A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Gian Francesco Malipiero

Birth icon
March 18, 1882: Gian Francesco Malipiero is born in Venice, Kingdom of Italy, the first of three children born to Luigi Malipiero, a pianist and conductor, and Countess Emma Balbi.
Performance icon
May 15, 1913: The first set of Impressioni dal vero for orchestra by Gian Francesco Malipiero (31) is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan.
Performance icon
May 29, 1913: Le Sacre du Printemps, a ballet by Igor Stravinsky (30) to a scenario of Roerich, is performed for the first time, at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris. The ballet and its music cause a riot in the theatre as proponents and opponents resort to fisticuffs to exchange opinions on the value of art. The dancers perform to music that they have to imagine, as few in the auditorium can hear it, except during certain lulls. The choreographer, Vaclav Nizhinsky, almost runs onto the stage from the wings but is physically restrained by the composer. Sergey Diaghilev, the impresario, flicks the lights several times in an effort to douse the demonstrations. Nothing works. Those participating in the discussions include Maurice Ravel (38) and Florent Schmitt (42). Camille Saint-Saëns (77) simply repeats “he’s mad, he’s mad” several times before walking out. In the audience is a young composer named Gian Francesco Malipiero (31) who was encouraged to attend by Alfredo Casella (29). “I awoke from a long and dangerous lethargy.” He decides to disown all his previous work and strike out anew. Daniel Chennevière (Dane Rudhyar) (18) calls it “a tremendous experience.”
Performance icon
January 24, 1914: Canossa, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (31) to words of Benco, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Costanzi, Rome.
Performance icon
March 11, 1917: The Fountains of Rome, a tone poem by Ottorino Respighi (37), is performed for the first time, at the Teatro Augusteo, Rome. Also premiered is the second set of Impressioni dal vero for orchestra of Gian Francesco Malipiero (34).
Event icon
March 16, 1917: The new Società Nazionale di Musica gives its first concert in the Accademia Santa Cecilia in Rome. The society is organized by Alfredo Casella (33) and includes Ottorino Respighi (37) and Gian Francesco Malipiero (34). It will soon change its name to Società Italiana di Musica Moderna.
Performance icon
January 27, 1918: The first part of Pause del silenzio for orchestra by Gian Francesco Malipiero (35) is performed for the first time, in Teatro Augusteo, Rome. It is well received by the audience.
Performance icon
April 15, 1918: I selvaggi, a puppet ballet by Gian Francesco Malipiero (36) to a story by Depero, is performed for the first time, in Teatro dei Piccoli, Rome.
Performance icon
October 11, 1919: Ditirambo tragico for orchestra by Gian Francesco Malipiero (37) is performed for the first time, in London.
Performance icon
July 10, 1920: Sette canzoni, seven “dramatic expressions” by Gian Francesco Malipiero (38) to his own words after several earlier Italian poets, is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra.
Performance icon
March 16, 1921: String Quartet no.1 “Rispetti e strambotti” by Gian Francesco Malipiero (38) is performed for the first time, in Rome.
Death icon
May 28, 1921: Gian Francesco Malipiero’s (39) first wife, Maria Rosa, dies. The death keenly affects him, even though the two are estranged.
Performance icon
March 29, 1922: San Francesco d’Assisi, a mistero by Gian Francesco Malipiero (40) to words of St. Francis and Jacopo da Todi, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in Carnegie Hall, New York. See 22 September 1949.
Event icon
April 27, 1922: Gian Francesco Malipiero (40) marries his second wife, Anna Wright. It is possible that this marriage will never be consummated, but she will provide a steadying influence in his life despite his mistresses.
Performance icon
October 19, 1924: La mascherata delle principesse prigionere, a dramma sinfonico by Gian Francesco Malipiero (42) to a story by Prunières, is performed for the first time, in Théâtre de la Monnaie, Brussels.
Performance icon
November 5, 1925: Orfeo, ovvero L’ottava canzone, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (43) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Düsseldorf Stadtsoper.
Performance icon
March 24, 1926: Tre commedie goldoniane, a triptych by Gian Francesco Malipiero (44) to his own words after Goldoni, is performed for the first time, in the Hessisches Landestheater, Darmstadt.
Event icon
April 19, 1926: Gian Francesco Malipiero (44) writes to Benito Mussolini lauding fascism and offering his services to bring music into line.
Performance icon
March 8, 1928: Il finto Arlecchino, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (45) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Mainz Stadttheater.
Performance icon
March 21, 1928: Filomela e l’infatuato, a dramma musicale by Gian Francesco Malipiero (46) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Deutsches Theater, Prague.
Event icon
June 5, 1930: Gian Francesco Malipiero (48) has his first audience with Benito Mussolini, in Rome. He brings scores of 47 of his compositions, four of his books, ten volumes of the Monteverdi (†286) edition he has been overseeing, and five of his arrangements of early music.
Performance icon
May 15, 1931: Torneo notturno, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (49) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Nationaltheater, Munich.
Performance icon
September 6, 1932: Pantea, a dramma sinfonico by Gian Francesco Malipiero (50) to his own story, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Goldoni, Venice. Also premiered is La favola d’Orfeo, a chamber opera by Alfredo Casella (49) to words of Pavolini after Poliziano.
Performance icon
December 15, 1932: Two operas by Gian Francesco Malipiero (50) to his own words are performed for the first time, in the Coburg Landestheater: Le aquile di Aquileia and I corvi di San Marco.
Event icon
December 28, 1932: Gian Francesco Malipiero (50) has a personal audience with Benito Mussolini. He gets the impression Mussolini supports him in the current modernist-romantic controversy. See 17 December 1932.
Event icon
March 31, 1933: Acciaio, a film with music by Gian Francesco Malipiero (51), is released in Italy.
Performance icon
January 13, 1934: La favola del figlio cambiato, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (51) to words of Pirandello, is performed for the first time, in the Brunswick Landestheater.
Performance icon
August 1, 1934: Merlino, mastro d’organi, a dramma musicale by Gian Francesco Malipiero (52) to his own words, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Rome Radio. See 28 March 1972.
Performance icon
February 8, 1936: Giulio Cesare, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (53) to his own words after Shakespeare, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Carlo Felice, Genoa.
Event icon
October 30, 1937: Gian Francesco Malipiero (55) is awarded the Coolidge Medal by the Library of Congress, Washington.
Performance icon
November 6, 1937: Il festino, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (55) to his own words after de Rossi, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Turin Radio. See 2 October 1954.
Performance icon
June 4, 1938: Antonio e Cleopatra, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (56) to his own words after Shakespeare, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Comunale, Florence.
Performance icon
January 11, 1941: Ecuba, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (58) to his own words after Euripedes, is performed for the first time, in Rome. It uses music from his incidental music to the play.
Performance icon
October 24, 1942: I capricci di Callot, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (60) to his own words after Hoffmann, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Reale dell’Opera, Rome.
Performance icon
June 30, 1943: La vita è sogno, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (61) to his own words after Calderón, is performed for the first time, in the Opernhaus, Breslau (Wroclaw).
Performance icon
June 21, 1946: Vergilii Aeneis, a sinfonia eroica by Gian Francesco Malipiero (64) to his own words after Virgil (tr. Caro), is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of RAI. See 6 January 1958.
Performance icon
February 27, 1948: Symphony no.4 “In Memoriam” by Gian Francesco Malipiero (65) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
Performance icon
June 20, 1949: Stradivario, a ballet by Gian Francesco Malipiero (67) to his own story, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in Teatro Pergola, Florence. See 3 June 1958.
Performance icon
September 22, 1949: San Francesco d’Assisi, a mistero by Gian Francesco Malipiero (67) to words of St. Francis and Jacopo da Todi, is staged for the first time, in Perugia. See 29 March 1922.
Performance icon
January 12, 1950: Mondi celesti e infernali, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (67) to his own words after Shakespeare, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of RAI. See 2 February 1961.
Performance icon
May 4, 1950: L’allegra brigata, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (68) to his own words after Sacchetti, is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan.
Performance icon
December 16, 1951: El mondo novo, a ballet by Gian Francesco Malipiero (69) to his own story after Tiepolo, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in Teatro Argentina, Rome.
Performance icon
January 25, 1953: Il figliuol prodigo, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (70) to his own words after Castellano Castellani, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of RAI. See 14 May 1957.
Performance icon
October 2, 1954: Il festino, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (72) to his own words after de Rossi, is staged for the first time, in Teatro Donizetti, Bergamo. Also premiered is Malipiero’s Donna Urraca to his own words after Mérimée. See 6 November 1937.
Performance icon
May 14, 1957: Il figliuol prodigo, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (75) to his own words after Castellano Castellani, is staged for the first time, in Teatro della Pergola, Florence. Also premiered is Malipiero’s Venere prigioniera to his own words after Gonzales. See 25 January 1953.
Performance icon
January 6, 1958: Vergilii Aeneis, a sinfonia eroica by Gian Francesco Malipiero (75) to his own words after Virgil (tr. Caro), is staged for the first time, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice. See 21 June 1946.
Performance icon
June 3, 1958: Stradivario, a ballet by Gian Francesco Malipiero (76) to his own story, is staged for the first time, in Dortmund. See 20 June 1949.
Performance icon
February 2, 1961: Mondi celesti e infernali, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (78) to his own words after Shakespeare, is staged for the first time, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice. See 12 January 1950.
Performance icon
April 20, 1962: Rappresentazione e festa di Carnasciale e della Quaresima, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (80) to his own words after a 16th century Florentine text, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice. See 20 January 1970.
Performance icon
March 16, 1963: Il capitan Spavento, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (80) to his own words after Ruzante and de Fatouville, is performed for the first time, in Teatro San Carlo, Naples.
Performance icon
September 21, 1963: Don Giovanni, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (81) to his own words after Pushkin, is performed for the first time, in the Auditorium della RAI, Naples.
Performance icon
October 4, 1963: Sogno d’un tramonto d’autunno, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (81) to words of D’Annunzio, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of RAI, 50 years after it was composed. See 4 October 1988.
Death icon
March 6, 1964: Anna Wright, the second wife of Gian Francesco Malipiero (81) dies after 30 months of a degenerative illness which included arterial sclerosis, insanity, and paralysis.
Performance icon
September 4, 1966: Le metamorfosi di Bonaventura, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (84) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice.
Performance icon
February 7, 1969: Gli eroi di Bonaventura, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (86) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Piccola Scala, Milan. It is a collection of music from his earlier operas.
Performance icon
October 22, 1969: Il marescalco, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (87) to his own words after Aretino, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Comunale, Treviso.
Performance icon
January 20, 1970: Rappresentazione e festa di Carnasciale e della Quaresima, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (87) to his own words after a 16th century Florentine text, is staged for the first time, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice. Also premiered is Malipiero’s Don Tartufo Bacchettone to his own words after Molière and Gigli. See 20 April 1962.
Performance icon
August 28, 1971: Two operas by Gian Francesco Malipiero (89) to his own words are performed for the first time, in Teatro dei Rinnuovati, Siena: Uno dei dieci and L’Iscariota.
Performance icon
March 28, 1972: Merlino, mastro d’organi, a dramma musicale by Gian Francesco Malipiero (90) to his own words, is staged for the first time, in Palermo, 45 years after it was composed. See 1 August 1934.
Death icon
August 1, 1973: Gian Francesco Malipiero dies in Treviso City Hospital, Republic of Italy, of a heart ailment, aged 91 years, four months, and 14 days.
Event icon
October 4, 1988: Sogno d’un tramonto d’autunno, an opera by Gian Francesco Malipiero (†15) to words of D’Annunzio, is staged for the first time, in Mantua, 75 years after it was composed. See 4 October 1963.