A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Otto Luening

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June 15, 1900: Otto Clarence Luening is born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, one of seven children born to Eugene Luening, a pianist, singer, and composer, and Emma Jacobs, an amateur singer, whose father was a banker, singer, and state senator.
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October 17, 1913: Otto Luening (13) has his first flute lesson, with Professor Schellhorn, in Munich.
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March 27, 1916: Otto Luening (15) makes his concert debut as a flutist, in Munich.
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February 3, 1917: Because of the actions of the American government today, Otto Luening (16) is expelled from the Royal Academy of Music in Munich before the assembled student body. They give him polite applause as he leaves.
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April 9, 1917: Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov (Lenin) and about 30 followers depart Zürich for Russia from the main railroad station. As a small crowd jeers them they sing the Internationale. Among another group of onlookers is an American music student, Otto Luening (16).
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February 1, 1919: A production of GK Chesterton’s Magic opens in Zürich with Otto Luening (18) playing the young lead.
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March 10, 1919: James Joyce’s English Players’ production of The Heather Field by Edward Martyn opens in Zürich. Playing the 40-year-old Irish doctor is Otto Luening (18).
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May 26, 1919: A production of Oliver Goldsmith’s She Stoops to Conquer by James Joyce’s English Players opens in Zürich. In the role of Tony Lumpkin is Otto Luening (18).
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April 30, 1921: Sextet for winds and strings by Otto Luening (20) is performed for the first time, in Zürich. Press and public respond enthusiastically.
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July 17, 1921: Introitus for organ by Otto Luening (21) is performed for the first time at Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana.
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February 14, 1922: String Quartet no.1 by Otto Luening (21) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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June 1, 1922: The Chicago Musical Arts Studio opens, supported by nine society ladies and with Otto Luening as director (21).
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October 26, 1922: Trio for violin, cello, and piano by Otto Luening (22) is performed for the first time, in Chicago. Reviews are mixed.
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February 19, 1924: Two works by Otto Luening (23) are performed for the first time, in Chicago: Sonatina for flute and piano, the composer playing flute, and Three songs for soprano and piano or small orchestra to words of Hesse and Sharpe, the composer at the keyboard.
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November 25, 1925: Symphonic Fantasia no.1 for orchestra by Otto Luening (25) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York, Howard Hanson (29) conducting.
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January 15, 1926: Incidental music to Maeterlinck’s (tr. Horgan) play Sister Beatrice by Otto Luening (25) is performed for the first time, at the Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York.
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April 19, 1927: Otto Luening (26) marries Ethel Codd, a professional vocalist from Canada.
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January 12, 1928: Serenade for three horns and string orchestra by Otto Luening (27) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York.
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March 23, 1930: The John Simon Guggenheim Foundations fellowships are announced, including ones for Ruth Crawford (28) and Otto Luening (29).
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March 29, 1931: The John Simon Guggenheim Foundations fellowships are announced, including ones for Otto Luening (30) and Henry Cowell (34).
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January 30, 1935: Concertino for flute and chamber orchestra by Otto Luening (34) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia the composer as soloist.
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April 11, 1936: Two Symphonic Interludes for orchestra by Otto Luening (35) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York. Press and public are very pleased.
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June 4, 1936: Otto Luening (35) writes to Henry Cowell (39) offering assistance during his ongoing legal struggle.
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September 12, 1936: Fantasia Brevis for clarinet and piano by Otto Luening (36) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York.
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February 1, 1937: Prelude to a Hymn Tune by William Billings for orchestra by Otto Luening (36) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York, the composer conducting.
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March 18, 1937: Vocalise for soprano, flute, and piano by Henry Cowell (40) is performed for the first time, at Town Hall, New York. The dedicatees, Ethel and Otto Luening (36), perform the voice and flute parts respectively.
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September 12, 1937: Suite for string orchestra by Otto Luening (37) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York.
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September 19, 1937: String Quartet no.3 by Otto Luening (37) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York.
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December 1, 1940: Incidental music to Garcia Lorca’s play Blood Wedding by Otto Luening (40) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont.
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August 10, 1941: First Concerto for Flute and Percussion by Lou Harrison (24) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont by Otto Luening (41), Henry Cowell (44), and Frank Wigglesworth.
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October 22, 1942: Harry Partch (41) begins two days of lecture-recitals at Bennington College with Otto Luening (42).
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February 13, 1944: The Soundless Song for soprano, chamber ensemble, dancers, and lights by Otto Luening (43) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the New York Public Library, 21 years after it was composed. The premiere is an arrangement for soprano and piano. Also premiered is Luening’s Gliding O’er All for voice and piano to words of Whitman.
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March 12, 1944: Two-Bits for flute and piano by Henry Cowell (47) is performed for the first time, at the Brooklyn Museum. Otto Luening (43) plays the flute part. Also premiered is Cowell’s three part songs for female voices American Muse.
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February 15, 1946: Dance Sonata for piano by Otto Luening (45) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of radio station WNYC, New York.
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March 3, 1946: Coal Scuttle Blues for two pianos by Otto Luening (45) is performed for the first time, in Times Hall, New York.
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May 8, 1946: The Medium, an opera by Gian-Carlo Menotti (34) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in New York, at the Brander Matthews Theatre of Columbia University, conducted by Otto Luening (45).
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September 14, 1946: Warble for Lilac-Time for high voice and piano or small orchestra by Elliott Carter (37) to words of Whitman, is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York. Also premiered are two works for chamber orchestra by Otto Luening (46): Pilgrim’s Hymn and Prelude.
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May 7, 1947: The Mother of Us All, an opera by Virgil Thomson (50) to words of Stein, is performed for the first time, in Brander Matthews Hall, Columbia University, New York, conducted by Otto Luening (46).
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May 5, 1948: Evangeline, an opera by Otto Luening (47) to his own words after Longfellow, is performed for the first time, at Brander Matthews Theatre, Columbia University, New York conducted by the composer.
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February 6, 1951: Sonata for violin and piano no.3 by Otto Luening (50) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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April 3, 1951: Two songs for voice and piano by Otto Luening (50) to words of Byron are performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York: The Harp the Monarch Minstrel Swept and She Walks in Beauty.
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July 1, 1951: Legend for oboe and strings by Otto Luening (51) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of radio station WNYC, New York.
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August 15, 1951: Three Nocturnes for oboe and piano by Otto Luening (51) are performed for the first time, in Bennington, Vermont, the composer at the piano.
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August 21, 1951: Dickinson Song Cycle for voice and piano by Otto Luening (51) is performed for the first time, privately, in Bennington, Vermont. See 11 December 1951.
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August 23, 1951: Intermezzo for piano and orchestra by Vladimir Ussachevsky (39) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont conducted by Otto Luening (51).
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December 11, 1951: Dickinson Song Cycle for voice and piano by Otto Luening (51) is performed publicly for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York. See 21 August 1951.
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March 5, 1952: Kentucky Concerto by Otto Luening (51) is performed for the first time, in Louisville, the composer conducting.
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October 28, 1952: The first public “concert” of tape-recorder music in the United States takes place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. It is given by the Columbia University electronic music group and includes premieres of Sonic Contours for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (41) and three works for flute on tape by Otto Luening: Fantasy in Space, Invention in Twelve Tones, and Low Speed . The flutist in all three Luening pieces is the composer. The performance is broadcast by radio stations WNYC New York and WGBH Boston. A Tanglewood student named Luciano Berio (27) is present and is fascinated. Also premiered is Eight Studies and a Fantasy for flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon by Elliott Carter (43).
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October 25, 1953: Incantation for tape by Otto Luening (53) and Vladimir Ussachevsky is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Columbia Broadcasting System, originating in New York.
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March 20, 1954: Rhapsodic Variations for orchestra and electronic tape by Otto Luening (53) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (42) is performed for the first time, in Louisville.  It is perhaps the first instance of a concert involving tape and orchestra.
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March 28, 1954: Wisconsin Suite for orchestra by Otto Luening (53) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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August 16, 1954: Of Identity, a ballet with music by Otto Luening (54) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (42), is performed for the first time, privately in Westport, Connecticut. See 9 February 1955.
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November 18, 1954: A Poem in Cycles and Bells for tape and orchestra by Otto Luening (54) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (43) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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February 9, 1955: Of Identity, a ballet by Otto Luening (54) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (43), is performed publicly for the first time, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York.
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January 12, 1956: Incidental music for Shakespeare’s play King Lear by Marc Blitzstein (50), with electronic sounds by Otto Luening (55) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (44), is performed for the first time, in New York City Center in a production directed by and starring Orson Welles. It is a disaster. Welles has injured both legs in separate incidents and is consigned to a wheel chair. It will see 21 performances.
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April 20, 1956: Two works are performed for the first time, in Juilliard Concert Hall, New York: Theatre Piece no.2 for tape, piano, voice, narrator, percussion, and winds by Otto Luening (55), and Meditation on Ecclesiastes for strings by Norman Dello Joio (43). See 6 May 1957.
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January 22, 1957: Suite for bass and piano by Otto Luening (56) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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March 18, 1957: Trio for flute, violin, and soprano by Otto Luening (56) without words is performed for the first time, in New York 33 years after it was composed.
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February 2, 1958: Sonata for cello solo no.2 composed in Two Dayturnes by Otto Luening (57) is performed for the first time, in Kaufmann Concert Hall, New York.
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March 26, 1958: Incidental music to Shaw’s play Back to Methuselah by Otto Luening (57) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (46) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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June 5, 1958: Incidental music to Meredith’s play Ulysses in Nighttown for electronic sound generators by Otto Luening (57) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (46) is performed for the first time, in the Rooftop Theatre, New York.
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December 20, 1958: Columbia University’s Alice M. Ditson Fund Advisory Committee, which includes Otto Luening (58), allocates $10,000 for two performances of Harry Partch’s (57) The Bewitched next April.
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February 20, 1959: The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center comes into existence with the beginning of a grant of $175,000 to the two universities. The directors are Otto Luening (58) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (47) at Columbia, and Milton Babbitt (42) and Roger Sessions (62) at Princeton.
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April 18, 1959: Fantasia for string quartet and orchestra by Otto Luening (58) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University.
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September 5, 1959: Otto Luening (59) marries his second wife, Catherine Johnson Brunson at her family home in Elba, Alabama. She is a pianist and musicologist at Columbia University.
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March 26, 1960: Concerted Piece for tape recorder and orchestra by Otto Luening (59) and Vladimir Ussachevsky (48) is performed for the first time, in New York, conducted by Leonard Bernstein (41). This is a taped “Young People’s Concert” which will be aired tomorrow. The official premiere will take place on 31 March.
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April 30, 1960: Sonata for violin solo no.1 by Otto Luening (59) is performed for the first time, in Kaufmann Concert Hall, New York.
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April 4, 1961: A funeral service in memory of Wallingford Riegger is held at the Riverside Funeral Chapel on Amsterdam Avenue and 76th Street in New York.  Otto Luening (60) delivers the eulogy.  His earthly remains will be laid to rest at Ferncliff Cemetery, Hartsdale, New York.
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May 9, 1961: The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center gives its inaugural concert before an invited audience in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University. Gargoyles for violin solo and synthesized sound by Otto Luening (60) is performed for the first time, as are the Prologue and Interlude from The Creation for mezzo-soprano, two choruses, and tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (49). See 19 May 1971.
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April 30, 1962: A Day in the Country for violin and tape by Otto Luening (61) is performed for the first time, in Kaufmann Concert Hall, New York.
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May 6, 1962: Rondo for accordion by Otto Luening (61) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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May 15, 1962: Sonority Canon for Four Solo Flutes Accompanied by 33 Flutes on Tape by Otto Luening (61) is performed for the first time, at Columbia University, New York.
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June 23, 1962: Electronic Fanfare for percussion, recorder, and electronically generated sounds by Otto Luening (62) and Halim El-Dabh is performed for the first time, in Spoleto.
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October 22, 1962: Trio for flute, cello, and piano by Otto Luening (62) is performed for the first time, in New York. Charles Wuorinen (24) plays the piano part.
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October 22, 1963: Synthesis for orchestra and electronic sound by Otto Luening (63) is performed for the first time, in Erie, Pennsylvania.
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February 7, 1964: Elegy for violin by Otto Luening (63) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 8, 1964: Duo for violin and viola by Otto Luening (63) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 7, 1964: Suite for High and Low Instruments by Otto Luening (63) is performed for the first time, at the Chapin School, New York.
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October 25, 1964: Lyric Scene for flute and strings by Otto Luening (64) is performed for the first time, in Arlington, Virginia.
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May 9, 1965: Fanfare for a Fellow Composer for brass and percussion by Otto Luening (64) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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December 13, 1965: String Quartet no.2 by Otto Luening (65) is performed for the first time, at Columbia University, 42 years after it was composed.
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December 15, 1965: A concert in memory of Edgar Varèse takes place in the McMillin Theatre of Columbia University. The provost, Jacques Barzun delivers a brief address as does Otto Luening (65). Some film of Thomas Bouchard is shown as well as a recording of recent remarks by Varèse. Charles Wuorinen (27) directs a performance of Varèse’s Octandre. Density 21.5 is performed. Excerpts from Déserts are played as well as Poème électronique, adapted for the occasion by Vladimir Ussachevsky (54).
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December 18, 1966: Trio for three flutists by Otto Luening (66) is performed for the first time, in New York. The composer plays one part.
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February 27, 1967: Suite for flute solo no.4 by Otto Luening (66) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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August 12, 1968: Six Proverbs for voice and piano by Otto Luening (68) is performed for the first time, in Lincoln Center, New York.
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May 21, 1970: Sonata for violin solo no.2 by Otto Luening (69) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 7, 1971: Two works are performed for the first time, in Kaufmann Concert Hall, 92nd Street Y, New York: Chamber Concerto for tuba by Charles Wuorinen (32) the composer conducting, and Otto Luening’s (70) Sonata for violin solo no.3.
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November 28, 1971: Fugue for organ by Otto Luening (71) is performed for the first time, in the National Cathedral, Washington.
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January 25, 1972: Eight Tone Poems for Two Violas by Otto Luening (71) is performed for the first time, in Albany, New York.
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March 13, 1972: Introduction and Allegro for trumpet and piano by Otto Luening (71) is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music, New York.
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July 19, 1972: Variations on Fugue and Chorale Fantasy for organ and electronic tape by Otto Luening (72) is performed for the first time, in Hertz Hall of the University of California at Berkeley.
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October 14, 1973: Sonority Forms no.1 for orchestra by Otto Luening (73) is performed for the first time, in North Bennington, Vermont.
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November 17, 1975: Sonata for piano by Otto Luening (75) is performed for the first time, in Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York 20 years after it was composed.
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January 4, 1976: A Wisconsin Symphony for orchestra by Otto Luening (75) is performed for the first time, in Milwaukee.
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November 21, 1977: Short Sonata for flute and piano by Otto Luening (77) is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music, New York.
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May 23, 1978: Music for Orchestra by Otto Luening (77) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York conducted by Gunther Schuller, 55 years after it was composed.
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April 13, 1980: Potawatomi Legends for chamber orchestra by Otto Luening (79) is performed for the first time, at the University of Wisconsin at Parkside, Kenosha.
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August 13, 1980: Symphonic Interlude no.3 for orchestra by Otto Luening (80) is performed for the first time, at Tanglewood in Lenox, Massachusetts conducted by Gunther Schuller.
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November 20, 1980: Short Sonatas for piano nos.5, 6, and 7 by Otto Luening (80) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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January 26, 1982: Symphonic Fantasia no.3 for orchestra by Otto Luening (81) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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February 24, 1982: Fantasia for violin, cello, and piano by Otto Luening (81) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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February 28, 1982: Short Symphony by Otto Luening (81) is performed for the first time, in Milwaukee, Lukas Foss (59) directing.
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May 8, 1982: Sonority Forms no.1 for piano by Otto Luening (81) is performed for the first time, at the Music School at Rivers, Weston, Massachusetts.
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May 24, 1983: Ten Canons for Two Flutes by Otto Luening (82) is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music, New York.
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June 4, 1983: Sonority Forms II by Otto Luening (82) is performed for the first time, in Bennington, Vermont.
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May 4, 1984: Lines from The First Book of Urizen and Vala, or a Dream of Nine Nights for solo voices and chorus by Otto Luening (83) to words of Blake is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 14, 1984: Symphonic Fantasia no.4 by Otto Luening (83) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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October 31, 1984: Fantasia and Dance in memoriam Max Pollikoff for violin by Otto Luening (84) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont.
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February 24, 1985: Three canons for two flutes by Otto Luening (84) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 30, 1985: Opera Fantasia for violin and piano by Otto Luening (84) is performed for the first time, in Charleston, South Carolina.
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September 19, 1985: Serenade and Dialogue for flute and piano by Otto Luening (85) is performed for the first time, at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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February 28, 1986: Symphonic Fantasia no.6 by Otto Luening (85) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University.
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September 30, 1986: Two songs for voice and piano by Otto Luening (86) to words of Blake are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York: Ah! Sunflower and The Lily .
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February 20, 1987: Symphonic Fantasia nos.7&8 by Otto Luening (86) are performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 24, 1987: Song Without Words for piano by Otto Luening (86) is performed for the first time, in Buffalo.
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May 31, 1987: Suite for Horn by Otto Luening (86) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 13, 1987: Suite for Baroque Flute by Otto Luening (87) is performed for the first time, at Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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August 6, 1988: Green Mountain Evening for flute, oboe, clarinet, two cellos, and piano by Otto Luening (88) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont.
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March 30, 1989: Symphonic Fantasia no.5 by Otto Luening (88) is performed for the first time, in Milwaukee, directed by Lukas Foss (66).
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September 2, 1996: Otto Clarence Luening dies in New York, USA, aged 96 years, two months, and 18 days.