridors and smoke.” As Salome sings to the head, some audience members leave, while most stand to get a better view.
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January 23, 1907: The day after the American premiere of Richard Strauss' (42) Salome at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, an emergency meeting of the house's board takes place, called by JP Morgan. After the meeting, the three further (already sold out) performances of the opera are cancelled. See 20 January 1907.
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February 6, 1907: In Vienna, Gustav Mahler (46) writes to Richard Strauss (42), “I heard the new Schoenberg (32) Quartet yesterday and found it so profound and impressive that I cannot but most emphatically recommend it for the Dresden Festival.” (Wright & Gillmor, 17)
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March 3, 1907: Two Military Marches op.57 and a Königsmarsch, both for orchestra by Richard Strauss (42), are performed for the first time, in Berlin, conducted by the composer.
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May 22, 1907: Maurice Ravel (32) and Richard Strauss (42) are invited to dinner at the Paris apartment of Jean Marnold, along with Romain Rolland.  They all go off to see Pelléas et Melisande at the Opéra-Comique.  Strauss is not impressed.  After Act I he asks, "Is it like this all the time?" (Nichols, Ravel, 93)
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June 17, 1907: The first issue of the weekly periodical Morgen is dated today. One of the editors is Richard Strauss (43).
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January 25, 1909: Elektra op.58, an opera by Richard Strauss (44) to words of Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Court Opera. The audience is confused, the press hostile.
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April 2, 1909: A scheduled performance of Richard Strauss’ (44) opera Salome in Boston is banned by Mayor Hibbard.
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September 2, 1909: Richard Strauss (45) returns the score of Arnold Schoenberg’s (34) Five Orchestral Pieces to the composer without hope of performance, saying “...your pieces are such daring experiments in content and sound that...I dare not introduce them to the more than conservative Berlin public.”
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June 19, 1910: Richard Strauss (46) conducts the Vienna Opera for the first time, in a production of his own Elektra.
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September 7, 1910: The Dresden Court Opera notifies Richard Strauss (46) that it will not produce Der Rosenkavalier if he continues to insist that they also produce Salome and Elektra.
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September 12, 1910: Symphony no.8 “of a thousand” for three sopranos, two altos, tenor, baritone, bass, boys chorus, mixed chorus, and orchestra by Gustav Mahler (50) to the medieval hymn Veni Creator Spiritus and words of Goethe, is performed for the first time, at the Neue Musik Festhalle, Munich, conducted by the composer. The performers include eight soloists, 170 in the orchestra (plus organ) and 850 singers (both children and adult). It is the greatest success of Mahler’s life. Among the glittering audience are Camille Saint-Saëns (74), Alphons Diepenbrock (48), Richard Strauss (46), Paul Dukas (44), Max Reger (37), Alfredo Casella (27), Anton Webern (26), Auguste Rodin, Lilli Lehmann, Siegried Wagern, Willem Mengelberg, Bruno Walter, Leopold Stokowski, and Thomas Mann. Mann will send Mahler a copy of his new book Königliche Hoheit. “It is certainly a very poor return for what I received—a mere feather’s weight in the hand of the man who, as I believe, expresses the art of our time in its profoundest and most sacred form.” It is the last time Mahler and Strauss meet.
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November 30, 1910: The New York Times reports that a production of Richard Strauss’ (46) Salome starring Mary Garden, scheduled for 2 December, has been cancelled. The police asked that “offensive” parts of the opera be toned down. The soprano refused and the production was cancelled.
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December 15, 1910: The symphonic poem Bourgogne by Edgard Varèse (26) is performed for the first time, in Bluthner Hall, Berlin. The performance was made possible through the intervention of Richard Strauss (46). The critics are scathing. Varèse will destroy this manuscript about 1962.
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January 26, 1911: Der Rosenkavalier op.59, a Komödie für Musik by Richard Strauss (46) to words of Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Court Opera. The production is a great success. This year alone, there will be 50 performances in Dresden and 37 in Vienna. Special trains are run to handle the number of people desirous of seeing the opera.
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January 17, 1912: Jean Sibelius (46) is offered the position of Professor of Composition at the Akademie für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Vienna. He is their third choice after Richard Strauss (47) and Max Reger (38). Sibelius will decline.
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February 15, 1912: After a concert in Berlin in which Richard Strauss (47) conducts the Berlin Philharmonic, Arnold Schoenberg (37) introduces him to Anton von Webern (28). It is not known what transpires, but Strauss and Webern will never have dealings nor speak to one another again.
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October 25, 1912: Ariadne auf Naxos op.60 by Richard Strauss (48) to words of Hofmannsthal is performed for the first time, in the Stuttgart Court Theatre, the composer conducting. The production is a disaster. The first part of the work is Molière’s Le bourgeois gentilhomme with incidental music by Strauss. The second part is a one-act opera by Strauss. See 4 October 1916.
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November 21, 1912: The Berlin premiere of The Firebird by Igor Stravinsky (30) takes place and is very successful.  Richard Strauss (48) greets the composer afterwards and congratulates him.
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October 19, 1913: A Festliche Praeludium by Richard Strauss (49) is performed for the first time, at the inauguration of the Konzert-Haus, Vienna.
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December 2, 1913: Deutsche Motette op.62 for chorus by Richard Strauss (49), to words of Rückert, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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May 14, 1914: Richard Strauss’ (49) ballet Josephs-Legende op.63, to a story by Kessler and Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, by the Ballets Russes at the Paris Opéra, the composer conducting.
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June 14, 1914: Richard Strauss (50) receives the order of Chevalier of the French Legion of Honor.
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August 1, 1914: All German investments in London are sequestered by the Bank of England, including £50,000 belonging to Richard Strauss (50).
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August 20, 1914: Upon completing the draft of Act I of Die Frau ohne Schatten, Richard Strauss (50) writes on the manuscript: “Completed 20 August 1914, on the day of the victory of Saarburg. Hail to our excellent and courageous troops, hail to our German fatherland!”
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May 7, 1915: At the invitation of Isabella Stewart Gardner, Harvard student Roger Sessions (18) plays some Richard Strauss (50) on the piano at a musical evening in her Renaissance palazzo in Boston. Also in attendance are two of Sessions’ friends, EE Cummings and Chandler R. Post.
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October 28, 1915: Eine Alpensinfonie by Richard Strauss (51) is performed for the first time, in Berlin, the composer conducting. The critics don’t like it.
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October 4, 1916: A revised version of Ariadne auf Naxos, an opera by Richard Strauss (52) to words of Hoffmannsthal, is performed for the first time, at the Vienna Court Opera. This one is received cautiously at first, but will soon replace the original. See 25 October 1912.
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December 5, 1916: In six sessions this month beginning today, Richard Strauss (52) makes his first recordings, for Deutsche Grammophon in Berlin.  He conducts five of his orchestral works.
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April 9, 1918: A second production of Molière’s Le bourgeois gentilhomme with incidental music by Richard Strauss (53) is performed for the first time, in the Deutsches Theater, Berlin. Strauss has composed some new music for this production. Unfortunately, it is a failure.
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October 11, 1918: Richard Strauss (54) signs a contract as joint director of the Vienna Hofoper starting at the beginning of the 1919-1920 season.
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November 7, 1918: Richard Strauss (54) conducts Salome in Berlin. It is the last production at the Berlin Court Opera. In two days, the German court will cease to exist.
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November 11, 1918: Richard Strauss (54) is named interim artistic advisor of the Berlin Opera.
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November 25, 1918: Richard Strauss (54) resigns as interim artistic advisor to the Berlin Opera. He is planning a move to Vienna.
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March 1, 1919: Richard Strauss (54) is appointed director of the State Opera of the Austrian Republic (formerly the Vienna Court Opera). Immediately the entire staff, with a few notable exceptions, demand his withdrawal, charging that his salary is too high for “an impoverished country like the new Austria.”
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March 6, 1919: The Alexanderplatz, center of the communist insurrection in Berlin, is secured by government troops. Richard Strauss (54) reports to his wife, “There was a lot of shooting today, the government troops won at Alexanderplatz, and did a thorough clear-out of the Spartacists.”
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May 30, 1919: Five of the Sechs Lieder op.68 by Richard Strauss (54) to words of Brentano, are performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 27, 1919: Three Lieder op.67/2,4,6 by Richard Strauss (55) to words of Goethe, are performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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October 10, 1919: Die Frau ohne Schatten op.65, an opera by Richard Strauss (55) to words of Hoffmannsthal, is performed for the first time, at the Vienna Staatsoper. It is generally well received, but most don’t understand it.
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December 1, 1919: Richard Strauss (55) and Franz Schalk enter upon duties as co-directors of the State Opera of the Austrian Republic.  This evening, Strauss conducts the last performance of his 21-year tenure with the Berlin Opera.  It is Salomé.
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December 8, 1919: Richard Strauss (55) gives his first performance with the Vienna Staatsoper.
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August 12, 1920: Richard Strauss (56) sails from Genoa for an extended tour of South America.
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September 29, 1920: Lied der Frauen op.68/6 for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (56) to words of Brentano, is performed for the first time, in Dresden. See 30 May 1919.
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October 19, 1921: Richard Strauss (57) sails for the United States aboard the Adriatic. He is travelling with his son and the singer Elisabeth Schumann.
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November 4, 1921: Three Hymns op.71 by Richard Strauss (57) to words of Hölderlin are performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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January 4, 1922: After two months in the United States, Richard Strauss (57) sails for England where he will conduct the Hallé Orchestra in Manchester.
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February 17, 1923: Tanzsuite aus Klavierstücken von François Couperin for orchestra by Richard Strauss (58) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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January 15, 1924: The Hochzeitspräludium by Richard Strauss (59) for two harmoniums is performed for the first time, in Vienna at the wedding of his son Franz to Alice Grab.
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March 4, 1924: Fanfare for the Vienna Philharmonic for brass and timpani by Richard Strauss (59) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 29, 1924: From a jury that includes Richard Strauss (59), Anton Webern (40) is unanimously awarded the Prize of the City of Vienna.
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May 9, 1924: Schlagobers op.70, a ballet by Richard Strauss (59) to his own scenario, is performed for the first time, at the Vienna Staatsoper, the composer conducting, to begin the celebrations surrounding his 60th birthday. It is not a success.
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September 24, 1924: From the Vienna Rathaus Tower is heard for the first time Fanfare zur Eröffnung der Musikwoche der Stadt Wien im September 1924, for brass and timpani, by Richard Strauss (60).
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November 4, 1924: Intermezzo op.72, an opera by Richard Strauss (60) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Staatsoper.
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October 16, 1925: Parergon zur Sinfonia Domestica op.73 for piano left hand and orchestra by Richard Strauss (61) is performed for the first time, in Dresden. The work is commissioned by, dedicated to, and performed by Paul Wittgenstein.
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January 10, 1926: A new Military March and an arrangement of the opera music for the film Der Rosenkavalier by Richard Strauss (61) are performed for the first time, in the Dresden Opera House, conducted by the composer. Unfortunately, the film is a flop.
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November 1, 1926: Krämerspiegel, a pastiche for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (62) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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January 16, 1928: Panathenäenzug for piano-left hand and orchestra by Richard Strauss (63) is performed for the first time, in Berlin by Paul Wittgenstein.
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June 6, 1928: Die ägyptische Helena, an opera by Richard Strauss (63) to words of Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, in the Dresden Staatsoper. Performed during a week devoted to Strauss’ music, it is a rousing success with the public but the press is unimpressed.
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July 21, 1928: To commemorate the centennial of Schubert’s death Die Tageszeiten for male chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (64), to words of Eichendorff, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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June 5, 1929: Gesänge des Orients op.77 for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (64) to words translated by Bethge, is performed for the first time, in Berlin the composer at the keyboard.
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July 15, 1929: Five days after sending the revisions to the libretto of Act I of Arabella to Richard Strauss (65) and two days after his son’s suicide, Hugo von Hofmannsthal dies of a stroke while preparing to attend his son’s funeral.
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November 20, 1929: Richard Strauss (65) meets the writer Stefan Zweig for the first time, at the Hotel Vier Jahreszeiten in Munich. They begin discussion on a new project, Die schweigsame Frau.
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January 10, 1930: Austria, for male chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (65) to words of Wildgans, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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March 20, 1933: A concert by the Berlin Philharmonic, scheduled to be conducted by Bruno Walter, is instead conducted by Richard Strauss (68).  Strauss stepped in when Walter, who is Jewish, was removed by the Ministry of Propaganda.  Strauss donated his fee to the orchestra.
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July 1, 1933: Arabella, a lyrische Komödie by Richard Strauss (69) to words of Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Staatsoper. Strauss tried to withdraw the work because Fritz Busch, who was scheduled to conduct the premiere, was removed from his post in Dresden for criticism of the Nazis. Strauss, however, was held to his contract and the work goes on as scheduled. “The work ended with a storm of approval such as had seldom been demonstrated in the history of operatic first performance,” Strauss will remember.
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November 10, 1933: The Ministerial Council of the German Department of Propaganda sends a telegram to Richard Strauss (69) asking if he would accept the position of president of the Reichsmusikkammer and participate in its opening ceremonies.
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November 15, 1933: The Reichskulturkammer is inaugurated with ceremonies in Berlin. Richard Strauss (70), the President of the Reichsmusikkammer, a state music bureau within the Reichskulturkammer, conducts his Festliches Präludium for the event.
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February 13, 1934: Richard Strauss (69) presides over the first meeting of the Reichsmusikkammer. At the conclusion, three Sieg Heils are proclaimed and Hitler is called the “champion and creator of the work of national culture.”
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June 11, 1934: On the occasion of his 70th birthday, Richard Strauss receives presents from Chancellor Adolf Hitler and Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels. The gifts that they bestow on the composer of Salome and Der Rosenkavalier are autographed photographs of themselves.
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November 16, 1934: The Reichsmusikkammer equates Paul Hindemith (38) with Richard Strauss (70) and Hans Pfitzner (65) as “the only true composers and articles of export.” Hindemith has threatened to emigrate if attacks on him are not stopped.
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December 6, 1934: Speaking in the Berlin Sportpalast, Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels denounces Paul Hindemith (39) (although not by name): “Purely German his blood may be, but this only provides dramatic confirmation of how deeply the Jewish intellectual infection has eaten into the body of our own people.” He also denounces the “moral decay” of atonal composers. Following the speech, a telegram to Goebbels is read congratulating him on “weeding out undesirable elements,” signed by Reichsmusikkammer President Richard Strauss (70). Strauss will deny that he sent the telegram, but there was a telegram sent to Goebbels, drafted by Strauss’ son Franz and approved by Strauss, congratulating Goebbels for going after atonality.
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February 23, 1935: Stefan Zweig, the librettist of Die schweigsame Frau, writes to Richard Strauss (70) from Vienna, declining Strauss’ request for a collaboration on another libretto. Zweig, who is Jewish, sees political consequences ahead.
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February 26, 1935: At a meeting of the leadership council of the Reichsmusikkammer, a solution to the “Hindemith problem” is devised. Richard Strauss (70) will ask Joseph Goebbels to reinstate Paul Hindemith (39) to his position at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik and withdraw a ban on his works, as long as the number of performances is kept low so as not to seem like an endorsement.
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June 2, 1935: Reichsmusikkammer President Richard Strauss (70) meets his librettist Stefan Zweig in Bregenz, just over the Austrian border. Zweig is Jewish and is afraid to enter Germany.
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June 17, 1935: In Dresden, Richard Strauss (71) writes a letter to his Jewish librettist Stefan Zweig in Zürich, in which he tells how he does not consider himself a German or an Aryan composer. “The people exist for me only at the moment they become audience. Whether they are Chinese, Bavarians, New Zealanders, or Berliners leaves me cold. What matters is that they pay the full price of admission.” The letter is intercepted by the Gestapo and copies are sent to Hitler and Goebbels.
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June 24, 1935: Die schweigsame Frau, a komische opera by Richard Strauss (71) to words of Zweig after Jonson, is performed for the first time, in the Dresden Staatsoper. It is a success with the audience, but neither Hitler nor Goebbels, nor any high ranking party or government official attends. The librettist is Jewish.
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July 1, 1935: The Gestapo in Dresden forward Richard Strauss’ (71) letter of 17 June to Adolf Hitler in Berlin.
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July 6, 1935: In Berchtesgaden, on the orders of Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels, two officials demand the resignation of Richard Strauss (71) as President of the Reichsmusikkammer “on the grounds of ill-health.” Strauss immediately complies.
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July 8, 1935: A radio broadcast of Richard Strauss’ (71) opera Die schweigsame Frau, with words by the Jewish librettist, Stephan Zweig, is allowed to go ahead in Dresden. However, the Nazis jam the broadcast and it can be heard only in Saxony.
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July 13, 1935: On the day that his resignation as President of the Reichsmusikkammer is announced, Richard Strauss (71) writes to Adolf Hitler. He tries to explain his letter of 17 June to Stefan Zweig declaring, “My whole life belongs to German music and to a tireless effort to elevate German culture.”
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April 5, 1936: Three Male Choruses by Richard Strauss (71) to words of Rückert are performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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August 1, 1936: The Games of the Eleventh Olympiad of the Modern Era open in Berlin. Olympic Hymn for chorus and orchestra by Richard Strauss (72) to words of Lubahn is performed for the first time, at the opening ceremonies in Olympic Stadium along with Olympische Festmusik for orchestra by Werner Egk (35).
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November 5, 1936: Richard Strauss (72) conducts the Royal Philharmonic in London. During the intermission he receives the RPS Gold Medal.
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July 24, 1938: Friedenstag, an opera by Richard Strauss (74) to words of Gregor, is performed for the first time, at the Munich Staatsoper.
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October 15, 1938: Daphne, an opera by Richard Strauss (74) to words of Gregor, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Staatsoper. The response is tepid despite the approval of Joseph Goebbels.
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November 9, 1938: Nazis in Garmisch plan to arrest Alice Strauss, daughter-in-law of Richard Strauss (74), who is Jewish, but she has been hidden by a family friend in Düsseldorf. Strauss’ grandsons, Richard and Christian are beaten and taken to the town square in Garmisch where they are required to spit on Jews who have been arrested.
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April 1, 1939: Durch Einsamkeiten for male chorus by Richard Strauss (74) to words of Wildgans is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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May 24, 1939: München, an “occasional waltz” for orchestra by Richard Strauss (74), is performed for the first time, in Munich. The waltz is to accompany a film about the city’s cultural heritage but it has been banned by Hitler because they plan new building developments in Munich. Today, the mayor arranges a private showing of the film. See 14 March 1940.
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June 11, 1939: On the occasion of the 75th birthday of Richard Strauss, the composer is able to have a two-hour conversation with Propaganda Minister Goebbels in Vienna. Goebbels tells Strauss that he will ask Hitler for protection for his daughter-in-law (a Jew) and grandsons. The protection is never granted.
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March 14, 1940: München, an “occasional waltz” for orchestra by Richard Strauss (75), is performed publicly for the first time, in Munich. The waltz was written to accompany a film about the city’s cultural heritage. See 24 May 1939.
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December 14, 1940: Festmusik zur Feier des 2600 jährigen Bestehens des Kaiserreichs Japan for orchestra by Richard Strauss (76), is performed for the first time, in the Kabukiza Theatre, Tokyo.
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April 5, 1941: Verklungene Feste, a ballet by Richard Strauss (76) to a choreography by Pia and Pino Mlaker, is performed for the first time, in the Bayerische Staatsoper, Munich.
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September 1, 1941: Richard Strauss (77) signs an agreement with Baldur von Schirach, Gauleiter of Vienna. Strauss will help restore Viennese musical life in return for von Schirach’s protection of his daughter-in-law (a Jew) and grandsons.
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February 23, 1942: Despondent over the victories of fascism, especially the fall of Singapore, Stefan Zweig, one-time librettist for Richard Strauss (77), kills himself in Petropolis, near Rio de Janeiro. He and his wife Lotte take poison together. See 24 June 1935.
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March 9, 1942: Two Songs for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (77) to words of Weinheber are performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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October 28, 1942: Capriccio, an opera by Richard Strauss (78), to words of Krauss and the composer, is performed for the first time, at the Munich Staatsoper. It is a hit with press and public.
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January 31, 1943: Divertimento for chamber orchestra by Richard Strauss (78) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 9, 1943: Festmusik für den Trumpetercorps der Stadt Wien by Richard Strauss (78) is performed for the first time, from the tower of the Vienna Rathaus under the direction of the composer.
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August 11, 1943: Concerto for horn and orchestra no.2 by Richard Strauss (79) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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October 3, 1943: World War II: German paratroopers land on Kos and within 24 hours overwhelm the British garrison capturing 4,500 British and Italians. The National Theatre of Munich containing the Staatsoper is destroyed by incendiary bombs dropped during an Allied air raid. Richard Strauss (79) writes that “this was the greatest catastrophe which has ever been brought into my life, for which there can be no consolation and in my old age no hope...”
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October 6, 1943: The Kreisleiter of Garmisch informs Richard Strauss (79) that his villa will be used to house evacuees.
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December 4, 1943: A propaganda film called Philharmoniker is shown for the first time, in Tauentzien-Palast, Berlin. It is a tribute to the Berlin Philharmonic and its conductor Wilhelm Furtwängler. When Furtängler found that the film ascribes to Hitler a fundamental influence over the organization, he withdrew from the project. Joseph Goebbels asked Richard Strauss (79) to replace him. Strauss had no problem with allowing himself to be filmed conducting the orchestra.
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January 24, 1944: After Richard Strauss (79) refuses to take evacuees into his Garmisch home (saying “no one had to die on my account”), Hitler orders that his porter’s lodge be seized. Strauss is forbidden to travel to Switzerland for his annual cure and the Führer further orders that “leading party personalities who have hitherto had personal contacts with Dr. Richard Strauss are to cease to do so in any way.” However, his works are not banned.
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June 11, 1944: A two-week festival of the music of Richard Strauss culminates today in Vienna, the 80th birthday of the composer. He conducts Till Eulenspiegel and Symphonia domestica with the Vienna Philharmonic. In the evening he conducts a performance of Aridane auf Naxos in a live radio broadcast.
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June 18, 1944: Sonatina no.1 for 16 wind instruments by Richard Strauss (80) is performed for the first time, in Dresden as part of celebrations surrounding Strauss’ 80th birthday.
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August 16, 1944: Die Liebe der Danae, an opera by Richard Strauss (80) to words of Gregor after Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, in an open dress rehearsal in the Salzburg Festspielhaus. The premiere will be cancelled in the aftermath of the bomb plot on Hitler. See 14 August 1952.
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February 15, 1945: World War II: Uruguay and Venezuela announce a state of war with Germany and Japan. After analysis of aerial photographs of the Dresden raid, American planes bomb the city again, hoping to kill firefighters. It is estimated that somewhere between 25,000 and 100,000 people, mostly women and children, lose their lives in Dresden. Richard Strauss (80) writes “I am in a mood of despair! The Goethehaus, the world’s greatest sanctuary, destroyed! My lovely Dresden--Weimar--Munich, all gone!”
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April 12, 1945: At his home in Garmisch, Richard Strauss (80) completes the score to his Metamorphosen.
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April 29, 1945: American troops reach Garmisch and intend to billet themselves in a large villa. Answering their knock, an 80-year-old man opens the door and announces, “I am Richard Strauss, the composer of Der Rosenkavalier and Salome.” The officer in charge recognizes Strauss who invites them in and offers them wine and food. The soldiers do not to disturb the composer’s privacy and proceed to take over another house.
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May 1, 1945: Listeners to German radio are told to stand by for an important announcement. This is followed by excerpts from Götterdämmerung and the slow movement of Anton Bruckner's (†48) Seventh Symphony (composed for the death of Wagner (†62)). Finally, Admiral Dönitz, speaking from Hamburg, announces the death of Hitler. He also appeals that the fight against Bolshevism be continued. Hans Werner Henze (18) is one of a small group of soldiers in a village near Esbjerg, Denmark who listens to the broadcast. They light a candle and celebrate surviving the war. In Garmisch, Richard Strauss (81) writes in his diary, “...from 1 May onwards the most terrible period of human history came to an end, the twelve-year reign of bestiality, ignorance, and anti-culture under the greatest criminals, during which Germany’s 2,000 years of cultural evolution met its doom and irreplaceable monuments of architecture and works of art were destroyed by a criminal rabble of soldiers. Accursed be technology!”
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January 25, 1946: Metamorphosen “In memoriam” for 23 strings by Richard Strauss (81) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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February 26, 1946: Oboe Concerto by Richard Strauss (81) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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March 25, 1946: Sonatina no.2 for 16 winds by Richard Strauss (81) is performed for the first time, in Winterthur, Switzerland.
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October 9, 1946: After considerable bureaucratic wrangling, Richard Strauss (82) and his wife are able to leave Germany for Switzerland.
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January 5, 1947: An dem Baum Daphne for chorus by Richard Strauss (82) to words of Gregor, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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June 26, 1947: A Symphonic Fantasy on themes from Die Frau ohne Schatten by Richard Strauss (83) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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October 4, 1947: Richard Strauss (83) rides in an airplane for the first time, from Zürich to London where he will conduct his music.
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October 29, 1947: Richard Strauss (83) conducts professionally for the last time, directing his own Till Eulenspiegel in Royal Albert Hall, London.
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April 4, 1948: Duett-Concertino for clarinet, bassoon, strings, and harp by Richard Strauss (83) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio-Svizzera-Italiana originating in Lugano.
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June 8, 1948: A Munich court absolves Richard Strauss (83) of any wrongdoing in his involvement with the Nazi regime.
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December 15, 1948: In the Clinique Cécile in Lausanne, a large stone is removed from the bladder of Richard Strauss (84).
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May 10, 1949: Richard Strauss (84) and his wife Pauline board a train in Zürich to return to their home in Garmisch. They have not seen it in over three-and-a-half years.
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June 8, 1949: Richard Strauss (84) is made an honorary citizen of Bayreuth.
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June 10, 1949: Richard Strauss conducts the end of Act II of Der Rosenkavalier in the Prinzregententheater in Munich, on the eve of his 85th birthday. It is the last time he will conduct in public.
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August 15, 1949: Richard Strauss (85) suffers a heart attack.
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August 27, 1949: Richard Strauss (85) suffers several attacks of angina at his home in Garmisch.
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September 8, 1949: 14:12 Richard Georg Strauss dies while sleeping, from poisoning brought on by an inoperable kidney stone, at his villa at Zoeppritzstraße 42 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Federal Republic of Germany, aged 85 years, two months, and 28 days. After a death mask is made, the mortal remains will be cremated according to his wish.
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September 11, 1949: The earthly remains of Richard Strauss are cremated in Munich. (They are housed at the Richard Strauss Villa in Garmisch)
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September 12, 1949: A memorial service for Richard Strauss is held in the Ostfriedhof in Munich. Many dignitaries are present. According to Strauss’ wish, the final trio from Der Rosenkavalier is performed, but the three sopranos are so overcome with grief that one by one they drop out. The orchestra plays on and they all manage to reenter before the end.
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May 22, 1950: Vier letzte Lieder for voice and orchestra by Richard Strauss (†0) to words of Eichendorff and Hesse, are performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London.
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March 31, 1951: München: ein Gedächtniswalzer by Richard Strauss (†1) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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March 2, 1952: Die Göttin im Putzzimmer for chorus by Richard Strauss (†2) to words of Rückert, is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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August 14, 1952: Die Liebe der Danae, an opera by Richard Strauss (†2) to words of Gregor after Hofmannsthal, is performed for the first time, in the Salzburg Festspielhaus. See 16 August 1944.
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April 17, 1953: Jascha Heifetz is attacked by a man wielding a metal pipe in Jerusalem. The man objected to a concert by Heifetz which included music of Richard Strauss (†3). Heifetz is slightly injured.
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November 30, 1958: Rote Rosen, a song for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (†9) to words of Stieler, is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York 75 years after it was composed.
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June 24, 1962: A fountain honoring Richard Strauss (†12) is erected on the site of his birthplace in Munich. The house was destroyed during an Allied air raid in World War II.
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November 20, 1963: The Nationaltheater of Munich housing the Staatsoper opens to an invited audience who see Richard Strauss’ (†14) Die Frau ohne Schatten. It was reconstructed to its exact appearance before destruction by Allied bombs on 18 October 1943.
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September 14, 1984: The manuscript of a late song by Richard Strauss (†35) is found in the estate of singer Maria Jeritza.
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January 10, 1985: Malven for voice and piano by Richard Strauss (†35) is performed for the first time, in New York 37 years after it was composed.
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June 18, 2014: An Overture in a minor by Richard Strauss (†64) is performed for the first time, in the Kongresshaus, Festaal Werdenfels, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 135 years after it was composed.