A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

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January 27, 1756: 20:00 Joannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart is born at Getreidegasse 9 in the Archbishopric of Salzburg, the seventh and last child of Johann Georg Leopold Mozart (36), violinist and composer to the Archbishop of Salzburg, and Maria Anna Pertl, daughter of the deputy prefect of St. Gilgen (now deceased). Only two of the children survive infancy.
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January 28, 1756: Joannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart is baptized in St. Rupert’s Cathedral in Salzburg.
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September 1, 1761: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (5) makes his first public appearance, as a dancer in the play with music Sigismundus Hungariae rex in Salzburg.
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January 12, 1762: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (5) and his sister Nannerl are taken from Salzburg to Munich by their father Leopold (42) for a stay of three weeks.
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October 1, 1762: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (6) gives his first known public musical performance, at Trinity Inn, Linz.
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October 13, 1762: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (6) and his sister Nannerl perform at Schönbrunn Palace before Emperor Franz I, Empress Maria Theresia, Archduchess Marie Antoinette and the music teacher to the imperial family, Georg Christoph Wagenseil (47). Leopold (42) writes home to Salzburg, “Everyone is amazed, especially at the boy, and everyone whom I have heard says that his genius is incomprehensible.” (Solomon, 41)
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October 19, 1762: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (6) performs before the French ambassador in Vienna, Glorent-Louis-Marie Comte du Châtelet-Lomont, who invites him to Versailles. Leopold (42) sends home gifts from the Imperial family and many nobles totalling 120 ducats, about twice his annual salary.
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October 21, 1762: In Vienna, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (6) begins showing symptoms of scarlet fever. He will be in bed for ten days.
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November 4, 1762: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (6) has recovered from scarlet fever enough to go out of the house.
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June 13, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) performs before Elector Maximilian of Bavaria at Munich.
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June 14, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) and his sister Nannerl play for Duke Clemens Franz von Paula of Bavaria in Munich.
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June 15, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) and his sister Nannerl play for a second time before Duke Clemens of Bavaria in Munich.
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June 28, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) and his sister Nannerl give a public concert in Augsburg.
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June 30, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) and his sister Nannerl give a second public concert in Augsburg.
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July 4, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) and his sister Nannerl give their third and last public concert in Augsburg.
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July 18, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) performs before Count Theodor, Elector Palatine, in Schwetzingen, the summer palace near Mannheim.
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November 7, 1763: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) gives a concert before Prince Karl Alexander in Brussels.
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January 1, 1764: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (7) performs on the organ before King Louis XV of France in the chapel of the Palace of Versailles. The Mozart family attends a court dinner.
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February 16, 1764: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (8) is seized with a “violent sore throat and catarrh” in Paris and is in danger of choking to death. He will recover in four days.
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January 18, 1765: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (8) dedicates six sonatas for keyboard and violin (K.10-15) to British Queen Charlotte, in London.
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March 20, 1765: Six sonatas for keyboard and violin K.10-15 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (9) and dedicated to Queen Charlotte, go on sale in London.
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September 5, 1765: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (9) performs in Ghent.
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September 30, 1765: At least two early symphonies of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (9) are performed at The Hague.
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November 15, 1765: As his sister recovers from typhus, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (9) falls ill with the same disease at The Hague.
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December 11, 1765: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (9) arises from his sick bed at The Hague for the first time in a month.
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January 22, 1766: Symphony K.22 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (9) is probably performed for the first time, in a concert by the Mozart family at The Hague.
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March 7, 1766: The publication of two sets of variations for keyboard by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (10) is announced in The Hague: Eight Variations on a Dutch Song K.24 and Seven Variations on Willem van Nassau K.25.
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April 16, 1766: Publication of six sonatas for keyboard and violin K.26-31 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (10) is announced in The Hague.
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June 12, 1766: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (10) dates his Kyrie K.33.
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November 5, 1766: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (12) performs before Joseph, Landgrave of Hesse, in Dillingen.
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December 21, 1766: Or che il dover...Tali e cotanti sono, a concert aria for tenor and orchestra K.36 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (10), is performed for the first time, in Salzburg for the anniversary of the consecration of Archbishop Sigismund.
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March 12, 1767: Die Schuldigkeit des ersten und Fürnehmsten Gebots K.35, a sacred drama by three different composers to words of Weiser, is performed for the first time, in the Knight’s Hall of the Archepiscopal Palace, Salzburg. Part one is composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (11), part two by Michael Haydn (29) and part three by AC Adlgasser. Part One is performed today, part two a week from now, and part three two weeks hence.
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May 13, 1767: Apollo et Hyancinthus K.38, a latin intermezzo by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (11) to words possibly by Rufin Widl, is performed for the first time, in between the acts of Widl’s Clementia Croesi, at the Benedictine University, Salzburg.
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November 10, 1767: In Olmütz (Olomouc), Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (11) recovers from the symptoms of smallpox. His sister Nannerl now exhibits symptoms.
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January 19, 1768: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (11) and his family are received at the Viennese court by Maria Theresia and her son, the new Emperor Joseph II.
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April 6, 1768: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (12) and his sister perform in Vienna during celebrations surrounding the wedding of Archduchess Maria Carolina to King Ferdinando of Naples.
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December 7, 1768: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (12) Mass K.139/47a is performed, probably for the first time, before the Imperial Court, at the dedication ceremony of the Waisenhauskirche, Vienna, directed by the composer. Also premiered is Mozart’s Trumpet Concerto K.47c.
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December 13, 1768: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (12) dates his Symphony no.8 K.48, in Vienna.
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February 5, 1769: The Missa brevis K.65 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (13) is performed for the first time, in the Collegiate Church, Salzburg.
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May 1, 1769: La finta semplice K.51, an opera buffa by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (13) to words of Coltellini after Goldoni, is performed for the first time, at the Archepiscopal Palace, Salzburg. (There is no hard evidence that this performance actually took place, or if it did, that it was the first performance. But this date is often cited in the sources.)
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October 15, 1769: The Mass in C “Dominicus” K.66 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (13) is performed for the first time, in St. Peter’s Church, Salzburg.
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November 14, 1769: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (13) is appointed Third Konzertmeister to the Salzburg court. The position is unpaid.
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January 5, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (13) gives his first concert in Italy, at the Accademia Filarmonica in Verona.
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January 7, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (13) performs on the two organs in the Carmelite monastery of San Tommaso Becket in Verona. Leopold (50) writes that “such a mob had assembled at the...church that upon our arrival we scarcely had room to step down from the coach.” (Gutman, 258)
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February 7, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) performs at a reception given by Count Carl Joseph Firmian, Governor-General of Austrian Lombardy in Milan. It is attended by leading intellectual and artistic figures in Milan, including Giovanni Battista Sammartini (69). Firmian gives Wolfgang an edition of the works of Metastasio in nine volumes.
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February 15, 1770: The English scientist Daines Barrington reads his report on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) before the London Royal Society.
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April 20, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) performs in the Palazzo Chigi in the Piazza Colonna, Rome, before a distinguished audience invited by Cardinal Pallavicini.
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April 26, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) gives a concert before a distinguished audience in the Palazzo Barberini, Rome.
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May 30, 1770: Armida abbandonata, an opera seria by Nicolò Jommelli (55) to words of de Rogati after Tasso, is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples. In attendance are Leopold (50) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Wolfgang (14) describes it as “beautiful, but much too broken up and old-fashioned for the theatre.”
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July 5, 1770: In the name of Pope Clement XIV, Cardinal Pallavicini officially informs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) that he is to receive the Order of the Knight of the Golden Spur, in the Palazzo Quirinale, Rome.
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July 8, 1770: Pope Clement XIV receives Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) and his father Leopold (50) in a private audience at the Palazzo Santa Maria Maggiore. Wolfgang wears a ceremonial robe and his decoration as a Knight of the Golden Spur. Among the Pope’s entourage is the Bishop of Gurk, Hieronymus Colloredo, who will feature prominently in the lives of both Mozarts.
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July 9, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) is voted a member of the Accademia Filarmonica, Rome.
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July 27, 1770: In Bologna, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) receives an opera libretto from Vittorio Cigna-Santi which he is to set for performance in Milan. He learns for the first time that it is Mitridate, by Racine.
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October 9, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) is examined for membership in the Accademia Filarmonica, Bologna. He is required to display his proficiency in 16th century counterpoint. It is the culminating event of his study with Padre Giovanni Battista Martini (64). He passes.
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October 10, 1770: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) is accepted into membership in the Accademia Filarmonica, Bologna.
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October 12, 1770: Padre Giovanni Battista Martini (64) provides a written recommendation for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) in Bologna.
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December 26, 1770: Mitridate, rè di Ponto K.87, a dramma per musica by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) to words of Cigna-Santi after Parini and Racine, is performed for the first time, in the Regio Ducal Teatro, Milan, the composer at the keyboard. Including ballets by other composers, it lasts six hours. The opera succeeds, winning 22 performances.
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January 5, 1771: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (14) is named honorary Kapellmeister of the Verona Accademia Filarmonica.
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March 4, 1771: The Regio Ducal Teatro Milan commissions a new opera from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15), sending it to Salzburg today. It will be Lucio Silla.
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August 29, 1771: In Milan, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15) receives a libretto by Giuseppe Parini for Ascanio in Alba.
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October 17, 1771: Ascanio in Alba K.111, a festa teatrale by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15) to words of Parini, is performed for the first time, in the Teatro Regio Ducale, Milan, to celebrate the wedding of Archduke Ferdinand of Austria and Maria Ricciarda Berenice of Modena. Leopold Mozart (51) reports that it is “an extraordinary success” overshadowing the work by Hasse (72) performed last night.
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November 2, 1771: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15) completes his Symphony K.112 in Milan.
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November 22, 1771: Divertimento K.113 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15) is performed today or tomorrow for probably the first time, in Milan.
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December 12, 1771: After showing interest in hiring Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15), Archduke Ferdinand, Governor and Captain-General of Lombardy in Milan is warned in a letter from his mother, Empress Maria Theresia not to employ such “useless people.”
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December 16, 1771: Sigismund Christoph von Schrattenbach, Archbishop of Salzburg, employer of Leopold (52) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15), and Michael Haydn (34), dies at the age of 74.
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December 30, 1771: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (15) completes his Symphony K.114 in Salzburg.
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February 21, 1772: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (16) completes his Symphony K.124 in Salzburg.
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August 9, 1772: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (16) is granted a salary of 150 florins for the post of second Konzertmeister in Salzburg.
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December 26, 1772: Lucio Silla K.135, a dramma per musica by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (16) to words of de Gamerra, is performed for the first time, in the Teatro Regio Ducal, Milan. The curtain goes up late due to the tardy arrival of Archduke Ferdinand, and the production lasts six hours. Despite the inauspicious premiere, it will run for 26 performances.
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January 17, 1773: Exsultate, jubilate K.165, a solo motet by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (16), is performed for the first time, in the Church of the Theatines, Milan. It was composed for Venanzio Rauzzini, primo uomo in the Milan opera.
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March 24, 1773: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (17) dates his Divertimento K.166 in Salzburg.
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March 30, 1773: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (17) completes his Symphony no.26 K.184.
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May 19, 1773: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (17) dates his Symphony no.23 K.181 in Salzburg.
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October 3, 1773: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (17) dates his Symphony no.24 K.182 in Salzburg.
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October 5, 1773: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (17) dates his Symphony no.25 K.183 in Salzburg.
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April 4, 1774: Thamos, König in Ägypten, a play by Tobias Philipp Baron von Gebler, is performed in the Kärntnerthortheater, Vienna, probably for the first time, with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18).
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April 6, 1774: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Symphony no.29 K.201 in Salzburg.
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May 5, 1774: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Symphony no.30 K.202 in Salzburg.
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May 31, 1774: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Concertone K.190 in Salzburg.
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June 4, 1774: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Bassoon Concerto K.191 in Salzburg.
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June 24, 1774:  Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Missa brevis K.192 in Salzburg.
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August 8, 1774: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Missa brevis K.194 in Salzburg.
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November 17, 1774: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Symphony no.28 K.200 in Salzburg.
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January 13, 1775: La finta giardiniera K.196, an opera buffa by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) to words possibly by Petrosellini, is performed for the first time, in the Munich Assembly Rooms in the presence of Elector Maximilian III. It is warmly received.
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March 5, 1775: A setting of Misericordias Domini K.222 for chorus, two violins, bass and organ by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (19) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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April 14, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Violin Concerto K.207 in Salzburg.
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April 23, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (19) serenata Il ré pastore K.208 to words after Metastasio, is performed for the first time, in the Archepiscopal Palace, Salzburg for the visit of Archduke Maximilian Franz, youngest son of Empress Maria Theresia. The production is in a concert setting as there is no opera house in Salzburg.
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May 19, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his aria Si Mostra la Sorte K.209 in Salzburg.
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June 14, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Violin Concerto K.211 in Salzburg.
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August 5, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Serenade K.204 in Salzburg.
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August 20, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his March K. 214 in Salzburg.
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August 22, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his Piano Sonata K.284 in Salzburg.
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September 12, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (19) dates his Violin Concerto K.216 in Salzburg.
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October 26, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (18) dates his aria Voi avete un cor fedele K.217 in Salzburg.
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December 20, 1775: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (19) dates his Violin Concerto K.219 in Salzburg.
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March 31, 1776: Litaniae de venerabili altaris sacramento K.243 for solo voices, chorus, orchestra, and organ by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (20) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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June 18, 1776: The Divertimento K.247 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (20) is performed for the first time, for the name day of Countess Antonia Lodron (which is actually 13 June) in Salzburg.
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July 21, 1776: The Serenade K.250 “Haffner” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (20) is performed for the first time, for the evening before the wedding of Franz Xaver Anton Späth to Marie Elisabeth Haffner in Salzburg.
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July 26, 1776: The Divertimento K.251 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (20) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg for the 25th name day of his sister, Nannerl.
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September 4, 1776: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (20) sends his Misericordias Domini K.222 to Giovanni Battista Martini (70) in Bologna, following instructions to keep him informed of his progress in composition. The accompanying letter is written by Leopold Mozart (56).
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December 18, 1776: Padre Giovanni Battista Martini (70) responds to the letter of 4 September and accompanying compositions by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (20). He gives them high praise.
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June 13, 1777: Today is the name day of Countess Maria Antonia Lodron. Sometime within the next week, Divertimento K.287 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg, composed for the occasion.
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August 1, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) (actually written by Leopold (57)) petitions Archbishop Colloredo to be dismissed so that he may seek his fortune elsewhere.
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September 23, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21), accompanied by his mother, departs Salzburg for Munich. Both Leopold (57) and Nannerl are distraught at the parting, Nannerl to the point of vomiting.
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September 24, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) and his mother arrive in Munich from Salzburg.
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September 30, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) is received by Elector Maximilian III of Bavaria in Munich.
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October 1, 1777: Divertimento K.287 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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October 11, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) and his mother travel from Munich to Augsburg.
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October 12, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) is introduced to the Governor of Augsburg, Jakob Langemantel, by his uncle, Franz Alois Mozart.
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October 16, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) performs a concert in Augsburg.
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October 22, 1777: Concerto for three pianos K.242 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) is performed for the first time, in Augsburg, the composer at one keyboard.
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October 26, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) and his mother depart Augsburg for Mannheim.
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October 30, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) and his mother arrive in Mannheim from Augsburg.
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October 31, 1777: At the Mannheim court, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) goes to hear a rehearsal of Messiah directed by Vice-Kapellmeister Georg Joseph Vogler (28). Vogler, however, directs his own music for more than an hour. Mozart gives up and leaves.
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November 4, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) writes from Mannheim to his father, “Deputy-Kapellmeister Vogler (26), who had composed the mass which was performed the other day, is a dreary musical jester, an exceedingly conceited and rather incompetent fellow. The whole orchestra dislikes him. But today, Sunday, I heard a mass by Holzbauer (66), which he wrote twenty-six years ago, but which is very fine. He is a good composer, he has a good church style, he knows how to write for voices and instruments, and he composes good fugues.” (Anderson, 356)
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November 6, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) performs at a fete celebrating the name day of Elector Karl Theodor in Mannheim.
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November 14, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) writes to his father after seeing Ignaz Holzbauer’s (66) Günther von Schwarzburg in Mannheim that “Holzbauer’s music is very beautiful. The poetry doesn’t deserve such music. What surprises me most of all is that a man as old as Holzbauer should still possess so much spirit; for you can’t imagine what fire there is in that music.” (Anderson, 374)
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December 8, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) learns that he will not be receiving an appointment from the Mannheim court.
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December 21, 1777: A Missa brevis in B flat K.275 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) is performed for the first time, in St. Peter’s, Salzburg.
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December 25, 1777: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) dates his Flute Quartet K.285 in Mannheim.
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January 14, 1778: After several public discourtesies towards him, Vice-Kapellmeister Georg Joseph Vogler (28) calls on the visiting Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) in Mannheim. Mozart has been indiscreetly contemptuous towards Vogler.
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January 17, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) first mentions Aloysia Weber in a letter.
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January 23, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (21) travels without his mother from Mannheim to Kirchheimbolanden in the company of Fridolin Weber and his daughter Aloysia. They will spend several days at the court of Princess Caroline van Nassau-Weilburg where Aloysia sings and Mozart plays.
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January 29, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) arrives at Worms with the Webers.
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February 2, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) and the Webers return to Mannheim from Worms.
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February 14, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes to his father about a commission he has received for flute music, “...you know that I become quite powerless whenever I am obliged to write for an instrument which I cannot bear. Hence as a diversion I compose something else, such as duets for clavier and violin, or I work at my mass.” (Marshall, 62)
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March 11, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) dates his Duet Sonata for violin and piano K.296 in Mannheim.
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March 14, 1778: After four-and-a-half months, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) and his mother depart Mannheim for Paris.
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March 23, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) and his mother arrive in Paris from Mannheim.
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April 5, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) reports to his father from Paris that François Joseph Gossec (44) has been saying nice things about his music.
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May 1, 1778: The mother of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes home from Paris that she has had a toothache, sore throat and an earache for three weeks.
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May 14, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes from Paris that he has been offered the post of organist at Versailles.
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May 30, 1778: Voltaire (François-Marie Arouet) dies in Paris at the age of 83. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) will write to his father from Paris, “That godless, archvillain Voltaire has pegged out like a dog, like an animal--that’s his reward.” (Abert 510)
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June 11, 1778: Les petits riens, a ballet mostly by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) to a scenario after Piccinni, is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra. Mozart composed 13 of the 20 numbers and the overture.
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June 11, 1778: The mother of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) is attended by a physician in Paris who bleeds her to relieve her maladies.
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June 12, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) dates his Symphony K.297 in Paris and performs it tonight before a private audience at the home of Count Sickingen. See 18 June 1778.
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June 18, 1778: Symphony K.297 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) is performed publicly for the first time, at a Concert spirituel, Paris. It is “exceptionally successful.” (Abert, 507) Unfortunately, his mother is too ill to attend. See 12 June 1778.
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June 26, 1778: Dr. Franz Joseph Haina informs Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) that his mother will not recover from her illness. She has been in bed for a week.
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July 3, 1778: 2230 The mother of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) dies in Paris, probably of typhoid fever. A few hours later, the composer writes to his father, telling him that Frau Mozart is very ill.
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July 4, 1778: 0200 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes to a family friend in Salzburg, Abbé Bullinger, informing him of his mother’s death.
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July 9, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes to his father from Paris, “If only the confounded French language weren’t so damned impossible where music is concerned. It’s hopeless. German is divine in comparison. And then there are the singers! In fact, they shouldn’t be called singers at all, as they don’t sing but scream and howl at the tops of their voices.” (Abert, 499)
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July 20, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes to his father from Paris, “Well, what are you hearing about the war? For the last three days I have been dreadfully sad and depressed. True, it doesn’t really concern me, but I am so sensitive, that I immediately feel interested in any matter. I hear that the Emperor has been defeated...Second, it was said that the King had attacked the Emperor and completely surrounded him and that if General Laudon had not come to his rescue with eighteen hundred cuirassiers, he would have been taken prisoner; that sixteen hundred cuirassiers had been killed and Laudon himself shot dead.. Today, however, I was told that the Emperor had invaded Saxony with forty thousand men; but I don’t know whether this is true...”
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August 27, 1778: Shortly after seeing Johann Christian Bach (42) in Paris for the last time, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes to his father saying “I love him (as you know) with all my heart and respect him highly; and as for him, there is no doubt that he has praised me, not only to my face, but to others also, not in an exaggerated way like some, but seriously, truly.”
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September 26, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) departs Paris for Salzburg. One of his fellow travellers is a man who openly admits he suffers from “the French disease.”
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October 14, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) arrives in Strasbourg from Paris.
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October 17, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) performs the first of three concerts in Strasbourg. They are well received but attendance is low.
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November 2, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) writes to his father from Strasbourg, “Kapellmeister (Franz Xaver) Richter (68)...now lives very economically, for instead of forty bottles of wine a day he swills about twenty.” (Marshall, 351)
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November 3, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) departs Strasbourg for Mannheim on his way home from Paris. His departure has been delayed by flooding.
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November 6, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) reaches Mannheim on his way back to Salzburg from Paris.
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December 9, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) departs Mannheim on his way to Salzburg.
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December 13, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) reaches the Abbey of Kaysersheim on his way back to Salzburg from Paris.
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December 24, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) departs the Abbey of Kaysersheim making for Munich.
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December 25, 1778: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) reaches Munich on his way from Paris to Salzburg. He will lodge with the Weber family.
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January 7, 1779: In Munich, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) is introduced to Elisabeth Auguste, wife of the Elector of Bavaria, by Christian Cannabich. He presents her with a copy of his recently published piano sonatas K.301-306.
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January 13, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) departs Munich for Salzburg. He has been staying with the Weber family on his way back from Paris to Salzburg.
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January 15, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) returns to Salzburg after an absence of almost 16 months.
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January 17, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (22) is named to the position of court organist by the Archbishop of Salzburg.
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March 23, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (23) dates his Mass in C K.317 in Salzburg.
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April 4, 1779: The Mass in C “Coronation” K.317 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (23) is performed for the first time, in the Salzburg Cathedral.
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April 26, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (23) dates his Symphony K.318 in Salzburg.
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May 2, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (23) takes lodgings in Vienna with the mother of Constanze Weber.
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July 9, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (23) completes his Symphony K.319 in Salzburg.
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August 3, 1779: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (23) dates his Serenade K.320 in Salzburg.
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August 29, 1780: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (24) completes his Symphony K.338 in Salzburg.
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September 2, 1780: One of the nights September 2-4 probably sees the premiere of Symphony K.338 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (24) in Salzburg.
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November 5, 1780: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (24) departs Salzburg for Munich to produce Idomeneo.
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November 6, 1780: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (24) arrives in Munich to produce Idomeneo.
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December 30, 1780: In Munich, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (24) writes to his father Leopold (61) in Salzburg, trying to allay his fears about Idomeneo. “Everything has been composed, just not written down.” (Wolff, 160)
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January 29, 1781: Idomeneo, rè di Creta K.366, a dramma per musica by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) to words of Varesco after Danchet, is performed for the first time, at the Residenz, Munich. It is very successful. Leopold Mozart (61) and Nannerl are in attendance.
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March 8, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) dates his concert aria Misera! dove son...Ah! non son io (to words of Metastasio) K.369. He has composed it in Munich for Countess Josepha von Paumgarten, the mistress of Elector Carl Theodor. Mozart wants the elector to hire him.
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March 12, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25), in Munich, is summoned to Vienna by his employer, the Archbishop of Salzburg. His Eminence is in Vienna during the celebrations surrounding the coronation of Emperor Joseph II, and to attend his seriously ill father.
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March 16, 1781: 0900 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) arrives in Vienna from Munich. He performs at the Archbishop’s residence in the afternoon.
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March 21, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) dates is Rondo for horn, wind and strings K.371.
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March 24, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) dates his Violin Sonata K.372.
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April 3, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) performs publicly in Vienna for the first time since he was a boy, at the Kärntnertortheater. A symphony is performed, probably K.297 as well as the Variations on Je suis Lindor K.354. “I had to start all over again, because there was no end to the applause.” Among the audience is Emperor Joseph II.
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April 8, 1781: Archbishop Colloredo of Salzburg forbids Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) to perform for Emperor Joseph II at the home of Countess Thun. Mozart would have earned an amount equal to half his annual salary. In the evening, new works by Mozart are performed for the first time for the Archbishop, including the Concerto-Rondo for solo violin, two oboes, two horns and strings K.373, Sonata for violin and piano K.379 and the Rondo for soprano and orchestra A questo seno deh vieni…Or che il ciel K.374. The Concerto-Rondo was completed six days ago. The Sonata was composed last night, with Mozart writing down only the violin part. He plays the piano part from memory.
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April 12, 1781: Archbishop Colloredo orders his servant, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25), to leave Vienna on 22 April and return to Salzburg with all the court musicians. Mozart will not leave Vienna on 22 April.
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April 27, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) gives his last concert in the employ of the Archbishop of Salzburg, in the presence of His Eminence in Vienna.
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May 2, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) moves into the house of the Weber family in Vienna.
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May 9, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) argues with Archbishop Colloredo of Salzburg and requests to be discharged from his duties. “I am so sure of my success in Vienna that I would have resigned even without the slightest reason...I want to hear nothing more about Salzburg. I hate the Archbishop to madness.” (Marshall, 42)
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May 10, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) meets with Count Arco, the chamberlain to Archbishop Colloredo, in Vienna and gives him his resignation and the advance for travel expenses from the Archbishop. The count accepts neither.
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June 8, 1781: The Chief Steward of the Archbishop of Salzburg, Count Arco, notifies Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) that he is discharged from the service of His Eminence “with a kick on the arse, by order of our worthy Prince Archbishop.” (Glover, 94)
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July 30, 1781: Gottlieb Stephanie hands Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) the libretto to Die Entführung aus dem Serail.
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October 15, 1781: Serenade in E flat K.375 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) is performed for the first time, in Vienna. It was composed for St. Theresa’s Day.
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November 16, 1781: Archduke Maximilian III of Bavaria presents Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) to Duke Friedrich Eugen of Württemberg in Vienna. He performs for both of them.
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November 23, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) and Josepha Barbara Auernhammer give the first performance of the Sonata for two pianos K.448 at a private concert at her residence in Vienna.
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December 8, 1781: The Wiener Zeitung announces the publication of six violin sonatas K.296, 376-380 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) by Artaria & Co. They are the first works of Mozart to be published.
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December 15, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) informs his father Leopold (62) that he intends to marry Constanze Weber.
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December 24, 1781: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) and Muzio Clementi (29) take part in a piano playing contest before Emperor Joseph II and Grand Duke Pavel of Russia (later Tsar Pavel I) and the Grand Duchess. They are both required to improvise and play some of their own music. The Grand Duchess then requests that they play at sight sonatas by Paisiello (41). Mozart is judged to be the winner, but not by much. It is the first time the two composers meet.
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January 16, 1782: Three weeks after their famous duel, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (25) writes to his father (62) about Muzio Clementi (29). “He is an excellent cembalo player, that is all. He has great facility with his right hand. Apart from this, he has not a farthing’s worth of taste or feeling; he is a mere mechanicus.”
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March 3, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) gives an academy concert at the Burgtheater, Vienna. It is the high point of the season. He plays the Piano Concerto K.175 with a new rondo finale, K.382. This and the entire performance are very successful.
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April 10, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) writes to his father from Vienna, “I suppose you have heard that the English [Johann Christian] Bach (†0) is dead? What a loss to the musical world!”
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May 26, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) performs in the first of a series of Vienna concerts sponsored by Philipp Jakob Martin. He plays the Concerto for two pianos and orchestra K.365 with Josepha von Auernhammer.
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May 30, 1782: Following the sacking of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26), Michael Haydn (44) is named court organist by Archbishop Colloredo of Salzburg.
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June 28, 1782: Johann Valentin Günther, a private secretary to Emperor Joseph II, is arrested in Vienna on charges of being a Prussian spy, one day after dining with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26). He will be exonerated.
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July 16, 1782: Die Entführung aus dem Serail K.384, a singspiel by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) to words of Stephanie after Bretzner, is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Burgtheater. It is very successful and will be his most performed opera during his lifetime. On this day, Mozart decides to proceed with a marriage to Constanze Weber.
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July 27, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) writes to his father from Vienna, “I must ask you...to give me your permission to marry my dear Konstanze.--Do not suppose its just for the sake of getting married, if that were all, I’d gladly wait.--But I can see that it is absolutely necessary for the sake of my honor and that of my girl, as well as for the sake of my health and state of mind. My heart is restless and my head confused--how can anyone think or produce any sensible work in these circumstances?” (Abert, 695)
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July 29, 1782: Symphony K.385 “Haffner” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) is performed for the first time, for the ennoblement of Sigismund Haffner in Salzburg.
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July 31, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) writes to his father Leopold (62) once again asking his consent to marry Constanze Weber. He says that he expects his father’s approval in his next letter.
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August 2, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) and Constanze Weber take communion together.
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August 4, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) marries Maria Constanze Caecilia Josepha Johanna Aloisia Weber, daughter of a singer, in St. Stephen’s Cathedral, Vienna.
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August 7, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) writes to his father, “My opera (Die Entführung aus dem Serail) was given yesterday--and that too at Gluck’s (68) request. He has been very complimentary to me about it. I am lunching with him tomorrow.” (Marshall, 326)
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August 8, 1782: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) dines with Christoph Willibald Gluck (68) in Vienna.
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January 11, 1783: Mia speranza adorata…Ah, non sai qual pena, K.416, a concert aria by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) to words of Sertor, is performed for the first time, in Vienna, three days after it was composed.
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January 15, 1783: Publication of the Piano Concertos K.413-415 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (26) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 3, 1783: A pantomime K.446 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) is performed for the first time, in the Hofburg, Vienna.
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March 23, 1783: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) gives a benefit concert for himself before an overflow crowd, including Emperor Joseph II, in the Burgtheater, Vienna. The program includes the Symphony K.385, an aria from Idomeneo, Piano Concerto K.415, the concert aria Misera! dove son...Ah! non son io (to words of Metastasio) K.369, movements three and four from the Serenade in D K.320, Piano Concerto K.369 including the rondo-finale K.382, an aria from Lucio Silla, improvised variations on a theme of Paisiello (42) K.398 (encored), improvised variations on a theme of Gluck K.455, and the Recitative and Rondo K.416. Among the audience is Christoph Willibald Gluck (68). It is a gigantic success.
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April 21, 1783: The National Theatre in Prague officially opens for opera, singspiel, and stage plays. It will see the successes of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27): Le nozze di Figaro, Don Giovanni, and La Clemenza di Tito.
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May 7, 1783: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) writes to his father from Vienna. “Our poet here is now a certain Abbate da Ponte. He has an enormous amount to do in revising pieces for the theatre and he has to write per obbligo an entirely new libretto for Salieri (32) (Il ricco d’un giorno), which will take him two months. He has promised after that to write a new libretto for me. But who knows whether he will be able to keep his word--or will want to? For, as you are aware, these Italian gentlemen are very civil to your face. Enough, we know them! If he is in league with Salieri, I shall never get anything out of him.” (Anderson, 848)
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May 27, 1783: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) dates the score to his Horn Concerto K.417 in Vienna.
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June 17, 1783: A first child is born to Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) in Vienna, named Raimund Leopold.
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June 30, 1783: The aria for soprano and orchestra Vorrei Spiegarvi, oh Dio K.418 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) is performed for the first time, as part of Anfossi’s(56) Il curioso indiscreto, in the Vienna Burgtheater.
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July 28, 1783: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) and his wife arrive in Salzburg for a stay of three months.
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August 19, 1783: The first child of Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) dies in Vienna at the age of two months. His parents are presently in Salzburg.
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October 26, 1783: The incomplete Mass in c minor K.427 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) is heard for the first time, in St. Peter’s Abbey, Salzburg. Singing one of the soprano parts is the composer’s wife.
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October 27, 1783: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) and his wife leave Salzburg for Linz. He will never see his sister again.
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October 30, 1783: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) and his wife arrive in Linz from Salzburg. They lodge at the home of Count Thun-Hohenstein.
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November 4, 1783: Symphony K.425 “Linz” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) is performed for the first time, in Linz.
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December 22, 1783: Franz Joseph Haydn (51) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (27) meet for possibly the first time, at a Tonkünstler-Societät concert in Vienna where works by both are performed, including the premiere of Mozart’s Misero! o sogno...Aura che intorni spiri K.431, a concert aria for tenor and orchestra.
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February 9, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dates the score to his Piano Concerto no.14 K.449 in Vienna. It is the first entry in his catalogue of musical compositions.
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February 26, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) gives a concert at the Vienna residence of the Russian ambassador, Prince Galitzin. It is the first of 25 concerts he will give between now and April 29.
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March 15, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) gives the first performance of a piano concerto, either K.449 or 450, at the Esterházy residence in Vienna. See 17 March 1784 and 24 March 1784.
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March 17, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) gives the first public performance of a piano concerto, probably K.449, in the Trattner Saal, in the first of three lenten subscription concerts attended by the height of Viennese society.
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March 22, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) premieres one of his piano concertos, probably K.451, at the Esterházy residence in Vienna. See 31 March 1784.
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March 23, 1784: Parts of the Serenade for 13 winds K.361 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) are performed for the first time, at the Burgtheater, Vienna.
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March 24, 1784: In the second of three Lenten subscription concerts, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) gives the first public performance of a piano concerto, probably K.450. See 15 March 1784.
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March 31, 1784: The third and last of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (28) lenten subscription concerts takes place in Vienna. It includes public premieres of his Piano Concerto no.16 K.451 and the Quintet for piano and winds K.452. See 22 March 1784.
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April 24, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) writes to his father from Vienna, “I must tell you that some quartets have just appeared, composed by a certain [Ignaz] Pleyel (26), a pupil of Joseph Haydn (52). If you do not know them, do try and get hold of them; you will find them worth the trouble. They are very well written and most pleasing to listen to.”
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April 29, 1784: The Sonata for keyboard and violin K.454 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is performed for the first time, in Vienna, the composer at the keyboard. The work is probably not completely on paper. Mozart plays much of the piano part out of his head. According to Constanze, Emperor Joseph II saw the blank paper on the piano desk through his opera glasses. Later, he asks Mozart to produce the music and the secret is unveiled to the delight of all.
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June 10, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) brings Giovanni Paisiello (44) to hear one of his Academy Concerts in Vienna. It is a great success.
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June 13, 1784: The Concerto for piano and orchestra no.17 K.453 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is performed for the first time, at the home of Gottfried Ignaz von Ployer, in Döbling. He is the Salzburg agent in Vienna and a relative of the pianist for whom Mozart wrote the concerto, Barbara Ployer. Attending at the composer’s invitation is Giovanni Paisiello (44) on his way to Naples from Russia.
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July 7, 1784: Publication of the Piano Sonatas K.284, 333, and the Violin Sonata K.454 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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August 18, 1784: Publication of the Two-Piano Concerto K.365 and the Piano Variations K.460 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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August 23, 1784: Il re Teodoro in Venezia, a dramma eroicomico by Giovanni Paisiello (44) to words of Casti, is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Burgtheater. The work, commissioned by Emperor Joseph II, is very successful. In the audience is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28), returning Paisiello’s courtesy of 13 June. The opera, especially the libretto, strikes Mozart “like a bolt of lightning.” (Kneppler, 110)
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August 25, 1784: Publication of the Piano Sonatas K.330-332 and the Variations on “Les Hommes Pieusement” K.455 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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August 28, 1784: Publication of three keyboard sonatas K.284, 333, 454 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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September 21, 1784: A second child is born to Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) in Vienna, named Karl Thomas.
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October 14, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dates the score to his Piano Sonata K.457.
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November 17, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dates the score to his String Quartet K.458.
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December 11, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dates the score of his Piano Concerto no.19 K.459 in Vienna.
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December 14, 1784: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) is initiated as an Entered Apprentice at the Freemason Lodge “zur Wohlthätigkeit” in Vienna.
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January 7, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) achieves the second rank of Freemasonry: journeyman at the Lodge “Zur wahren Eintracht.”
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January 10, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dates the score to his String Quartet K.464.
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January 13, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) achieves the rank of Master Mason at the Lodge “Zur wahren Eintracht”, Vienna.
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January 14, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dates the score to his String Quartet K.465.
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January 15, 1785: The six string quartets K.387, 421, 428, 458, 464 and 465 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (28) dedicated to Franz Joseph Haydn (52) are performed for the dedicatee in Mozart’s Vienna home. Mozart finished K.465 just yesterday. (Some sources say only 387, 421, and 458 are performed today) See 12 February 1785.
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February 11, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) makes formal application to join the Tonkunstler-Societät in Vienna. It will come to nothing.
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February 12, 1785: At a party in Vienna given by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) in honor of Franz Joseph Haydn (52), three of the six string quartets dedicated to Haydn are performed, possibly for the first time. Haydn informs Leopold Mozart (65) that “I tell you before God and as an honest man, that your son is the greatest composer I know, either personally or by reputation. He has taste and apart from that, the greatest knowledge of composition.” See 15 January 1785.
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February 13, 1785: Piano Concerto no.18 K.456 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) is performed for the first time, in Vienna, the composer at the keyboard, before Emperor Joseph II and Leopold Mozart (65).
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March 10, 1785: Piano Concerto no.21 K.467 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) is performed for the first time, at the Burgtheater, Vienna.
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March 13, 1785: Davidde penitente K.469, an oratorio by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) to words by da Ponte, is performed for the first time, in the Burgtheater, Vienna.
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March 15, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) applies for a second time for acceptance into the Tonkunstler-Societät, Vienna.
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April 16, 1785: Leopold Mozart (65) achieves the Journeyman Degree of Freemasonry at the Lodge “Zur wahren Eintracht” in Vienna. It is possible that the Lied zur Gesellenreise “Die ihr einem neuen Grade” by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) is premiered on this occasion.
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April 24, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (29) cantata Die Maurerfreude K.471 to words of Petran is performed for the first time, at Lodge “Zur wahren Eintracht”, Vienna.
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May 20, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) dates the score to his Fantasia for piano K.475.
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August 24, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) is informed that his petition of 15 March for acceptance into the Vienna Tonkunstler-Societät has been deferred until he can produce a baptismal certificate. He will never be accepted.
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September 1, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) writes the dedication to the publication of his “Haydn” (53) string quartets (K.387, 421, 428, 458, 464, 465): “A father, having resolved to send his sons into the great world, finds it advisable to entrust them to the protection and guidance of a highly celebrated man, the more so since this man, by a stroke of luck, is his best friend.--Here, then, celebrated man and my dearest friend, are my six sons.”
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September 17, 1785: Publication of the six “Haydn” (53) quartets of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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October 16, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) dates his Piano Quartet K.478.
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November 17, 1785: The Masonic Funeral Music K.477 for winds and strings by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) is performed, possibly for the first time, in memory of Duke Georg August zu Mecklenburg-Strelitz and Count Franz Esterházy von Galántha, in Vienna.
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November 28, 1785: Two vocal ensembles by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) to words of Bertati are performed for the first time, as part of Francesco Bianchi’s La villanella rapita in the Vienna Burgtheater: the quartet Dite almeno in che mancai K.479 and the terzetto Mandina amabile K.480.
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December 11, 1785: Fearing the power of the Masons, Emperor Joseph II reduces the number of Viennese lodges from eight to three. The lodge “Zur gekrönten Hoffnung”, including member Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29), is merged with two others, “Zur Wohlthätigkeit” and “Zu den drei Feurern” to form the new lodge “Zur Neugekrönten Hoffnung.”
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December 16, 1785: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) dates the score to his Piano Concerto no.22 K.482 and his Violin Sonata K.481 in Vienna.
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January 14, 1786: Pursuant to the restructuring of freemasonry, the lodge “Zur Neugekrönten Hoffnung” is opened in Vienna. One of its members, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (29) has written two lieder for the occasion: Zerfliesset heut’, geliebte Brüder K.483 and Ihr unsre neuen Leiter K.484, both to words of von Schloissnig.
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February 7, 1786: For a festival given by Emperor Joseph II in the Orangerie (a hothouse) of Schönbrunn Palace to honor Archduchess Marie-Christine, Governor-General of the Austrian Netherlands and Duke Albert of Sachsen-Teschen, two new stage works are performed. Der Schauspieldirektor K.486, a singspiel by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) to words of Stephanie is premiered at one end of the room, followed by Prima la musica e poi le parole, a divertimento teatrale by Antonio Salieri (35) to words of Casti at the other.
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February 11, 1786: Der Schauspieldirektor K.486, a singspiel by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) to words of Stephanie, is performed publicly for the first time, in the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna.
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March 2, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) dates the score to his Piano Concerto no.23 K.488 in Vienna.
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March 13, 1786: The Scene and Rondo for tenor K.490 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) is performed for the first time, as part of a performance of Idomeneo in the Palace of Prince Karl Auersperg in Vienna.
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April 7, 1786: Piano Concerto no.24 K.491 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) is performed for the first time, at a Vienna subscription concert, the composer at the keyboard. This is Mozart’s last concert in the Burgtheater.
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April 26, 1786: Publication of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (30) Variations on Lison dormait by Nicolas Desède K.264 is announced in the Wiener Zeitung. Also announced is publication of the Keyboard Trios op.40 by Joseph Haydn (54).
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May 1, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (30) opera buffa Le nozze di Figaro K.492 to words of da Ponte after Beaumarchais is performed for the first time, at the Burgtheater, Vienna, the composer directing from the keyboard. The audience is divided. Critics like the work but not the performance.
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June 26, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) dates the score to his Horn Concerto K.495 in Vienna.
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July 8, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) dates the score to his Piano Trio K.496.
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August 1, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) dates the score to his Piano Sonata K.497.
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August 5, 1786: Publication of several works by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung: Variations on Le Bergère Célimène K.359 and Variations on “Hélas, j’ai perdu mon amant” K.360, both for keyboard and violin, Variations on “Dieu d’amour” K.352 for keyboard and Variations on a Theme of Paisiello (46) K.398 for piano.
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August 9, 1786: The Trio for piano, clarinet and viola K.498 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) is performed for the first time, in Vienna, at the home of Professor Nikolaus von Jacquin.
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August 19, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) dates the score to his String Quartet K.499 in Vienna.
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October 18, 1786: A third child is born to Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) in Vienna, Johann Thomas Leopold.
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November 17, 1786: The third child of Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30), Johann Thomas Leopold, is buried a month after he was born.
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December 5, 1786: Piano Concerto no.25 K.503 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) is performed, probably for the first time, in Vienna.
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December 6, 1786: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) completes his Symphony no.38 “Prague” K.504 in Vienna. See 19 January 1787.
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January 17, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) produces his Le nozze di Figaro in Prague to great success.
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January 19, 1787: Two days after a triumphant performance of Le nozze di Figaro in Prague, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (30) gives the first performance of his Symphony K.504 “Prague.” Like the opera, it is very successful.
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February 18, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) and his wife depart Prague for Vienna.
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March 21, 1787: Alcandro, lo confesso...Non sò d’onde viene K.512, a recitative and aria for bass by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) to words of Metastasio, is performed for the first time, in the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna.
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April 7, 1787: Ludwig van Beethoven (16) arrives in Vienna from Bonn. He is in the city for a two-week stay, during which he is supposed to receive instruction from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31). (There is no hard evidence that he ever met Mozart or what their relationship was)
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April 19, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) dates the score to his String Quintet K.515 in Vienna.
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April 24, 1787: The family of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) move into less expensive apartments in Landstraße, Vienna.
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May 16, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) dates the score to his String Quintet K.516 in Vienna.
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June 14, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) dates his Ein musikalischer Spass K.522 for two horns, two violins, viola and bass.
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July 21, 1787: Publication of the Piano Quartet K.493 of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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August 10, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) dates his Serenade K.525 Eine kleine Nachtmusik.
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October 1, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) departs Vienna for Prague to produce Don Giovanni. The opera is still not finished.
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October 4, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) and his wife arrive in Prague to produce Don Giovanni.
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October 24, 1787: Franz Count Orsini-Rosenberg signs a decree appointing Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) Kapellmeister of the Imperial-Royal National Theatre.
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October 29, 1787: Il dissoluto punito, ossia Il Don Giovanni, an opera buffa by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) to words of da Ponte, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Prague. It is an enormous success. Among the audience in Giacomo Casanova. Mozart wrote the overture last night and the orchestra plays it at sight.
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November 13, 1787: After the successful premiere of Don Giovanni, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) and his wife depart Prague for Vienna.
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December 7, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) is appointed Imperial and Royal Chamber Composer to replace Christoph Willibald Gluck (†0). It carries with it a salary of 800 gulden.
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December 7, 1787: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) and his wife arrive back in Vienna from Prague.
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December 19, 1787: The Wiener Zeitung announces publication of Joseph Haydn’s (55) String Quartets op.50, as well as the publication of the Sonata for piano-four hands K.497 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31).
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December 27, 1787: A fourth child is born to Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) in Vienna, named Theresia.
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January 3, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (31) dates the score to his Piano Sonata K.533 in Vienna.
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February 24, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Piano Concerto no.26 K.537 in Vienna.
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March 7, 1788: A month after Emperor Joseph II declared war, the German war song Ich möchte wohl der Kaiser sein K.539 for bass and orchestra by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) to words of Gleim is performed for the first time, in the Leopoldstädtertheater, Vienna.
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April 2, 1788: Publication of three string quintets K.406, 515, 516 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 7, 1788: Through the efforts of Emperor Joseph II, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (32) Don Giovanni is performed in Vienna. At a party following the opera, attended by most of the musical connoisseurs of the city, the work is praised at first, but soon an argument ensues over its shortcomings. When asked for his opinion, Joseph Haydn (56) responds, “I cannot settle the argument. But one thing I know--and that is that Mozart is the greatest composer the world now has.” Mozart is not present.
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June 2, 1788: The aria Un bacio di mano K.541 for bass by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) to words possibly by da Ponte is performed for the first time, in Pasquale Anfossi’s (61) Le gelosie fortunate at the Burgtheater, Vienna.
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June 22, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Piano Trio K.542 in Vienna.
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June 25, 1788: An advertisement appears in the Weiner Zeitung announcing that the publication of three string quintets (K.406, 515, 516) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) will be postponed from 1 July 1788 to 1 January 1789. The sale of subscriptions has been poor.
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June 26, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Symphony no.39 K.543, Piano Sonata K.545, and his String Quartet K.499 in Vienna.
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June 29, 1788: The fourth child of Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32), Theresia, dies in Vienna at the age of six months.
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July 10, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Violin Sonata K.547 in Vienna.
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July 14, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Piano Trio K.548 in Vienna.
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July 25, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Symphony no.40 K.550 in Vienna.
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August 10, 1788: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) dates the score to his Symphony no.41 ”Jupiter” K.551 in Vienna.
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September 27, 1788: Publication of the Trio for piano, clarinet, and viola K.498 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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November 12, 1788: Publication of the Piano Trio K.502 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (32) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 6, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (33) arrangement of Messiah by George Frideric Handel (†29) is premiered at Count Johann Baptist Esterházy’s residence in Vienna, conducted by the arranger.
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March 21, 1789: The Wiener Zeitung announces the publication of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (33) Lieder K.523 and 524 and Six German Dances K.536.
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April 8, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky depart Vienna for Berlin.
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April 10, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky arrive in Prague.
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April 12, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky arrive in Dresden.
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April 13, 1789: The String Trio K.563 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) is performed for the first time, in the Hotel de Pologne, Dresden.
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April 14, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) performs in the private apartments of Electress Amalie von Pfalz-Zweibrücken in Dresden. He plays the piano concerto K.537 and perhaps one of his last three symphonies.
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April 15, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) engages in an impromptu duel with Johann Wilhelm Hässler on the organ of the court church in Dresden, and the piano of Prince Alyeksandr Mikhailovich Beloselsky, the Russian ambassador to Saxony.
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April 18, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky depart Dresden.
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April 20, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky arrive in Leipzig.
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April 22, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) plays the organ in the Thomaskirche, Leipzig, to a large and appreciative audience, without remuneration.
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April 23, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky depart Leipzig for Berlin.
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April 25, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky reach Potsdam.
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May 2, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky travel from Potsdam to Berlin.
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May 8, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky arrive back in Leipzig.
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May 12, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) gives a concert of his music in the Gewandhaus, Leipzig.
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May 17, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky depart Leipzig.
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May 19, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) arrives alone in Berlin.
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May 23, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) hears Johann Nepomuk Hummel (10) play in Berlin.
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May 26, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) gives a private performance before Queen Friederike Luise in Berlin.
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May 28, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) departs Berlin.
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May 31, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) arrives in Prague.
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June 2, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) departs Prague.
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June 4, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) and Prince Karl Lichnowsky arrive back in Vienna.
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July 12, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) sends a letter to his friend and fellow mason Michael Puchberg desperately seeking money. It is one of 19 such letters Mozart writes to Puchberg.
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September 5, 1789: The Wiener Zeitung announces the publication of three works: Joseph Haydn’s (57) Fantasia in C XVII: 4, Das Veilchen K.476, a song for voice and piano by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33), and String Quintet B.285 by Ignaz Pleyel (32).
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September 6, 1789: Alma grande e nobil core K.578, an aria by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) to words of Polomba, is performed for the first time, in Vienna, as part of a revival of I due baroni di Rocca Azzura by Domenico Cimarosa (39).
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September 22, 1789: Austrians and Russians defeat the Turks at Martinesti on the River Rivnik. In honor of the victory, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) will compose a contredanse, Der Sieg vom Helden Koburg K.587.
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November 9, 1789: Two arias by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33), Chi sà, chi sà, qual sia K.582 and Vado, ma dove?--Oh Dei! K.583, both to words of da Ponte, are performed for the first time, in the Burgtheater, Vienna. Both are part of Martin y Soler’s Il burbero di buon cuore.
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December 22, 1789: The Quintet for Clarinet and Strings K.581 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) is performed for the first time, in the Burgtheater, Vienna.
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December 31, 1789: Cosi fan tutte is rehearsed at the home of the composer, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33), probably attended by Joseph Haydn (57).
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January 26, 1790: Cosi fan tutte, ossia La scuola degli amanti K.588, an opera buffa by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart to words of da Ponte, is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Burgtheater on the eve of the composer’s 34th birthday. It is a hit. Among the audience is Franz Joseph Haydn (57).
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February 20, 1790: Emperor Joseph II, Archduke of Austria, King of the Romans, King József II of Hungary, King of Bohemia dies in Vienna. He is succeeded by his brother Grand Duke Leopold of Tuscany as Archduke of Austria and King Lipót II of Hungary. All theatres are closed, thus interrupting the successful run of Cosi fan tutte by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34).
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May 22, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) performs his String Quartets K.575 and 589 at his home in Vienna.
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August 21, 1790: The Wiener Zeitung announces Artaria’s publication of Joseph Haydn’s (58) Arianna a Naxos XXVIb: 2, and the publication of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (34) String Quintet K.516.
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September 11, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (34) duet for soprano and bass, Nun liebes Weibchen, ziehst mit mir K.625 to words of Schikaneder is performed for the first time, in Theater auf der Wieden, Vienna.
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September 23, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) and violinist Franz de Paula Hofer, brother-in-law of his wife, depart Vienna for Frankfurt-am-Main and the coronation of Emperor Leopold II.
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September 28, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) and his brother-in-law, Franz de Paula Hofer, arrive in Frankfurt-am-Main. He hopes to gain from the festivities surrounding the coronation of the new Emperor.
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October 15, 1790: 11:00 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) gives a concert in the Municipal Playhouse, Frankfurt. It is not well attended.
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October 16, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) travels to Mainz from Frankfurt.
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October 20, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) performs before Elector Friedrich Karl Joseph Freiherr von Erthal in Mainz.
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October 21, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) departs Mainz for Mannheim.
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October 25, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) departs Mannheim for Vienna.
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October 29, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) arrives in Munich from Mannheim.
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November 4, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) takes part in a concert in Munich organized by Karl Theodor, Elector of Bavaria for the visiting King Ferdinando IV of Naples and Queen Maria Carolina, sister of Emperor Leopold II.
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November 10, 1790: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) arrives in Vienna from Munich.
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December 14, 1790: A farewell dinner is given for Franz Joseph Haydn (58) in Vienna. Among those present is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34).
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December 15, 1790: Joseph Haydn (58) and Johann Peter Salomon depart Vienna for London. As Haydn and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (34) share a tearful farewell, Mozart says “We are probably saying our last adieu in this life.” Haydn takes this to refer to his own age.
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March 4, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's (35) last public performance, in an academy concert by the clarinettist Joseph Bähr, features the premiere of his Piano Concerto no.27 K.595, the composer at the keyboard. It is the first virtuoso concert in a new hall on the Himmelpfortgasse run by Ignaz Jahn.
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April 12, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) dates the score to his String Quintet K.614 in Vienna.
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April 16, 1791: Antonio Salieri (40) conducts an orchestra of 180 in the Burgtheater,Vienna. It includes a symphony by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35), possibly K.550.
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April 26, 1791: A concerto movement for basset horn K.621b by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) is performed for the first time, at the Prague National Theatre.
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April 28, 1791: The City Magistracy of Vienna decides in favor of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (35) petition to be appointed an unpaid assistant to the current Kapellmeister at St. Stephen’s, Leopold Hoffmann.
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May 9, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) is appointed deputy kapellmeister at St. Stephen’s Cathedral. It is an unpaid position, but he is assured that he will succeed the current kapellmeister in due course.
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June 23, 1791: Ave verum corpus K.618 for chorus, strings and continuo by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) is performed for the first time, in Baden near Vienna.
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July 8, 1791: The impresario Domenico Guardasoni signs a contract with the Bohemian estates to produce an opera for the coronation festivities of Leopold II as King of Bohemia. He will ask Antonio Salieri (40) to write it, but Salieri will refuse. Guardasoni will have to settle for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35).
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July 26, 1791: A sixth child is born to Constanze and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) in Vienna, Franz Xaver Wolfgang.
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August 19, 1791: Adagio in c minor and Rondo in C major for glass harmonica, flute, oboe, viola and cello K.617 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) is performed for the first time, in the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna. It is his last completed work of chamber music.
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August 25, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) departs Vienna for Prague with his wife and secretary, Franz Xaver Süssmayer for the coronation of Emperor Leopold II as King of Bohemia.
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August 28, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35), his wife and secretary arrive in Prague for the coronation of Emperor Leopold II as King of Bohemia.
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September 6, 1791: Emperor Leopold II is crowned King of Bohemia in Prague. The ordinary of the mass is by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35), either K.317 or 337, and conducted by Antonio Salieri (41). Mozart’s opera seria La clemenza di Tito K.621 to words of Mazzolà after Metastasio, is performed for the first time, at the Prague National Theatre, as part of the celebrations surrounding the coronation. The Empress comments that the opera is German hogwash, but successive productions grow in popularity.
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September 11, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35), his wife and secretary return to Vienna from Prague where he produced La Clemenza di Tito.
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September 30, 1791: Two days after the completion of the composition, Die Zauberflöte K.620, a singspiel by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) to words of Schikaneder, is performed for the first time, in Theater auf der Wieden, Vienna, directed by the composer. Disliked by critics, it is very popular with the public.
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October 14, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) writes to his wife that he took their son Carl, his mother-in-law Caecilia Weber, Antonio Salieri (41) and Caterina Cavalieri to see Die Zauberflöte. “They both said it was an operone, worthy to be performed for the grandest festival and before the greatest monarch, and that they would often go to see it, as they had never seen a more beautiful or delightful show. Salieri listened and watched most attentively and from the overture to the last chorus there was not a single number that did not call forth from him a bravo! or bello!” (Anderson, 970)
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October 16, 1791: The Concerto for clarinet and orchestra K.622 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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November 9, 1791: Prince Karl von Lichnowsky files suit in the Lower Austrian provincial court for debt payment of 1,435 florins and 32 kreuzer against Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35). Lichnowsky will drop the suit after Mozart’s death.
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November 15, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) finishes his last completed work, the cantata Laut verkünde unsre Freude K.623.
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November 17, 1791: Laut verkünde unsre Freude K.623, a masonic cantata by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) to words of Schikaneder, is performed for the first time, at Lodge “zur neugekrönten Hoffnung” in Vienna. It is his last completed work. (There is considerable disagreement in the sources, some saying this took place on 18 November)
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November 18, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) appears in public for the last time, at a masonic meeting in Vienna.
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November 20, 1791: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) takes to his bed on about this date with swelling in his hands and feet.
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December 3, 1791: After weeks of swelling limbs and joints, fever and headaches, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) seems to rally from a treatment of cold compresses and bleeding.
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December 4, 1791: Afternoon. From his sickbed, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (35) sings the alto line, of parts of his Requiem. Three friends sing the other parts. (some sources feel this is unlikely) In the evening his fever goes up and he is treated with bleeding cold compresses. This causes shock and then coma.
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December 5, 1791: 00:55 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart dies in his home at 970 Rauhensteingasse in Vienna, Archduchy of Austria, aged 35 years, ten months and eight days. The cause of death is registered as “severe miliary fever” and later diagnosed as “rheumatic inflammatory fever.” The immediate cause is probably two weeks of bleeding and the cold compresses applied a few hours ago.
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December 6, 1791: 14:30 The earthly remains of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart are taken from his apartment to St. Stephen’s Cathedral. Walking in procession are Constanze and her sisters, other members of the Weber family, Baron van Swieten, Mozart’s students, Jacob Freystädtler, Franz Xaver Süssmayr, Otto Hatwig, along with Johann Georg Albrechtsberger (55), Anselm Hüttenbrenner, and Antonio Salieri (41).
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December 7, 1791: Early morning. The mortal remains of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart are laid to rest in St. Marx Churchyard in a third-class (not pauper’s) grave, as is the practice for the vast majority of Viennese citizens. The Wiener Zeitung reports “The Royal and Imperial Kammerkompositeur Wolfgang Mozart died during the night of 4-5 December. From childhood on he was known throughout Europe for his most exceptional musical talent. Through the successful development and diligent application of his extraordinary natural gifts, he scaled the heights of the greatest masters. His works, which are loved and admired everywhere, are proof of his greatness--and they reveal the irreplaceable loss which the noble art of music has suffered through his death.” (Braunbehrens, 406)
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December 10, 1791: A service in memory of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†0) takes place in St. Michael’s Church, Vienna, organized by the directors of the Theater auf der Wieden. Some of his unfinished Requiem is performed, partly orchestrated by unknown hands.
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December 12, 1791: An obituary for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†0) appears in the Musikalisches Wochenblatt in Berlin. It includes the statement “Because his body swelled after death, it is believed that he had been poisoned.” (Hatzinger et.al., 150)
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December 15, 1791: A funeral ceremony in memory of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart takes place in the Nicolai Church, Prague. The number of people desiring to attend far exceeds the space in the church and the square outside.
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December 28, 1791: Publication of the String Quartets K.575, 589, 590 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†0) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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January 1, 1792: Constanze Mozart begins receiving an imperial court pension following at one-third of the salary of her husband, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†0).
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January 25, 1792: A Vienna Masonic lodge announces the publication of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s (†0) Kleine Freimaurer-Kantate K.623 “to assist his distressed widow and orphans.”
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December 21, 1804: The Requiem of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†13) is performed in France for the first time, in Saint-Germain l’Auxerrois, directed by Luigi Cherubini (64).
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June 15, 1809: A great service is held in memory of Franz Joseph Haydn in the Schottenkirche, Vienna. The Requiem of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†17) is performed. The occupying French army sends an honor guard.
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December 19, 1819: The Requiem of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†28) is performed for the first time in Brazil, in Rio de Janeiro.
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May 23, 1824: Shortly after Antonio Salieri (73) cuts his own throat in a suicide attempt, Calisto Bassi begins passing out printed copies of his poem “A Lodovico van Beethoven Ode Alcaica.” In it, Bassi makes the first claim that Salieri poisoned Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†32). Vienna police quickly confiscate as many copies as they can find.
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June 25, 1824: Two nurses who have attended Antonio Salieri (73) since the winter of 1823 sign a declaration that at no time did their patient confess to killing Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†32).
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June 5, 1825: The two nurses who attended Antonio Salieri (†0) reassert their claim that since the winter of 1823, at no time did their patient confess to killing Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†32).
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April 3, 1827: A memorial service for Ludwig van Beethoven takes place in the Church of Augustinerkirche, Vienna. The Requiem of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†35) is performed.
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January 27, 1856: In Vienna, Franz Liszt (44) conducts performances of music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†64) on the 100th anniversary of Mozart’s birth.
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January 27, 1866: Zaide, a singspiel by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†74) to words of Schachtner after Sebastiani, is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt, on the 110th anniversary of the composer’s birth.
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March 11, 1869: The funeral in memory of Hector Berlioz takes place at L’Église de la Trinité, Paris. The procession to the church is led by Adolphe Sax who directs the National Guard band in Berlioz’ Symphonie funèbre. Illustrious attenders include Daniel Auber (87), Ambroise Thomas (57), and Charles Gounod (50). The music features works of Christoph Willibald Gluck (†81), Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†77), Ludwig van Beethoven (†41), Luigi Cherubini (†26), and the Hostias from Berlioz’ own Requiem. The mortal remains of Louis-Hector Berlioz are laid to rest in Montmartre next to those of his two wives, Harriet Smithson and Marie Recio.
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February 12, 1998: Zwei Räthsel von W.A.M. for soprano, alto, viola, cello, percussion, tape, and live electronics by Olga Neuwirth (29), to words of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†206) and Leopold Mozart (†210), is performed for the first time, in Venice.
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September 26, 2006: The Deutsche Oper cancels a performance of Idomeneo by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (†214) in Berlin.  This production features the severed heads of Jesus Christ, Buddha, Mohammed, and Poseidon.  Police warned the opera company that such a depiction would cause enormous security risks.