A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Ernst Krenek

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August 23, 1900: Ernst Krenek is born at Argauergasse 3 in Vienna, Austro-Hungarian Empire, the only child of Ernst Josef Krenek, an officer in the Quartermaster Corps, and Emanuela Josefa Auguste Cizek, the daughter of an army officer.
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March 15, 1918: World War I: Ernst Krenek (17) reports for military service and is posted to the 13th Imperial-Royal Heavy Field Artillery Regiment of the Austro-Hungarian army.
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May 14, 1918: Doppelfuge op.1a for piano by Ernst Krenek (17) is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Staatsakademie für Musik und Darstellende Kunst. This is the first public performance of a Krenek work.
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May 3, 1920: Piano Sonata no.1 by Ernst Krenek (19) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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February 8, 1921: Serenade op.4 for clarinet, violin, viola, and cello by Ernst Krenek (20) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 16, 1921: String Quartet no.1 by Ernst Krenek (20) is performed for the first time, in Nürnberg. The work is a sensation, mostly negative.
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June 21, 1921: In a concert of students of Franz Schreker (43) in the Konzertsaal of the Staatliche Akademische Hochschule für Musik, Ernst Krenek’s (20) Sonata for violin and piano op.3 is performed for the first time, the composer at the keyboard.
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March 17, 1922: The Symphony no.1 of Ernst Krenek (21) is performed for the first time, in Berlin. It proves an “immense success.”
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April 24, 1922: The String Quartet no.2 by Ernst Krenek (21) is performed for the first time, in the Berlin Singakademie.
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July 30, 1922: Symphonic Music for Nine Solo Instruments by Ernst Krenek (21) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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August 19, 1922: Concerto Grosso no.1 by Ernst Krenek (21) is performed for the first time, in the Weimarer Staatskapelle.
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October 16, 1922: Two piano works by Ernst Krenek (22) are performed for the first time, in Berlin: Toccata und Chaconne über den Choral Ja ich glaub an Jesum Christum and Eine kleine Suite von Stücken über denselbigen Choral, verschiedenen charakters.
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June 11, 1923: Symphony no.2 by Ernst Krenek (22) is performed for the first time, in Kassel.
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August 3, 1923: String Quartet no.3 by Ernst Krenek (22) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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August 15, 1923: The first Bauhaus festival opens in Weimar. Concerts over the next six weeks will include music by Igor Stravinsky (41), Feruccio Busoni (67), Ernst Krenek (22), and Paul Hindemith (27).
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December 19, 1923: Piano Concerto no.1 op.18 by Ernst Krenek (23) is performed for the first time, in Winterthur.
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January 15, 1924: Ernst Krenek (23) marries Anna Mahler, a painter and the daughter of Gustav Mahler (†13), at Vienna City Hall. They will separate before the year is out.
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February 1, 1924: Symphonische Musik no.2 for chamber orchestra by Ernst Krenek (23) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 9, 1924: Der Sprung über den Schatten op.17, a comic opera by Ernst Krenek (23) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Frankfurt-am-Main Opera House. The public is moderately pleased but the critics are mixed, finding particular fault with the libretto.
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August 5, 1924: String Quartet no.4 by Ernst Krenek (23) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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October 14, 1924: Concerto grosso no.2 by Ernst Krenek (24) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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October 20, 1924: Die Zwingburg op.14, a scenic cantata by Ernst Krenek (24) to words of Werfel after Demuth, is performed for the first time, at the Berlin Staatsoper, in the presence of President Friedrich Ebert. Critics are enthusiastic but the public is lukewarm.
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December 12, 1924: Two Piano Suites op.26 by Ernst Krenek (24) are performed for the first time, in the Berlin Blüthnersaal.
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January 5, 1925: Violin Concerto no.1 by Ernst Krenek (24) is performed for the first time, in Dessau.
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February 18, 1925: Concertino for flute, violin, harpsichord, and strings by Ernst Krenek (24) is performed for the first time, in Winterthur.
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June 8, 1925: In Ascona, near Locarno, Ernst Krenek (24) writes to Paul Bekker reluctantly refusing the post of assistant conductor of the State Opera in Kassel. See 17 June 1925.
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June 17, 1925: Ernst Krenek (24) writes to Paul Bekker accepting the post of assistant conductor of the State Opera in Kassel. See 8 June 1925.
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August 25, 1925: Ernst Krenek (25) arrives in Kassel to take up his position as assistant conductor of the State Opera.
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October 25, 1925: Der vertauschte Cupido, a ballet by Ernst Krenek (25) after Rameau, is performed for the first time, in Kassel, the composer conducting.
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November 18, 1925: Fünf Klavierstücke op.39 by Ernst Krenek (25) are performed for the first time, in Kassel, by the composer.
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November 28, 1925: Incidental music to Dietzenschmidt’s (pseud. for Schmidt) play Vom lieben Augustin by Ernst Krenek (25) is performed for the first time, in Kassel, conducted by the composer.
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March 26, 1926: Fünf Lieder op.19 for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (25) to words of Krzyzanowski and Klopstock, are performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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May 9, 1926: Incidental music to Goethe’s play Der Triumph der Empfindsamkeit by Ernst Krenek (25) is performed for the first time, in the Kassel Staatstheater, conducted by the composer. See 28 November 1927.
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November 4, 1926: Stücke für Orchester by Ernst Krenek (26) are performed for the first time, in Winterthur.
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November 27, 1926: Orpheus und Eurydike op.21, an opera by Ernst Krenek (26) to words of Kokoschka, is performed for the first time, in the Kassel Staatstheater.
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January 29, 1927: O Lacrymosa op.48, three songs for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (26) to words of Rilke, is performed for the first time, in Cologne. The same work is also heard in a setting for solo voice, two flutes, two clarinets, two bassoons, and harp.
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February 10, 1927: After rejections from three opera houses, Jonny spielt auf, an opera by Ernst Krenek (26) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Leipzig Stadttheater. It is an immediate success. By the end of the season, it will be produced in 56 different cities, in six languages.
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April 27, 1927: Intrada for clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, two horns, trombone, and timpani by Ernst Krenek (26) is performed for the first time, in Kassel.
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May 11, 1927: Incidental music to a puppet play Marlborough s’en va-t-en guerre by Ernst Krenek (26) is performed for the first time, in the Staatliches Theater, Kassel.
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October 1, 1927: Mammon, a ballet by Ernst Krenek (27) to a story of Balasz (tr. Kröller), is performed for the first time, in the Munich Nationaltheater.
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November 5, 1927: Potpourri for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (27) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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November 28, 1927: A suite from the incidental music to Der Triumph der Empfindsamkeit by Ernst Krenek (27) is performed for the first time, in Hamburg. See 9 May 1926.
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December 7, 1927: Four a cappella choruses by Ernst Krenek (27) to words of Goethe are performed for the first time, in the Vienna Mittlerer Konzerthaussaal.
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March 21, 1928: At the Budapest premiere of Ernst Krenek’s (27) Jonny spielt auf, a stink bomb is thrown.
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May 6, 1928: Three stage compositions by Ernst Krenek (27) to his own words, are performed for the first time, in the Staatstheater, Wiesbaden: the tragic opera Der Diktator, a fairy tale opera, Das geheime Königreich, and the burlesque operetta Schwergewicht, oder Die Ehre der Nation.
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November 3, 1928: Kleine Symphonie by Ernst Krenek (28) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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November 5, 1928: Gesänge op.56, three songs for baritone and piano by Ernst Krenek (28), are performed for the first time, in the Künstlerhaus, Dresden.
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March 27, 1929: Piano Sonata no.2 by Ernst Krenek (28) is performed for the first time, in the Grotrian-Steinweg Saal, Berlin.
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June 16, 1929: The Munich premiere of Ernst Krenek’s Jonny spielt auf is interrupted by a riot of Nazis.
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November 21, 1929: Gesänge nach altern Gedichten for mezzo-soprano and piano by Ernst Krenek (29) to words of Günther, Weckherlin, and Fleming, is performed for the first time, in the Berlin Schwechtensaal.
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January 17, 1930: Reisebuch aus den österreichischen Alpen, a cycle of 20 songs for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (29) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Salle des Landes Konservatoriums, Leipzig.
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January 19, 1930: Leben des Orest, a grand opera by Ernst Krenek (29) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Neues Theater, Leipzig.
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April 11, 1930: Fiedellieder, a cycle of seven songs for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (29) to words of Storm and Mommsen, is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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May 5, 1930: Christophe Colomb, an opera by Darius Milhaud (37) to words of Claudel, is performed for the first time, in the Staatsoper, Berlin. The ideas in the libretto and music will inspire one audience member, Ernst Krenek (29), to compose Karl V.
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May 15, 1930: Trio phantasie for violin, cello, and piano by Ernst Krenek (29) is performed for the first time, in the Berlin Beethovensaal.
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September 29, 1930: String Quartet no.5 by Ernst Krenek (30) is performed for the first time, in Copenhagen.
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April 10, 1931: Durch die Nacht, a cycle of seven songs for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (30) to words of Kraus, is performed for the first time, in the Dresden Künstlerhaus, the composer at the piano. See 19 June 1932.
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October 27, 1931: Die Nachtigall for voice and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (31) to words of Kraus, is performed for the first time, in Bern. See 26 November 1931.
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October 29, 1931: Theme and 13 Variations for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (31) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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November 17, 1931: In a lecture in Mannheim, Ernst Krenek (31) declares that “politically neutral art is not possible.”
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November 26, 1931: Die Nachtigall for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (31) to words of Kraus, is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt. See 27 October 1931.
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March 25, 1932: In his first experiment with twelve-tone technique, Ernst Krenek’s (31) Gesänge des späten Jahres, a cycle of eleven songs for voice and piano to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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June 16, 1932: Kleine Blasmusik for band by Ernst Krenek (31), an arrangement of his Vier Bagatellen, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Südwestfunk originating in Frankfurt. See 25 April 1937.
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June 19, 1932: Durch die Nacht for voice and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (31) is performed for the first time, in the Vienna Musikvereinsaal under the baton of Anton Webern (48). See 10 April 1931.
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November 27, 1932: Gemischte Chöre, three choruses by Ernst Krenek (32) to words of Keller are performed for the first time, in the Großer Konzerthaussaal, Vienna.
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March 5, 1933: A suite from Ernst Krenek’s (32) incidental music Triumph der Empfindsamkeit is withdrawn from a program in Mannheim in an apparent attempt to avoid trouble with the new Nazi government.
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October 9, 1933: Kantate von der Vergänglichkeit des Irdischen for soprano, chorus, and piano by Ernst Krenek (33) to words of various 17th century authors, is performed for the first time, in Zürich the composer at the keyboard.
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January 9, 1934: The Heimwehr publication Österreichische Abendzeitung publishes serious charges against the soon-to-be produced Ernst Krenek (33) opera Karl V and the publishers Universal Edition.
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January 17, 1934: Most Vienna newspapers announce that the production of Ernst Krenek’s (33) opera Karl V has been cancelled.
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January 18, 1934: Conductor Karl Krauss issues a lukewarm defense of Ernst Krenek’s (33) opera Karl V.
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January 23, 1934: The board of directors of the Vienna Opera announce that Ernst Krenek’s (33) opera Karl V is postponed until Fall.
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January 24, 1934: Two vocal works by Ernst Krenek (33) are performed for the first time, in Winterthur, the composer at the keyboard: Das Schweigin for solo voice and piano to words of Eberhard Friedrich Freiherr von Gemminger, and Währed der Trennung for mezzo-soprano, baritone, and piano to words of Fleming.
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March 13, 1934: Ernst Krenek (33) rejoins the Roman Catholic Church.
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September 15, 1934: Cefalo e Procri, an opera by Ernst Krenek (34) to words of Küfferle (tr. Krenek), is performed for the first time, in the Goldoni-Theatre, Venice.
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February 25, 1935: Settings of Austrian Folksongs for chorus by Ernst Krenek (34) are performed for the first time, in the Vienna Ehrbar-Saal.
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March 25, 1935: Vier kleine Männerchöre for alto and male chorus by Ernst Krenek (34) to words of Hölderlin, are performed for the first time, in the Vienna Ehrbar-Saal.
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September 1, 1935: The Nazi Party sends out one of several letters listing composers whose music is considered degenerate and may not be played. Among those honored are Erik Satie (†10), Ernst Bloch (55), Joseph Matthias Hauer (52), Alfredo Casella (52), Alban Berg (50), Kurt Weill (35), Ernst Krenek (35), and Aaron Copland (34).
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October 28, 1935: Kaintuck for piano and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (35) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles. The premiere is heard on two pianos.
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December 28, 1935: The earthly remains of Alban Berg are laid to rest in Hietzing Cemetery, in a grave donated by the City of Vienna. Speaking on behalf of the ISCM is Ernst Krenek (35).
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April 19, 1936: Three works are performed for the first time, in Barcelona: Violin Concerto by Alban Berg (†0), composed to the memory of Manon Gropius, Fragmente aus dem Bühnenwerk Karl V for soprano and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (35), and Ariel, a ballet by Roberto Gerhard (39) to a story by Foix and the composer, in a concert setting. In the audience is Benjamin Britten (22).
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October 23, 1936: Ernst Krenek (36) begins a series of lectures in Vienna, explaining his belief that music must include tonality and atonality.
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April 25, 1937: Vier Bagatellen for piano-four hands by Ernst Krenek (36) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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October 17, 1937: Ernst Krenek (37) arrives in New York on a tour with the Salzburg Opera Guild. The group is performing Krenek’s arrangement of Monteverdi’s (†293) L’incoronazione di Poppea.
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December 12, 1937: Ernst Krenek (37) arrives in Los Angeles with the Salzburg Opera Guild where he will meet Arnold Schoenberg (63) for the first time.
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December 16, 1937: 12 Variationen in drei Sätzen for piano by Ernst Krenek (37) is performed for the first time, in the Los Angeles home of Mrs. Edgar Baruch, by the composer.
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March 2, 1938: His first US tour complete, Ernst Krenek (37) sets sail from New York for Europe.
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March 10, 1938: Austrian composer Ernst Krenek (37) arrives at Le Havre from the United States.
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March 12, 1938: Ernst Krenek (37) attends a performance of his Reisebuch in Brussels. By not proceeding directly to Vienna, he avoids capture by the Germans.
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May 12, 1938: Ernst Krenek (37) manages to obtain a visa to travel to the United States.
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May 24, 1938: As part of the Reichsmusiktage which began two days ago, an exhibition of degenerate music opens in Düsseldorf. Among the composers enshrined as “cultural bolsheviks” are Arnold Schoenberg (63), Igor Stravinsky (55), Alban Berg (†2), Paul Hindemith (42), Kurt Weill (38), and Ernst Krenek (37).
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June 22, 1938: Ernst Krenek’s (37) play with music Karl V, to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Neue Deutsches Theater, Prague. Krenek is not in attendance, fearing to cross German territory. The work was scheduled for performance in Vienna in 1933 but cancelled after rehearsals had begun. The authorities apparently objected to its nationalistic, Catholic, anti-Nazi subject matter.
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August 18, 1938: Ernst Krenek (37) flees Europe, boarding the Ausonia with his wife in Le Havre, making for Montreal.
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August 29, 1938: Ernst Krenek (38) crosses from Canada into the United States.
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September 14, 1938: Ernst Krenek (38), recently arrived from Montreal, takes a room at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel, Boston.
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September 19, 1938: Ernst Krenek (38) begins duties as an instructor at the Malkin Conservatory, Boston.
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November 4, 1938: Piano Concerto no.2 by Ernst Krenek (38) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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January 3, 1939: Twelve Short Pieces Written in the Twelve-Tone Technique for piano by Ernst Krenek (38) is performed for the first time, by the composer, over the airwaves of NBC originating in Washington.
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February 8, 1939: Ernst Krenek (38) accepts a two-year appointment as full professor at Vassar College.
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May 19, 1939: Eight Column Line, a ballet by Ernst Krenek (38), is performed for the first time, in Avery Memorial Auditorium, Hartford, Connecticut conducted by the composer.
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July 27, 1939: School Music, nine pieces for various combinations of instruments by Ernst Krenek (38), is performed for the first time, in Hill Auditorium, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
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November 16, 1939: Suite for solo cello by Ernst Krenek (39) is performed for the first time, in Skinner Recital Hall of Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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May 23, 1940: The Little Concerto for piano, organ, and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (39) is performed for the first time, in Skinner Recital Hall, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York conducted by the composer.
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June 11, 1940: In a concert by the Basler Kammerorchester in the Neuer Casino-Saal, Basel, Béla Bartók’s (59) Divertimento for Strings is performed for the first time, along with the premiere of Symphonic Piece for string orchestra by Ernst Krenek (39).
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December 7, 1940: Two Choruses on Jacobean Poems for female chorus by Ernst Krenek (40) to words of Drummond and Raleigh, are performed for the first time, in Skinner Recital Hall, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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December 15, 1940: Proprium missae in festo SS.Innocentium martyrum for female chorus by Ernst Krenek (40) is performed for the first time, in the Vassar College Chapel, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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May 13, 1941: Excerpts from Tarquin, a chamber opera by Ernst Krenek (40) to words of Lavery, are performed for the first time, in Avery Hall, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York. The composer plays a piano reduction of the score. See 16 July 1950.
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July 24, 1941: The Holy Ghost’s Ark for mezzo-soprano, oboe, clarinet, viola, and cello by Ernst Krenek (40) to words of Donne, is performed for the first time, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
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March 1, 1942: Lieder nach Worten von Franz Kafka for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (41) are performed for the first time, in Skinner Recital Hall, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York the composer at the piano.
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May 3, 1942: An Organ Sonata by Ernst Krenek (41) is performed for the first time, in Vassar College Chapel, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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September 1, 1942: Ernst Krenek (42) arrives in St. Paul, Minnesota to take up duties as Professor of Music, Chairman of the Music Department, and Dean of the School of Fine Arts at Hamline University.
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December 11, 1942: I Wonder as I Wander for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (42) is performed for the first time, in Minneapolis.
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April 4, 1943: Excerpts from Lamentatio Jeremiae prophetae for chorus by Ernst Krenek (42) are performed for the first time, in Bridgman Hall, Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota. See 5 October 1958.
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December 1, 1943: Piano Sonata no.3 by Ernst Krenek (43) is performed for the first time, in Bridgman Hall, Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota by the composer.
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March 24, 1944: Cantata for Wartime for female chorus and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (43) to words of Melville is performed for the first time, in Northrop Memorial Auditorium, Minneapolis.
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October 30, 1944: Sonatina for flute and clarinet by Ernst Krenek (44) is performed for the first time, in Buenos Aires. The work is an arrangement of his Sonatina for flute and viola. See 22 October 1945.
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November 15, 1944: String Quartet no.7 by Ernst Krenek (44) is performed for the first time, in the War Memorial Building Auditorium, Indianapolis.
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January 24, 1945: Ernst Krenek (44) becomes an American citizen in St. Paul, Minnesota.
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June 3, 1945: Five Prayers for women’s voices over the Pater noster as cantus firmus by Ernst Krenek (44) to words of Donne, is performed for the first time, at Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota.
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October 21, 1945: Sonata for violin and piano op.99 by Ernst Krenek (45) is performed for the first time, in Bridgman Hall, Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota the composer at the piano.
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October 22, 1945: Sonatina for flute and viola by Ernst Krenek (45) is performed for the first time, in Teatro del Pueblo, Buenos Aires.
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March 27, 1946: Tricks and Trifles for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (45) is performed for the first time, in Northrop Auditorium, Minneapolis.
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May 10, 1946: In paradisum, a motet for female chorus by Ernst Krenek (45) is performed for the first time, in Jeanne d’Arc Auditorium, College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, Minnesota.
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September 3, 1946: Symphonic Elegy for string orchestra by Ernst Krenek (46) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York. See 24 March 1965.
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November 22, 1946: Piano Concerto no.3 by Ernst Krenek (46) is performed for the first time, in Northrup Auditorium, Minneapolis. The conductor, Dmitri Mitropoulos, is also piano soloist.
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November 27, 1946: Trio for violin, clarinet, and piano by Ernst Krenek (46) is performed for the first time, in Jeanne d’Arc Auditorium, College of St. Catherine, St. Paul, Minnesota.
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February 9, 1947: Seven Piano Pieces by Ernst Krenek (46) are performed for the first time, in Bridgman Hall, Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota.
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March 12, 1947: Works for chorus by Ernst Krenek (46) are performed for the first time, at Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota: the motet Aegrotavit Ezechias and excerpts from Santa Fe Timetable, to words taken from the timetable of the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe Railroad. See 20 February 1961.
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April 11, 1947: The Santa Fe Timetable for chorus by Ernst Krenek (46) is performed completely for the first time, at the University of Chicago on a program with the premiere of Krenek’s Viola Sonata.
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April 25, 1947: Songs on Poems by Gerard Manley Hopkins for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (46) is performed for the first time, in Waco Hall, Baylor University, Waco, Texas.
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November 27, 1947: Ernst Krenek’s (47) Symphony no.4 is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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December 7, 1947: Ernst Krenek (47) resigns his position at Hamline University, intending to move to California.
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November 5, 1948: Piano Sonata no.4 by Ernst Krenek (48) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco, California.
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December 19, 1948: Sonata no.2 for violin alone by Ernst Krenek (48) is performed for the first time, in the National Gallery of Art, Washington.
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April 4, 1949: Trio for violin, viola, and cello by Ernst Krenek (48) is performed for the first time, in Wilshire-Ebell Theatre, Los Angeles.
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May 16, 1949: Ernst Krenek (48) accepts the position of chairman of the composition department at Chicago Musical College.
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March 16, 1950: Symphony no.5 by Ernst Krenek (49) is performed for the first time, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
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April 5, 1950: The Ballad of the Railroads for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (49) to his own words is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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May 28, 1950: Lieder for solo voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (49) to words of Verhaeren are performed for the first time, in Los Angeles, 26 years after they were composed.
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July 16, 1950: Tarquin, an opera by Ernst Krenek (49) to a new German text by Schute-Strathaus and Funk, is staged for the first time, in Cologne. See 13 May 1941.
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August 8, 1950: Ernst Krenek (49) marries his third wife Gladys Nordenstrom, a former student at Hamline University, in Los Angeles City Hall.
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September 24, 1950: George Washington Variations for piano by Ernst Krenek (50) is performed for the first time, in Wilshire Ebell Theatre, Los Angeles.
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January 15, 1951: Parvula corona musicalis for string trio by Ernst Krenek (50) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Italiana orginating in Rome.
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May 2, 1951: Dark Waters, an opera by Ernst Krenek (50) to his own words after Melville, is performed for the first time, in Bovard Auditorium at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.
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May 28, 1951: Three Lieder for mezzo-soprano, clarinet, and string quartet by Ernst Krenek (50) to words of Verhaeren are performed for the first time, in Los Angeles City College Auditorium the composer conducting.
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October 6, 1951: Two works for small groups of instruments are performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen: Double Concerto for violin, piano, and small orchestra by Ernst Krenek (51), and Polyphonie X for 18 instruments by Pierre Boulez (26).
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October 22, 1951: Piano Concerto no.4 by Ernst Krenek (51) is performed for the first time, in Cologne, under the baton of the composer.
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December 12, 1952: Concerto for harp and chamber orchestra by Ernst Krenek (52) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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January 16, 1953: String Quartet no.6 by Ernst Krenek (52) is performed for the first time, in Darmstadt.
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March 13, 1953: Medea, a dramatic monologue for mezzo-soprano and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (52) to words of Jeffers after Euripedes, is performed for the first time, in the Philadelphia Academy of Music. It achieves great success.
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September 6, 1953: Sinfonietta a Brasileira for string orchestra by Ernst Krenek (53) is performed for the first time, in Besançon, France.
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October 24, 1953: Concerto for two pianos and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (53) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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March 4, 1954: Cello Concerto no.1 by Ernst Krenek (53) is performed for the first time, in Philharmonic Auditorium, Los Angeles.
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April 6, 1954: Fantasy for cello and piano by Ernst Krenek (53) is performed for the first time, in Lucerne, the composer at the keyboard.
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September 21, 1954: Twenty Miniatures for piano by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, in St. Gallen, the composer conducting.
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October 11, 1954: Symphony Pallas Athene by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of NDR, originating in Hamburg, the composer conducting.
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January 17, 1955: Short Pieces for string quartet or string orchestra by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, in the Basel Konservatoriumssaal.
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February 12, 1955: Eleven Transparencies for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, in Louisville.
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February 18, 1955: Violin Concerto no.2 by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of WDR, Cologne.
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March 27, 1955: Mottete zur Opferung, zür das ganze Kirchenjahr for chorus by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, in Basel.
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May 14, 1955: Ernst Krenek (54) is awarded the City of Vienna Prize of 10,000 schillings. As he can not be present, his mother receives it for him.
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May 31, 1955: Capriccio for cello and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (54) is performed for the first time, in the Kranichsteiner Musikinstitut, Darmstadt.
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October 17, 1955: Ernst Krenek’s (55) opera Pallas Athene Weint to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Hamburg State Opera.
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May 14, 1956: Ich singe wieder, wenn es tagt for chorus and string orchestra by Ernst Krenek (55) to words of Walther von der Volgelweide, is performed for the first time, in the Kongresssaal der Arbeiterkammer, Linz the composer conducting.
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May 30, 1956: Several works involving magnetic tape are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of WDR, originating in Cologne: Gesang der Junglinge no.8 by Karlheinz Stockhausen (27) to words from the Bible, Klangfiguren II by Gottfried Michael Koenig (29), and Spiritus intelligentiae, sanctus by Ernst Krenek (55) for two solo voices and tape.
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July 5, 1956: Suite for flute and piano or strings by Ernst Krenek (55) is performed for the first time, in Santiago, Chile.
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March 17, 1957: The Bell-Tower, an opera by Ernst Krenek (56) to his own words, after Melville, is performed for the first time, in Lincoln Hall Theatre at the University of Illinois, Urbana. The work is well received.
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May 12, 1957: In a recital at Moscow Conservatory, Glenn Gould performs the Piano Sonata of Alban Berg (†21), the Piano Variations op.27 of Anton Webern (†11), and two movements from the Piano Sonata no.3 of Ernst Krenek (57). Among the audience is Sofiya Gubaidulina (25).
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January 24, 1958: Two works are performed for the first time, in Basel: Ernst Krenek’s (57) orchestral work Kette, Kreis und Spiegel, and Bohuslav Martinu’s (67) cantata The Epic of Gilgamesh to ancient Babylonian words.
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January 27, 1958: Harp Sonata by Ernst Krenek (57) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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March 9, 1958: Sestina for solo voice and chamber ensemble by Ernst Krenek (57) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the New School for Social Research, New York, the composer conducting.
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March 31, 1958: Pentagramm for woodwind quintet by Ernst Krenek (57) is performed for the first time, in Schoenberg Hall at the University of California at Los Angeles.
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September 7, 1958: Hexahedron for chamber ensemble by Ernst Krenek (58) is performed for the first time, in the Darmstadt Landestheater. Also premiered is Cori di Didone for chorus and percussion by Luigi Nono (34) to words of Ungaretti, conducted by Bruno Maderna (38).
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October 5, 1958: Lamentatio Jeremiae prophetae for chorus by Ernst Krenek (58) is performed completely for the first time, in St. Martin Kirche, Kassel. See 4 April 1943.
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February 16, 1959: Suite for guitar by Ernst Krenek (58) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles County Auditorium.
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September 29, 1959: Sechs Motetten nach Worten von Franz Kafka for chorus by Ernst Krenek (59) is performed for the first time, at Berlin Conservatory.
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November 22, 1959: Hausmusik for seven different chamber combinations by Ernst Krenek (59) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of RIAS, Berlin.
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February 22, 1960: Marginal Sounds for violin, piano, celesta, vibraphone, xylophone, and percussion by Ernst Krenek (59) is performed for the first time, in Caspary Auditorium of the Manhattan School of Music, New York. See 17 April 1962.
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May 9, 1960: Two works by Ernst Krenek (59) are performed for the first time, in New York: Sonatina for oboe and Monologue for clarinet solo.
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August 7, 1960: Robert Ashley (30), Gordon Mumma (25), Roger Reynolds (26), and George Cacioppo, having driven from Ann Arbor, Michigan, attend a week-long composers’ conference organized by the Canadian League of Composers in Stratford, Ontario. Among the luminaries present are Luciano Berio (34), Edgar Varèse (76), Roy Harris (62), Ernst Krenek (59), and George Rochberg (42). The four decide that they could organize a better conference and by the time they arrive home, they have planned the ONCE Festival.
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September 22, 1960: Flötenstück neunphasig for flute and piano by Ernst Krenek (60) is performed for the first time, in Venice.
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September 30, 1960: Quaestio Temporis for chamber orchestra by Ernst Krenek (60) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of NDR originating in Hamburg the composer conducting.
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October 9, 1960: Sechs Vermessene for piano by Ernst Krenek (60) is performed for the first time, in Kassel.
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November 28, 1960: Sonata no.1 for violin solo by Ernst Krenek (60) is performed for the first time, in Darmstadt.
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January 19, 1961: Basler Massarbeit for two pianos by Ernst Krenek (60) is performed for the first time, in Basel, the composer at the keyboard.
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February 20, 1961: Santa Fe Timetable for chorus by Ernst Krenek (60) to words from the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Timetable is performed completely for the first time, in Los Angeles. See 12 March 1947.
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March 2, 1962: Kanon Igor Strawinsky zum 80. Geburtstag for chorus by Ernst Krenek (61), to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Fiesta Hall, Plummer Park, Los Angeles.
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April 17, 1962: Jest of Cards, a ballet version of Marginal Sounds by Ernst Krenek (61), is performed for the first time, in Geary Theatre, San Francisco. See 22 February 1960.
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May 23, 1962: Vertrauenssache (What Price Confidence?), a chamber opera by Ernst Krenek (61) to his own translation of his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Saarbrücken Stadttheater.
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July 25, 1962: Ausgerechnet und verspielt, a television opera by Ernst Krenek (61) to his own words, is performed for the first time, under the composer’s direction over the airwaves of Österreicher Fernsehen, originating in Vienna.
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July 30, 1962: Incidental music to Hofmannsthal’s play Jedermann by Ernst Krenek (61) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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August 25, 1962: Alpbach Quintet for wind quintet and percussion by Ernst Krenek (62) is performed for the first time, in Alpbach, Austria, the composer conducting.
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October 25, 1962: Two new works are performed for the first time in the Beethovensaal der Stuttgarter Liederhalle: Polla ta dhina for children’s chorus, wind, and percussion by Iannis Xenakis (40) to words of Sophocles and Nach wie vor der Reihe nach for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (62).
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November 29, 1962: Suite for clarinet and piano by Ernst Krenek (62) is performed for the first time, in Beaumont Lecture Hall, University of Miami, Florida.
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March 15, 1963: San Fernando Sequence by Ernst Krenek (62) is performed for the first time, at San Fernando State College, California.
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June 16, 1964: Der goldene Bock, an opera by Ernst Krenek (63) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Hamburg State Opera, under the baton of the composer.
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March 3, 1965: From Three Make Seven for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (64) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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March 24, 1965: Sargasso, a ballet to Symphonic Elegy by Ernst Krenek (64), is performed for the first time, in the New York State Theatre, New York. See 3 September 1946.
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May 3, 1965: O Holy Ghost, a motet for chorus by Ernst Krenek (64) to words of Donne, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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July 7, 1965: Fibonacci Mobile for string quartet and piano-four hands by Ernst Krenek (64) is performed for the first time, in Spaulding Auditorium, Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
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July 27, 1965: Incidental music to Sophocles’ (tr. Bayer) play König Oedipus by Ernst Krenek (64) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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September 9, 1965: Wechselrahmen, six songs for voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (65) to words of Barth, is performed for the first time, in Düsseldorf, the composer at the keyboard.
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October 3, 1965: Quintana über die fünf Vokale, six songs for solo voice, chamber ensemble, and tape by Ernst Krenek (65) to his own words, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Danish Radio, originating in Copenhagen, the composer conducting.
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August 28, 1966: Adagio und Fuge (movements four and five of the String Quartet no.6 arranged for string orchestra) by Ernst Krenek (66) is performed for the first time, in Lucerne.
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December 21, 1966: Glaben und Wissen for chorus, four speakers, and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (66) to his own words is performed for the first time, under the baton of the composer over the airwaves of NDR, originating in Hamburg.
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January 7, 1967: Two chamber works by Ernst Krenek (66) are performed for the first time, in Bamberg: Little Suite op.28 for clarinet and piano, the composer at the keyboard, and Invention for flute and clarinet op.127a.
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May 21, 1967: Stücke for oboe and piano by Ernst Krenek (66) is performed for the first time, in Zagreb.
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July 2, 1967: Proprium für das Dreifaltigkeitsfest for soprano, chorus, two trumpets, timpani, and organ by Ernst Krenek (66) is performed for the first time, in Basel.
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August 12, 1967: Horizon Circled for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (66) is performed for the first time, at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.
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September 6, 1967: Der Zauberspiegel, a television opera by Ernst Krenek (67) to his own words, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Munich Bayerische Fernsehen, under the direction of the composer.
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November 5, 1967: Pieces for trombone and piano by Ernst Krenek (67) is performed for the first time, in the Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo.
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January 19, 1968: Excercises of a Late Hour for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (67) is performed for the first time, at the University of California at San Diego the composer conducting.
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April 23, 1968: Cello Studien by Ernst Krenek (67) are performed for the first time, in Riehen, Switzerland.
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July 6, 1968: Perspektiven for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (67) is performed for the first time, in Ravinia, Illinois.
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August 1, 1968: Rondo for string quartet by Anton Webern (†22) is performed for the first time, at the Fourth International Webern Festival, Hanover, New Hampshire, 62 years after it was composed. On the same program, Instant Remembered for soprano, orchestra, and tape by Ernst Krenek (67) to words of various authors, is performed for the first time, the composer conducting. The work is dedicated to the memory of Webern.
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August 22, 1968: Proprium Missae per a le festa de la nativitat de la mare de Deu (8 de setembre) for chorus, instruments, and organ by Ernst Krenek is performed for the first time, in Abadia, Montserrat, on the eve of the composer’s 68th birthday.
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November 24, 1968: Organologia for organ by Ernst Krenek (68) is performed for the first time, in the Petri-Kirche, Mülheim.
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January 5, 1970: Fivefold Enfoldment for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (69) is performed for the first time, in the Beethovenhalle, Bonn.
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March 14, 1970: Six Profiles for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (69) is performed for the first time, in the Center for the Arts Auditorium, Fargo, North Dakota.
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June 27, 1970: Sardokai, oder Das kommt davon, an opera by Ernst Krenek (69) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Hamburg State Opera directed by the composer. In spite of the support of some of the audience, the work is a failure.
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October 26, 1970: Doppelt beflügeltes Band for two pianos and tape by Ernst Krenek (70) is performed for the first time, in Graz.
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December 4, 1970: Piano Piece in Eleven Parts by Ernst Krenek (70) is performed for the first time, in Rudolf Ganz Recital Hall, Chicago Musical College of Roosevelt University.
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January 24, 1971: Duo for flute, double bass, and tape by Ernst Krenek (70) is performed for the first time, at the College of the Desert, Palm Desert, California.
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October 12, 1971: Messe Gib uns den Frieden for chorus and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (71) is performed for the first time, in Hauptkirche St. Nikolay, Hamburg.
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October 18, 1971: Three works by Ernst Krenek (71) are performed for the first time, in Ann Arbor, Michigan: Three Sacred Pieces for chorus to words of the Bible, Three Lessons for chorus to words of the composer, and Orga-nastro for organ and tape.
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June 20, 1972: Kitharaulos for oboe, harp, piano, percussion, and strings by Ernst Krenek (71) is performed for the first time, in The Hague.
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October 11, 1972: Aulokithara for oboe, harp, and tape by Ernst Krenek (72) is performed for the first time, in the Hilton Hotel, Mainz.
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March 13, 1973: Statisch und ekstatisch for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (72) is performed for the first time, in Zürich directed by the composer.
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October 29, 1973: Ernst Krenek’s (73) music to his own television play Flaschenpost vom Paradies, oder Der englische Ausflug is performed for the first time, over Österreichische Rundfunk, originating in Vienna. See 8 March 1974.
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March 8, 1974: Flaschenpost vom Paradies, oder Der englische Ausflug, a television opera by Ernst Krenek (73) to his own words, is screened for the first time, over Austrian television. 29 October 1973.
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May 15, 1974: Zeitlieder, two songs for mezzo-soprano and string quartet by Ernst Krenek (73) to words of Pandula, is performed for the first time, in Augsburg.
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July 22, 1974: Spätlese, six songs for baritone and piano by Ernst Krenek (73) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Munich the composer at the keyboard.
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August 21, 1974: Von vorn herien for chamber orchestra by Ernst Krenek (73) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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June 13, 1975: Auf-und Ablehnung for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (74) is performed for the first time, in the Meistersingerhalle, Nuremberg.
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September 12, 1975: Feiertags-Kantate for speaker, mezzo-soprano, baritone, chorus, and orchestra by Ernst Krenek (75) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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September 22, 1975: Drei Lieder op.216 for solo voice and piano by Ernst Krenek (75) to words of von Sauter are performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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October 2, 1975: Ernst Krenek (75) receives the Ehrenzeichen für Wissenschaft und Kunst (Cross of Austria), Austria’s highest award.
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March 11, 1977: Dream Sequence for symphonic band by Ernst Krenek (76) is performed for the first time, at the University of Maryland, College Park the composer conducting.
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March 13, 1977: Four Winds Suite for organ by Ernst Krenek (76) is performed for the first time, in the Johanneskirche, Düsseldorf.
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November 6, 1978: They Knew What They Wanted for speaker, oboe, piano, percussion, and tape by Ernst Krenek (78) to his own words is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music, New York directed by the composer.
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March 11, 1979: Monologue: The Dissembler for baritone and chamber ensemble by Ernst Krenek (78) to words of the composer and various other authors is performed for the first time, in Baltimore.
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July 22, 1979: Concerto for organ and string orchestra op.230 by Ernst Krenek (78) is performed for the first time, in the Stiftskirche, Ossiach, Austria.
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March 10, 1980: Opus 231 for violin and organ by Ernst Krenek (79) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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October 19, 1980: Deutsche messgesänge zum 29. Sonntag im Jahreskreis for speaker, chorus, and organ by Ernst Krenek (80) is performed for the first time, in Graz Cathedral.
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October 26, 1980: Im Tal der Zeit for orchestra by Ernst Krenek (80) is performed for the first time, in Graz.
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June 7, 1981: String Quartet no.8 by Ernst Krenek (80) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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February 24, 1982: Arc of Life for chamber orchestra by Ernst Krenek (81) is performed for the first time, at the College of the Desert, Palm Springs, California.
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May 17, 1983: A Concerto for organ and orchestra op.235 by Ernst Krenek (82) is performed for the first time, in Melbourne Concert Hall.
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August 9, 1983: Cello Concerto no.2 by Ernst Krenek (82) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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April 10, 1984: Ernst Krenek (83) undergoes a four-and-a-half hour operation on his gallbladder in Los Angeles.
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August 23, 1986: Divertimento for string orchestra by Ernst Krenek is performed for the first time, in Ossiach, Austria on the 86th anniversary of the composer's birth. The work was completed in 1956.
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August 23, 1987: Streichtrio in zwölf Stationen by Ernst Krenek is performed for the first time, in Ossiach, Austria, on the composer’s 87th birthday.
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July 27, 1988: Symeon der Stylit, an oratorio by Ernst Krenek (87) to words of Bell and the Book of Psalms, is performed for the first time, at the Universitätskirche, Salzburg. Krenek began the composition in 1935 but completed it only last year.
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May 8, 1990: Opus sine nomine by Ernst Krenek (89) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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December 6, 1990: Kehraus um St. Stephan, an opera by Ernst Krenek (90) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Vienna 60 years after it was composed.
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December 23, 1991: Ernst Krenek dies of respiratory failure in a hospital in Palm Springs, California, aged 91 years and four months.  His mortal remains will be laid to rest in the Zentralfriedhof in Vienna.