A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Peter Sculthorpe

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April 29, 1929: Peter Joshua Sculthorpe is born in Launceston, Tasmania, Commonwealth of Australia, the first of two children born to Joshua Tasman Sculthorpe, a general store owner, and Edna Moorehouse, an English immigrant, the daughter of an engine-fitter for mines.
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December 7, 1941: Peter Sculthorpe (12) is confirmed in the Anglican Church in Launceston by the Lord Bishop of Tasmania.
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August 31, 1945: Works for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (16) are performed for the first time, over the local Tasmanian airwaves of the Australian Broadcasting Commission, by the composer: Nocturne, Short Piece for Pianoforte no.1, and Prelude to a Puppet Show.
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September 11, 1945: Works for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (16) are performed for the first time, over the local Tasmanian airwaves of the Australian Broadcasting Commission, by the composer: Falling Leaves and Winter Woodland.
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March 12, 1946: Peter Sculthorpe (16) has his first piano lesson with Raymond Lambert in Melbourne.
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May 9, 1946: Peter Sculthorpe (17) gives his first performance on the Australian mainland, playing some of his piano compositions in Melbourne.
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August 24, 1946: Evocation for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (17) is performed for the first time, over the local Tasmanian airwaves of the Australian Broadcasting Commission by the composer.
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October 6, 1947: Aboriginal Legend for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (18) is performed for the first time, at Melbourne University, by the composer.
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August 3, 1948: String Quartet no.2 by Peter Sculthorpe (19) is performed for the first time, in Melbourne.
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June 22, 1949: Nocturne (W41) for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (20) is performed for the first time, in Assembly Hall, Melbourne.
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October 26, 1949: String Quartet no.3 by Peter Sculthorpe (20) is performed for the first time, in the British Music Society Rooms, Melbourne.
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June 14, 1950: String Quartet no.4 by Peter Sculthorpe (21) is performed for the first time, in the British Music Society Rooms, Melbourne.
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April 24, 1951: Peter Sculthorpe (21) graduates from Melbourne University.
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August 22, 1951: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play Much Ado About Nothing by Peter Sculthorpe (22) is performed for the first time, in Launceston, Tasmania.
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October 7, 1952: Incidental music to Molière’s play The Miser by Peter Sculthorpe (23) is performed for the first time, in Launceston, Tasmania.
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March 31, 1954: Incidental music to Lindsay and Grouse’s play Life with Father by Peter Sculthorpe (24) is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Launceston, Tasmania.
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March 28, 1955: Sonata for violin by Peter Sculthorpe (25) is performed for the first time, in Assembly Hall, Melbourne.
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June 19, 1955: Sonatina for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (26) is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden.
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June 30, 1955: Irkanda I for violin by Peter Sculthorpe (26) is performed for the first time, in the British Music Society Rooms, Melbourne.
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March 17, 1956: Incidental music to Sutherland’s play Junius on Horseback by Peter Sculthorpe (26) is performed for the first time, in the Playhouse, Hobart, Tasmania.
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June 29, 1956: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play Twelfth Night by Peter Sculthorpe (27) is performed for the first time, in Canberra.
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November 9, 1956: Ulterior Motifs, a musical farce by Peter Sculthorpe (27) to words of Throssell and Godfrey-Smith, is performed for the first time, in the Riverside Theatre, Canberra.
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November 22, 1956: The Games of the 16th Olympiad of the Modern Era open in Melbourne, for the first time in the Southern Hemisphere. Egypt, Iraq, and Lebanon boycott to protest the Israeli occupation of the Sinai. The Netherlands, Spain, and Switzerland boycott to protest the Soviet invasion of Hungary. Public pressure in Switzerland, however, forces their Olympic committee to rescind the boycott. Among those viewing the ceremony is Peter Sculthorpe (27).
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June 17, 1957: Incidental music to Duncan’s radio play Don’t Listen Ladies by Peter Sculthorpe (28) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Australian Broadcasting Commission.
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September 12, 1957: Cross Section, a revue with six songs by Peter Sculthorpe (28) to words of McKellar, is performed for the first time, in the Phillip Street Theatre, Sydney.
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July 28, 1958: Incidental music to Duncan’s play Some New Moon by Peter Sculthorpe (29) is performed for the first time, in Hobart, Tasmania.
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August 5, 1958: Peter Sculthorpe (29) sails from Melbourne aboard the Italian ship Neptunia, making for Europe. It will take him a month to get there.
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September 7, 1958: Over a month after leaving Melbourne, Peter Sculthorpe (29) arrives in London.
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November 23, 1958: Prophecy for unison chorus and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (29) to words of the Bible, is performed for the first time, in Birmingham, Great Britain.
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January 12, 1959: Peter Sculthorpe (29) is accepted into Wadham College, Oxford.
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February 9, 1959: Incidental music to Molière’s play L’Avare by Peter Sculthorpe (29) is performed for the first time, at Oxford.
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February 29, 1960: Irkanda II (String Quartet no.5) by Peter Sculthorpe (30), is performed for the first time, at Lincoln College, Oxford. It is the winner of the £100 Royal Concert Fund Prize.
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August 13, 1960: Two works by Peter Sculthorpe (31) are performed for the first time, in Attingham Hall, Shropshire: Sun for voice and piano to words of Lawrence, and Sonata for viola and percussion.
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October 24, 1960: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play King Lear by Peter Sculthorpe (31) is performed for the first time, at Oxford.
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November 4, 1960: After two years in Britain, Peter Sculthorpe (31) boards a plane at Heathrow Airport and flies home to Australia.
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November 6, 1960: Peter Sculthorpe (31) arrives in Melbourne after two years in Britain.
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November 30, 1960: The Loneliness of Bunjil for violin, viola, and cello by Peter Sculthorpe (31) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London.
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February 18, 1961: Irkanda III for piano trio by Peter Sculthorpe (31) is performed for the first time, in the Birmingham Art Gallery, Great Britain.
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August 5, 1961: Irkanda IV for violin, strings, and percussion by Peter Sculthorpe (32) is performed for the first time, in Nicholas Hall, Melbourne.
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December 20, 1962: They Found a Cave, a film with music by Peter Sculthorpe (33), is shown for the first time, at the Hobart Odeon, Tasmania.
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July 7, 1963: Peter Sculthorpe (34) accepts the position of lecturer at the University of Sydney.
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October 16, 1963: The first movement of Sonata for piano (W87) by Peter Sculthorpe (34) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Australian Broadcasting Commission, originating in Hobart. See 3 November 1963.
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November 3, 1963: Sonata for piano (W87) by Peter Sculthorpe (34) is performed completely for the first time, in Cell Block Theatre, Sydney, by the composer. See 16 October 1963.
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December 10, 1963: The Fifth Continent for speaker, chamber orchestra, and recorded sound by Peter Sculthorpe (34) to words of Lawrence is performed for the first time, in a recording session by the Australian Broadcasting Commission in Melbourne.  See 13 December 1963.
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December 13, 1963: The Fifth Continent for speaker, chamber orchestra, and recorded sound by Peter Sculthorpe (34) to words of Lawrence is performed before a live audience for the first time, in the City Hall of Hobart, Tasmania.  See 10 December 1963.
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April 1, 1965: String Quartet no.6 by Peter Sculthorpe (35) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Sydney.
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May 21, 1965: South by Five for girls voices and instruments by Peter Sculthorpe (36) is performed for the first time, in Sydney.
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September 30, 1965: Sun Music I for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (36) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London. The press is very positive.
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March 13, 1966: Sun Music for voices and percussion by Peter Sculthorpe (36) is performed for the first time, in Elder Hall, Adelaide, South Australia.
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July 29, 1966: String Quartet no.7 by Peter Sculthorpe (37) is performed for the first time, in Norfolk, Connecticut.
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September 20, 1966: Peter Sculthorpe (37) drives from Yale University to Yaddo artists’ colony near Saratoga Springs, New York. There he will meet Ned Rorem (42).
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November 18, 1966: Sun Music III for string orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (37) is performed for the first time, in Melbourne. See 16 May 1967.
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February 18, 1967: Peter Sculthorpe (37) departs Yaddo in New York after five months there, and in two days will return to Australia.
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May 16, 1967: Anniversary Music for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (38) is performed for the first time, in Winthrop Hall, Perth, West Australia. It will be renamed Sun Music III and take the place of the original work for strings by that name. See 18 November 1966.
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May 29, 1967: Sun Music IV for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (38) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Melbourne.
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March 20, 1968: Tabuh Tabuhan for wind quintet and percussion by Peter Sculthorpe (38) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Adelaide, South Australia.
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April 14, 1968: Music for Mittagong for winds, strings, percussion, and many voices by Peter Sculthorpe (38) is performed for the first time, in Mittagong, New South Wales.
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August 2, 1968: Sun Music, a ballet by Peter Sculthorpe (39) to a choreography by Helpmann, is performed for the first time, in Her Majesty’s Theatre, Sydney.
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October 7, 1968: Music for Vietnam for string quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (39) is performed for the first time, in Teachers Federation Hall, Sydney.
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November 22, 1968: Peter Sculthorpe (39) is awarded a Britannica Australia Medal at Melbourne Town Hall. The prize is $10,000.
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February 22, 1969: Sun Music II for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (39) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Sydney.
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March 27, 1969: Age of Consent, a film with music by Peter Sculthorpe (39), is shown for the first time, in the Odeon Theatre, Brisbane.
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August 20, 1969: Peter Sculthorpe (40) takes part is an illegal production of the anti-war America Hurrah by Jean-Claude van Itallie, in Sydney. After the production, workers take down the set to prevent police from using it as evidence.
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October 1, 1969: As Toru Takemitsu (38) arrives in Sydney for the Canberra Spring Festival, he is met at the airport by Peter Sculthorpe (40). Takemitsu’s Eucalypts I&II will be inspired by trips the two of them take into the bush near Canberra.
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October 31, 1969: String Quartet no.8 by Peter Sculthorpe (40) is performed for the first time, at Sussex University, Brighton, Great Britain, before the jury for the Radcliffe Prize.  The jury includes Benjamin Britten (56) and Thea Musgrave (41).  See 15 January 1970.
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January 15, 1970: String Quartet no.8 by Peter Sculthorpe (40) is performed publicly for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.  See 31 October 1970.
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February 14, 1970: Love 200 for voice, rock band, and orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (40), to words of Morphett, is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Sydney.
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May 25, 1970: Music for Japan for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (41) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Melbourne.
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September 21, 1970: Dream for any instruments and performers by Peter Sculthorpe (41) is performed for the first time, in the Cell Block Theatre, Sydney.
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October 12, 1970: Rain for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (41) is performed for the first time, in Sydney Town Hall.
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November 16, 1970: Overture for a Happy Occasion by Peter Sculthorpe (41) is performed for the first time. The work was composed to celebrate the reopening of the Princess Theatre in the composer’s home town of Launceston, Tasmania. Ceremonies are attended by the Governor-General of Australia and the Premier of Tasmania.
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February 28, 1971: Three of the five Night Pieces for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (41) are performed for the first time, in the Octagon Theatre of the University of Western Australia, Perth. Also premiered is Sculthorpe’s Landscape I for amplified piano and tape.
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May 21, 1971: Love 201, a ballet by Peter Sculthorpe (42) for rock band and prerecorded sounds, is performed for the first time, in Canberra Playhouse.
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October 4, 1971: How the Stars Were Made for percussion ensemble by Peter Sculthorpe (42) is performed for the first time, in the Playhouse, Canberra.
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July 8, 1972: Ketjak for six male voices by Peter Sculthorpe (43) to nonsense syllables is performed for the first time, in Pittville Pump Room, Cheltenham.
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July 12, 1972: Taverner, an opera by Peter Maxwell Davies (37) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. Among the audience is Peter Sculthorpe (43).
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October 12, 1973: Koto Music I for amplified piano and tape by Peter Sculthorpe (44) is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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May 6, 1974: The Song of Tailitnama for voice, six cellos, and percussion by Peter Sculthorpe (45), to an aboriginal text, is performed for the first time, in Melbourne for the taping of the documentary Sun Music for Film.
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September 25, 1974: Sun Music for Film, a film about the creation of Peter Sculthorpe’s (45) The Song of Talitnama, is aired by the Australian Broadcasting Commission.  This is the first public performance of the new work.
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September 27, 1974: Rites of Passage, a theatre piece by Peter Sculthorpe (45) to his own words after several sources, is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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November 13, 1974: The film Tabuh Tabuhan: Peter Sculthorpe in Bali, about Sculthorpe’s (45) use of Balinese musical materials, is aired by the Australian Broadcasting Commission.
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October 17, 1975: String Quartet no.9 by Peter Sculthorpe (46) is performed for the first time, in the Everest Theatre, Sydney.
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May 26, 1976: Lament for Strings by Peter Sculthorpe (47) is performed for the first time, in City Hall, Wollongong, New South Wales.
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August 27, 1976: Alone for violin by Peter Sculthorpe (47) is performed for the first time, in Nuku’alofa, Tonga.
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June 11, 1977: Peter Sculthorpe (48) is awarded an OBE in the Queen’s Birthday honors.
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August 16, 1977: Port Essington for string trio and string orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (48) is performed for the first time, in Mayne Hall, University of Queensland, Brisbane.
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April 27, 1978: Landscape II for string trio and amplified piano by Peter Sculthorpe (48) is performed for the first time, in Queen Street Galleries, Woollahra, Sydney.
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April 29, 1978: Eliza Fraser Sings, a music theatre piece for soprano, flute, and piano by Peter Sculthorpe, to words of Blackman, is performed for the first time, in Walter Hall, University of Toronto, Ontario on the composer’s 49th birthday.
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April 14, 1979: Requiem for cello by Peter Sculthorpe (49) is performed for the first time, in Clubbe Hall, Mittagong, New South Wales.
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April 27, 1979: Mangrove for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (49) is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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April 28, 1979: Four Little Pieces for piano duet by Peter Sculthorpe are performed for the first time, at the Sydney Opera House, on the eve of the composer’s 50th birthday.
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January 16, 1980: Cantares for guitars and string quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (50) is performed for the first time, at the Seymour Center, Sydney.
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July 9, 1980: Manganinnie, a film with music by Peter Sculthorpe (51), is shown for the first time, in Hobart, Tasmania.
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July 10, 1980: The Visions of Captain Quiros for guitar and orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (51) is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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October 12, 1980: Sonata for cello by Peter Sculthorpe (51) is performed for the first time, in Cell Block Theatre, Sydney, 21 years after it was composed.
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November 21, 1980: Overture for organ by Peter Sculthorpe (51) is performed for the first time, in Albert Hall, Launceston, Tasmania.
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May 15, 1981: Tailitnama Song for chamber ensemble by Peter Sculthorpe (52) is performed for the first time, in Paddington Town Hall, Sydney.
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June 28, 1981: Nocturnal for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (52) is performed for the first time, in North Caulfield, Victoria.
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July 4, 1981: Mountains for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (52) is performed for the first time, in Verbrugghen Hall of Sydney Conservatorium.
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July 1, 1982: Quiros, a television opera by Peter Sculthorpe (53) to words of Bell, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Australian Broadcasting Commission.
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April 8, 1983: String Quartet no.10 by Peter Sculthorpe (53) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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August 20, 1983: Piano Concerto by Peter Sculthorpe (54) is performed for the first time, in Canberra.
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September 22, 1983: Little Suite for Strings by Peter Sculthorpe (54) is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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November 29, 1983: First Sonata for Strings by Peter Sculthorpe (54) is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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October 20, 1984: Sun Song for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (55) is performed for the first time, in Winthrop Hall of the University of Western Australia in Perth.
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November 1, 1985: Burke and Wills, a film with music by Peter Sculthorpe (56), is shown for the first time, in Hoyts Cinema Center, Melbourne.
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March 5, 1986: Burke and Wills Suite for brass band by Peter Sculthorpe (56) is performed for the first time, in St. Peter’s Cathedral, Adelaide, South Australia.
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August 22, 1986: Earth Cry for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (57) is performed for the first time, in the Festival Theatre, Adelaide, South Australia.
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October 13, 1987: Songs of Sea and Sky for clarinet and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (58) is performed for the first time, in Sprague Memorial Hall, Yale University.
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January 26, 1988: Child of Australia for speaker, soprano, chorus, and orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (58) to words of Keneally, is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House to celebrate the bicentennial of European settlement in Australia.
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May 19, 1988: Second Sonata for Strings by Peter Sculthorpe (59) is performed for the first time, in Brighton, Great Britain.
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July 24, 1988: Kakadu for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (59) is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado.
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December 24, 1988: The Birthday of Thy King for chorus by Peter Sculthorpe (59), to words of Vaughan, is performed for the first time, during the Festival of Nine Lesson and Carols at King’s College, Cambridge.
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April 3, 1989: Djilie for cello and piano by Pete Sculthorpe (59) is performed for the first time, in the Museum of Contemporary Art, Brisbane.
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June 1, 1989: Jabiru Dreaming for percussion ensemble by Peter Sculthorpe (60) is performed for the first time, in Neuilly-sur-Seine.
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July 30, 1989: Callabonna for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (60) is performed for the first time, in Melba Hall of the University of Melbourne.
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October 24, 1989: Nourlangie, a concerto for guitar, percussion, and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (60) is performed for the first time, in Brisbane, Queensland.
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January 26, 1990: Peter Sculthorpe (60) is made an officer of the Order of Australia.
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March 7, 1990: Djilile for percussion ensemble by Peter Sculthorpe (60) is performed for the first time, in Elder Hall, Adelaide, South Australia.
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March 10, 1990: String Quartet no.11 by Peter Sculthorpe (60) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Adelaide, South Australia.
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April 18, 1990: Haughty Sortie for chorus and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (60) to words of his mother is performed for the first time, in Colorado Springs.
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June 6, 1990: Little Nourlangie for organ and orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (61) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Sydney.
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July 14, 1991: Nangaloar for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (62) is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado.
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September 14, 1991: Irkanda IV for string quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (62) is performed for the first time, in Perth, Western Australia.
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September 22, 1991: Lament for cello and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (62) is performed for the first time, in the Sydney Opera House.
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November 13, 1991: Peter Sculthorpe (62) is elected a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities.
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December 11, 1991: From Uluru for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (62) is performed for the first time, in Eugene Goossens Hall, Sydney.
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December 20, 1991: Threnody for cello by Peter Sculthorpe (62) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, Sydney.
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March 7, 1992: Hill-Song no.1 for string quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (62) is performed for the first time, in Longford, Tasmania.
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May 23, 1992: Tropic for clarinet, violin, two guitars, double bass, and percussion by Peter Sculthorpe (63) is performed for the first time, in Brighton, Great Britain.
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October 31, 1992: Dream Tracks for violin, clarinet, and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (63) is performed for the first time, in San Diego, California.
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April 3, 1993: From Saibai for violin and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (63) is performed for the first time, in Penrith, Australia.
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April 8, 1993: From Nourlangie for piano quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (63) is performed for the first time, in Purcell Room, London.
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July 2, 1993: Memento Mori for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (64) is performed for the first time, in Perth, Western Australia.
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July 8, 1993: From Kakadu for guitar by Peter Sculthorpe (64) is performed for the first time, in Darwin, Australia.
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July 10, 1993: Third Sonata for Strings by Peter Sculthorpe (64) is performed for the first time, in Darwin, Australia.
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August 19, 1993: Lament for string sextet by Peter Sculthorpe (64) is performed for the first time, in Dartington, Great Britain.
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October 17, 1993: Into the Dreaming for cello by Peter Sculthorpe (64) is performed for the first time, in Eugene Goossens Hall, Sydney.
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July 19, 1994: String Quartet no.12 by Peter Sculthorpe (65) is performed for the first time, in Barbican Hall, London.
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August 28, 1994: Chorale for eight cellos by Peter Sculthorpe (65) is performed for the first time, at the Vale of Glamorgan Festival, Great Britain.
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February 18, 1995: Darwin Marching for trumpet and orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (65) is performed for the first time, in the Northern Territory Parliament House, Darwin.
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July 7, 1995: Simori for flute and guitar by Peter Sculthorpe (66) is performed for the first time, at the Northern Territory University, Darwin.
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October 17, 1995: Night Song for clarinet, violin, and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (66) is performed for the first time, in Weill Recital Hall, New York.
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June 24, 1996: Port Arthur: In Memoriam for oboe or trumpet and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (67) is performed for the first time, in Government House, Hobart, Tasmania.
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October 9, 1996: An arrangement of Advance Australia Fair for strings by Peter Sculthorpe (67) is performed for the first time, in a recording by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
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October 27, 1996: Psalm 150 for treble voices and optional voice or instruments by Peter Sculthorpe (67) is performed for the first time, in Launceston, Tasmania.
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November 26, 1996: Maranoa Lullaby for mezzo-soprano and string quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (67) to aboriginal words is performed for the first time, in the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.
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December 3, 1996: String Quartet no.13 by Peter Sculthorpe (67) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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July 12, 1997: Love Song for guitar and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (68) is performed for the first time, in Darwin, Northern Territory.
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March 5, 1998: String Quartet no.14 by Peter Sculthorpe (68) is performed for the first time, in Novotel, Tasmania.
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April 29, 1998: Cello Dreaming for cello, strings, and percussion by Peter Sculthorpe is performed for the first time, at the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester on the composer’s 69th birthday.
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August 6, 1998: A Little Book of Hours for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (69) is performed for the first time, in Great Britain.
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August 25, 1998: For Justine for cello by Peter Sculthorpe (69) is performed for the first time, in Dartington, Great Britain.
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October 13, 1998: Great Sandy Island for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (69) is performed for the first time, in Suntory Hall, Tokyo.
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February 5, 1999: Rockpool Dreaming for soprano saxophone and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (69) is performed for the first time, in City Hall, Newcastle, New South Wales.
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July 10, 1999: String Quartet no.15 by Peter Sculthorpe (70) is performed for the first time, in Melba Hall, Melbourne.
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September 23, 1999: My Country Childhood for string orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (70) is performed for the first time, in Adelaide, South Australia.
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October 22, 1999: Gondwana Land for string orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (70) is performed for the first time, in Malvern, Great Britain.
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June 3, 2001: Landscapes for voice and optional bass instruments by Peter Sculthorpe (72) to words of Wright is performed for the first time, in Sydney.
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October 20, 2001: Music for Federation for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (72) is performed for the first time, in Parliament House, Canberra.
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November 21, 2001: Looking Back for violin, viola, cello, and double bass by Peter Sculthorpe (72) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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July 6, 2002: Sydney Singing for oboe and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (73) is performed for the first time, in Pittville Pump Room, Cheltenham, Great Britain.
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March 3, 2004: Requiem for chorus, didjeridu, and orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (75) is performed for the first time, in Adelaide Town Hall.
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July 12, 2004: Little Passacaglia for piano by Peter Sculthorpe (75) is performed for the first time, at the Sydney Conservatory of Music.
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October 20, 2004: Koori Dreaming for recorder and guitar by Peter Sculthorpe (75) is performed for the first time, at Downing College, Cambridge.
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July 2, 2005: A Song for Fé for viola and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (76) is performed for the first time.
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July 23, 2005: Serenade for violin by Peter Sculthorpe (76) is performed for the first time, in London.
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November 5, 2005: String Quartet no.16 by Peter Sculthorpe (76) is performed for the first time, in Hamer Hall, Melbourne.
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April 29, 2006: Quamby for orchestra and didjeridu ad lib by Peter Sculthorpe is performed for the first time, in Boulder, Colorado, on the composer’s 77th birthday.
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June 17, 2006: Elegy for viola and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (77) is performed for the first time, in Sydney.
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October 21, 2006: Darwin Calypso for flute, clarinet, string quartet, and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (77) is performed for the first time, in Clancy Auditorium, Sydney.
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October 26, 2006: Baltimore Songlines for clarinet, violin, and piano by Peter Sculthorpe (77) is performed for the first time, at the National Aquarium, Baltimore.
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June 7, 2008: Tropic for orchestra by Peter Sculthorpe (79) is performed for the first time, in Brisbane, Queensland.
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February 8, 2009: Song of the Yarra for soprano, violin, chorus, and chamber ensemble by Peter Sculthorpe (79) is performed for the first time, in Elisabeth Murdoch Hall, Melbourne.
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August 8, 2009: Chaconne for violin and strings by Peter Sculthorpe (80) is performed for the first time, in Llewellyn Hall of the Canberra School of Music.
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September 12, 2009: A Little Song of Love for clarinet and string quartet by Peter Sculthorpe (80) is performed for the first time, at the University of New South Wales, Kensington.
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June 5, 2010: String Quartet no.18 by Peter Sculthorpe (81) is performed for the first time, in Montsalvat Barn Gallery, Melbourne.
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August 8, 2014: Peter Sculthorpe dies in Wolper Jewish Hospital in Woollahra, Sydney, Commonwealth of Australia, after a long illness, aged 85 years, three months and ten days.