A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Charles Koechlin

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November 27, 1867: Charles Louis Eugène Koechlin is born in Paris, French Empire, the seventh child of Jules Koechlin, a textile designer, and Camille Dollfus, daughter of a textile manufacturer.
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May 18, 1894: The Prelude from L’épopée de l’Ecole Polytechnique op.2, a cantata by Charles Koechlin (26), is performed for the first time, in Trocadéro, Paris.
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April 30, 1896: Numbers three and six of the Rondels op.1 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (28) are performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris, along with L’air op.8/5. See 20 January 1897.
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October 23, 1896: Charles Koechlin (28) enters the composition class of Gabriel Fauré (51) at the Paris Conservatoire.
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January 20, 1897: Several songs for voice and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (29) are performed for the first time, in Paris: Rondels op.1 to words of Banville and Charles d’Orleans is performed completely for the first time, along with La Paix op.8/7 to words of Banville, and Les clairs de lune op.9 to words of Leconte de Lisle. See 30 April 1896.
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April 7, 1897: Chant for english horn and piano by Charles Koechlin (29) is performed for the first time, in Paris. Koechlin will orchestrate it as Au loin. See 23 February 1908.
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March 19, 1898: Promenade galante op.5/1 for voice and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (30) to words of Banville is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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March 14, 1899: Hymne à Astarté op.39/1 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (31) is performed for the first time, in Théâtre de la Bodinière, Paris. See 29 January 1918.
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March 17, 1899: Sou bois op.4/2 for voice, female chorus, and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (31) to words of Gille is performed for the first time, in Salle Erard, Paris.
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May 10, 1899: La véranda op.3 for voice, female chorus, and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (31) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed for the first time, privately, at the home of Mme. A. Duglé, Paris. See 18 May 1904.
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May 19, 1899: Dans le ciel clair op.4/1 for three solo voices, female chorus, and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (31) to words of Leconte de Lisle, is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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May 23, 1899: Si tu le veux op.5/5 for voice and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (31) to words of Marsan is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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June 15, 1899: A funeral service in memory of Ernest Chausson held in St. François-de-Sales, Paris is attended by hundreds of artists, among them Gabriel Fauré (54), Henri Duparc (51), Isaac Albéniz (39), Claude Debussy (36), Paul Dukas (33), Charles Koechlin (31), Edgar Degas, and Auguste Rodin. His mortal remains are laid to rest in Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris.
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November 26, 1899: La lampe du ciel op.12, a cantata for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Charles Koechlin to words of Leconte de Lisle, is performed for the first time, privately at the home of Jules Griset, Paris, on the eve of the composer’s 32nd birthday. See 13 February 1903.
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December 27, 1900: L’hiver op.8/2 for voice and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (33) to words of Banville is performed for the first time, in Paris, the composer at the keyboard.
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January 20, 1901: Two songs for voice and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (33) are performed for the first time, in Paris: La prière du mort op.17/2 to words of Heredia, and Epiphanie op.17/3 to words of Leconte de Lisle.
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March 20, 1902: Menuet op.5/4 for voice and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (34) to words of Gregh is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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March 22, 1902: Three songs for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (34) to words of Banville are performed for the first time, in Paris: La terre op.14/6, L’automne op.14/7, and Les étoiles op.14/8. Also premiered is Koechlin’s Juin op.15/1 to words of Leconte de Lisle.
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October 19, 1902: La fin de l’homme op.11, a cantata for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (34) to words of Leconte de Lisle, is performed for the first time, in Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris.
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February 13, 1903: La lampe du ciel op.12, a cantata for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (35) to words of Leconte de Lisle, is performed publicly for the first time, in Paris. See 26 November 1899.
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April 24, 1903: Charles Koechlin (35) marries Suzanne Pierrard in Paris.
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May 18, 1904: La véranda op.3 for voice, female chorus, and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin (36) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed publicly for the first time, in Salle Erard, Paris, the composer conducting. See 10 May 1899.
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December 11, 1904: En mer, la nuit op.27, a symphonic poem by Charles Koechlin (37) is performed for the first time, in Théâtre du Chátelet, Paris.
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February 7, 1906: Midi op.15/2 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (38) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed for the first time, privately, at the home of Mme Duglé, Paris. See 30 December 1933.
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November 30, 1907: Le jour op.14/1, a song for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (40) to words of Banville, is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris, the composer at the keyboard.
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February 14, 1908: Déclin d’amour op.13/1 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (40) to words of Sully-Prudhomme is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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February 23, 1908: Nox op.15/3 for voice and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (40) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed for the first time, in Paris the composer conducting. Also premiered is the orchestral arrangement of Koechlin’s Au loin op.20/2. See 7 April 1897.
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March 11, 1908: Several works by Charles Koechlin (40) are performed for the first time, in Théâtre des Arts, Paris: The second two of the Quatre poèmes de “La bonne chanson” de Paul Verlaine op.24 for voice and piano, Berceuse phoque op.18/1, for voice and piano to words of Kipling (tr. Fabulet and d’Humières), Sur la grève op.28/1 for voice and piano to words of d’Humières, the first two of the Trois pièces op.34 for bassoon and piano, and Trois pièces op.34bis for flute, bassoon and piano. The composer is at the keyboard for the first, second, and last of these. See 26 November 1917.
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May 7, 1908: The first two of the Quatre poèmes de “La bonne chanson” de Paul Verlaine op.24 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (40) are performed for the first time, in Paris, the composer at the keyboard. Also premiered is Koechlin’s La guerre op.14/9 for voice or chorus and orchestra to words of Banville
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May 22, 1908: L’abbaye (part 1) op.16 for solo voices, chorus, organ, and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (40) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris.
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May 30, 1908: Three songs by Charles Koechlin (40) to words of Leconte de Lisle are performed for the first time, in Paris the composer at the keyboard: Les rêves morts op.13/2, Dans l’air léger op.21/1, and Le colibri op.17/1.
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January 16, 1909: Maurice Ravel (34) writes to Charles Koechlin (41) proposing a new musical society in competition with the Société Nationale.  Koechlin will respond positively.  See 20 April 1910.
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March 9, 1909: Interlude pour six trombones op.42/5 by Charles Koechlin (41) is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris.
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November 14, 1909: Après-midi d’Octobre op.30/2 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (41) is performed for the first time, in Théâtre des Arts, Paris.
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February 9, 1910: L’astre rouge op.13/4 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (42) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed for the first time, in Paris, the composer at the keyboard.
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February 23, 1910: La chanson des ingénues op.22/1 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (42) to words of Verlaine is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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June 9, 1910: Les temples, op.46/1, the first part of Études antiques for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (42) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris.
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March 6, 1911: Interlude d’orgue op.42/6 by Charles Koechlin (43) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris.
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January 29, 1912: Mon rêve familier for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (44) to words of Verlaine is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris, the composer at the piano.
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March 13, 1912: Two songs for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (44) to words of Samain are performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris: L’île ancienne op.31/3 and Le repas préparé op.31/5.
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May 9, 1912: Four of the Esquisses pour piano op.41 by Charles Koechlin (44) are performed for the first time, in Salle Erard, Paris.
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June 17, 1912: The orchestrated version of En Habit de cheval by Erik Satie (46) is performed for the first time, in the Salle Gaveau by Société de Musique Independante. The composer is refused admittance because he is not dressed well enough. Also premiered is Les vendanges op.30/1 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (44).
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June 5, 1913: Two songs for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (45) to words of Samain are performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris: Le cortège d’Amphitrite op.31/2 and La maison du matin op.31/4.
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March 15, 1914: Movements 2-4 of Études antiques op.46 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (46) are performed for the first time, in Théâtre du Chatelet, Paris.
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June 3, 1914: Deux mélodies hébraïques for voice and piano by Maurice Ravel (39) are performed for the first time, at the Salle Malakoff, Paris, the composer at the piano.  Also premiered are the Sonata for flute and piano op.52 by Charles Koechlin (46) and the Sonata for flute and piano by Alfredo Casella (30).
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May 27, 1915: Sonata for two violins and piano op.15 by Darius Milhaud (22) is performed for the first time, in Salle des agriculteurs, Paris. The composer plays one of the violin parts. Also premiered are two works by Charles Koechlin (47), the composer at the keyboard: La jeune Tarentine op.23/1 for voice and piano to words of André Chénier, and Sonata for viola and piano op.53. The viola soloist is Darius Milhaud (22).
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March 23, 1916: Néère op.23/2 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (48) to words of André Chéniers is performed for the first time, at the home of Mme Herscher, Paris, the composer at the keyboard.
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February 18, 1917: Sonatine for piano op.59/4 by Charles Koechlin (49) is performed for the first time, at the home of Mme Herscher-Clément, Paris.
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May 14, 1917: Some of the Paysages et marines op.63 for piano by Charles Koechlin (49) are performed for the first time, in Paris.
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May 18, 1917: Sonata for violin and piano op.64 by Charles Koechlin (49) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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November 26, 1917: Trois poèmes op.18 for voice(s) and piano or orchestra by Charles Koechlin to words of Kipling (tr. Fabulet and d’Humières) is performed completely for the first time, in Théâtre du Vieux-Colombier, Paris, the composer conducting on the eve of his 50th birthday. See 11 March 1908.
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January 26, 1918: Le vaisseau op.28/4 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (50) to words of Haraucourt is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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January 29, 1918: Cinq Chansons de Bilitis op.39 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (50) to words of Louÿs is performed completely for the first time, in Théâtre du Vieux-Colombier, Paris. See 14 March 1899.
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November 10, 1918: Charles Koechlin (50) arrives in New York from France to give a series of lectures on French music.
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November 19, 1918: Charles Koechlin (50) dines at the White House, discussing the League of Nations with President Wilson.
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January 4, 1919: Charles Koechlin (51) sails from the United States for Bordeaux after two months in the country.
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June 15, 1919: Nuit de Walpurgis classique op.38, a symphonic poem by Charles Koechlin (51), is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris.
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January 30, 1920: Chant funèbre à la mémoire des jeunes femmes défuntes op.37 for chorus, organ, and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (52) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris. The organist is Nadia Boulanger (32).
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February 7, 1920: Rapsodie sur des chansons françaises op.62 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (52) is performed for the first time, in Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris.
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May 19, 1920: String Quartet no.1 by Charles Koechlin (52) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris.
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December 2, 1920: Sonatine for piano op.59/5 by Charles Koechlin (53) is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris.
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March 6, 1921: Le nénuphar op.13/3 for voice and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (53) to words of Haraucourt is performed for the first time, in Théâtre du Chátelet, Paris, 22 years after it was composed.
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May 26, 1921: Several selections from Dix petites pièces faciles op.61c and Douze petites pièces op.61d for piano by Charles Koechlin (53) are performed for the first time, in Salle de l’Ancien Conservatoire, Paris.
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November 4, 1921: Charles Koechlin (53) visits Francis Poulenc (22) in the Rue de Monceau. They agree that Poulenc will receive lessons twice a week. Over the next nine months, Koechlin gives Poulenc 38 lessons.
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December 10, 1921: Trois chorals op.76/1 for instrumental ensembles by Charles Koechlin (54) are performed for the first time, in Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris.
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January 7, 1922: Sonata for two flutes op.75 by Charles Koechlin (54) is performed for the first time, in Salle des agriculteurs, Paris.
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January 29, 1922: L’espérance op.49/1 for organ and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (54) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris by Nadia Boulanger (34).
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March 18, 1922: Sonata for oboe and piano op.58 by Charles Koechlin (54) is performed for the first time, in Salle Erard, Paris.
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April 20, 1922: The first three of the four movements of La forêt païnne, a ballet by Charles Koechlin (54), is performed for the first time, at the Paris Opéra. See 11 June 1925.
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May 16, 1922: Several works by Charles Koechlin (54) are performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris: Hymne à Vénus op.68/1 for voice and piano to words of Villiers de l’Isle-Adam; Accompagnement op.28/3 for voice and piano to words of Samain; Chanson d’Engaddi and Le ventre merveilleux, two of the Cinq mélodies sur des poèmes de “Shéhérazade” de Tristan Klingsor op.56 for voice and piano; and two Sonatines for piano op.59/2-3.
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December 13, 1922: Choral sur le nom de Fauré op.73bis for piano and chorus ad lib by Charles Koechlin (55) is performed for the first time, in Salle de l’École Normale, Paris.
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October 25, 1923: Deux chorals pour petit orchestre op.76/2 by Charles Koechlin (55) are performed for the first time, in Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris.
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January 20, 1924: String Quartet no.3 op.72 by Charles Koechlin (56) is performed for the first time, in Mulhouse.
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March 6, 1924: Sonata for cello and piano op.66 by Charles Koechlin (56) is performed for the first time, in Salle des agriculteurs, Paris.
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May 15, 1925: Sonata for horn and piano op.70 by Charles Koechlin (57) is performed for the first time, in Paris. See 24 March 1927.
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May 19, 1925: Jacob chez Laban, a pastorale biblique by Charles Koechlin (57) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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June 11, 1925: La forêt païnne, a ballet by Charles Koechlin (57) to his own story, is performed completely for the first time, at the Théâtre des Arts Décoratifs, Paris. See 20 April 1922.
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July 6, 1925: The remains of Erik Satie are buried at Cimitière d'Arcueil-Cachan in Arcueil, Val-de-Marne, attended by Charles Koechlin (57), Albert Roussel (56), Maurice Ravel (50), Arthur Honegger (33), Germaine Tailleferre, Darius Milhaud (32), Georges Auric, Jean Cocteau, and Pierre Templier (his publisher and Mayor of Arcueil). But there are far more local townsfolk on hand than celebrities. One wreath of violets carries the inscription: “To M. Satie from his fellow tenants.”
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January 13, 1926: Sonata no.2 for clarinet and piano op.86 by Charles Koechlin (58) is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris.
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May 16, 1926: Sonatine française for piano duet op.60/1, 4 by Charles Koechlin (58) are performed for the first time, in Salle Albert Ier, Paris.
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May 17, 1926: The first two of the Huit mélodies sur des poèmes de ‘Shéhérazade’ de Tristan Klingsor op.84 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (58) are performed for the first time, in Salle Erard, Paris.
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January 4, 1927: Nouvelle sonatine op.87/2 for piano by Charles Koechlin (59) is performed for the first time, at the Université Mercereau, Paris.
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February 13, 1927: Nouvelle sonatine op.87/1 for piano by Charles Koechlin (59) is performed for the first time, at the Université Mercereau, Paris.
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March 16, 1927: Nouvelle sonatine op.87/4 for piano by Charles Koechlin (59) is performed for the first time, in the Salle des Concerts de l’Hôtel Majestic, Paris.
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March 24, 1927: Poème for horn and orchestra op.70bis by Charles Koechlin (59) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris. See 15 May 1925.
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May 6, 1927: Concerto for piano, clarinet, and string quartet by Roy Harris (29) is performed for the first time, in the Salle Gaveau, Paris by the Société Musicale Indépendante, Nadia Boulanger (39) at the keyboard. Also premiered is the Trio for flute, clarinet, and bassoon op.92 by Charles Koechlin (59).
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May 7, 1927: The third, sixth, and seventh of the Huit mélodies sur des poèmes de ‘Shéhérazade’ de Tristan Klingsor op.84 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (59) are performed for the first time, in Paris.
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May 23, 1927: Sur une poésie de Toulet op.104/1 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (59) is performed for the first time, in Salle des agriculteurs, Paris. Also premiered is Réponse d’une épouse sage for voice and piano by Albert Roussel (58) to words of Roché (after Giles), Maurice Ravel (52) at the piano.
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May 24, 1927: Divertissement for three flutes op.91 by Charles Koechlin (59) is performed for the first time, in Salle d’École Normale, Paris.
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February 15, 1928: Chanson d’amour op.5/3 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (60) to words of Bouilhet is performed for the first time, in Salle des agriculteurs, Paris, 35 years after it was composed.
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May 19, 1929: Two days before he is to set sail for America, Charles Koechlin (61) learns that he has won the Hollywood Bowl Prize for his 1910 composition La joie païenne.
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June 3, 1929: Nouvelle sonatine op.87/3 for piano by Charles Koechlin (61) is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris.
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August 13, 1929: La joie païenne op.46/5 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (61), the last part of Études antiques, is performed for the first time, in Hollywood Bowl.
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February 22, 1931: Vers la plage lointaine, nocturne op.43, a symphonic poem by Charles Koechlin (63), is performed for the first time, in Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt, Paris.
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March 25, 1931: Suite en quatuor op. 55 for flute, violin, viola, and piano by Charles Koechlin (63) is performed for the first time, in Salle de l’École Normale, Paris. Also premiered is La mort du nombre for soprano, tenor, violin, and piano by Olivier Messiaen (22) to his own words, the composer at the keyboard.
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January 3, 1932: The orchestration of the Sonatine française op.60/1-2 by Charles Koechlin (64) are performed for the first time, in Paris, conducted by the composer.
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February 2, 1932: The orchestration of the Sonatine française op.60/3 by Charles Koechlin (64) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Coloniale conducted by the composer.
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May 18, 1932: Six of the Vingt chansons bretonnes op.115 for cello and piano by Charles Koechlin (64) are performed for the first time, in the Salle de l’École Normale, Paris.
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November 29, 1932: Several works for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (65) are performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris: the symphonic poem La course de printemps op.95, Cinq chorals dans les modes du moyen-âge op.117bis, Fugue symphonique “Saint-Georges” op.121, and the second of the Trois fugues sur des sujets de Koechlin op.112.
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June 13, 1933: Novembre op.22/2 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (65) to words of Bourget is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris, the composer at the keyboard, 32 years after it was composed.
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December 4, 1933: The orchestration of the Sonatine française op.60/4 by Charles Koechlin (66) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Coloniale.
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December 20, 1933: Midi op.15/2 for voice and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (66) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed publicly for the first time, in Paris 33 years after it was composed. See 7 February 1906.
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March 15, 1934: Three of the Vingt chansons bretonnes op.115 for cello and piano by Charles Koechlin (66) are performed for the first time, in the Salle de l’École Normale, Paris.
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April 24, 1934: Quintet for piano and strings no.1 op.80 by Charles Koechlin (66) is performed for the first time, in Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels.
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June 13, 1934: Keep that schoolgirl complexion op.139/1 for voice, flute, and piano by Charles Koechlin (66) to his own words is performed for the first time, Darius Milhaud (41) at the keyboard. See 17 January 1986.
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September 15, 1934: La chute des étoiles op.40 for female chorus and piano by Charles Koechlin (66) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed for the first time, privately at the home of Mme J. Baignères in Paris. See 17 May 1955.
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April 8, 1935: Works for keyboard instruments by Charles Koechlin (67) are performed for the first time, at the Schola cantorum, Paris: Choral en fa mineur op.90bis for organ, the second and third of the Trois réalisations op.107/1 for organ, and seven of the twelve movements of L’ancienne maison de campagne op.124 for piano. Olivier Messiaen (26) is the organist. See 18 February 1939 and 1 July 1947.
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June 25, 1935: Tu crois au beau soleil op.147bis for winds by Charles Koechlin (67) is performed for the first time, in Jardin des Plantes, Paris.
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January 27, 1936: Tout va bien op.139/9 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (68) to his own words is performed for the first time, in Paris, the composer at the keyboard. See 17 January 1986.
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February 11, 1936: Works by Charles Koechlin (68) are performed for the first time, in Paris: Vocalise in G major, one of the 15 vocalises pour chant et piano dans tous les tons majeurs, the composer at the piano, and Sonatine modale for flute and clarinet op.155a.
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June 26, 1936: Hymne à la raison for chorus and winds by Charles Koechlin (68) to words of Rouget de Lisle is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris.
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June 28, 1936: La victoire op.153/3 for winds by Charles Koechlin (68) is performed for the first time, in the Stadium at Choisy-le-Roi to commemorate 100 years since the death of Rouget de Lisle. See 8 December 1961.
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July 14, 1936: Incidental music to Roland’s play Le quatorze juillet by Charles Koechlin (68), Albert Roussel (67), Jacques Ibert (45), Arthur Honegger (44), Darius Milhaud (43), Daniel Lazarus (38), and Georges Auric (37) is performed for the first time, in the Alhambra, Paris.
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March 1, 1937: Suite for two pianos op.6 by Charles Koechlin (69) is performed for the first time, in Salle Chopin, Paris 41 years after it was composed.
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March 21, 1937: Some works by Charles Koechlin (69) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Tour-Eiffel, originating at the Schola Cantorum, Paris: La divine vesprée op.67, a ballet to his own story, in a concert setting, and the first three of Quelques choeurs réligieux a cappella, de style modal op.150.
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July 18, 1937: Les eaux vives op.160 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (69) is performed for the first time, at the Exposition Universelle, Paris. A recording made earlier this month is broadcast over loudspeakers to accompany the “Fêtes de la lumière.”
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August 1, 1937: Over the next month and a half, Charles Koechlin (69) teaches harmony, counterpoint, fugue, and orchestration at Catherine Urner’s studio in San Diego.
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February 25, 1938: Sonata for bassoon and piano op.71 by Charles Koechlin (70) is performed for the first time, in Salle Cortot of the École Normale de Musique, Paris.
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June 14, 1938: Symphonie d’hymnes for chorus and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (70) is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris. It consists of Hymne à la nuit op.48/1, Hymne à la vie op.69, Hymne au jour op.110, Hymne au soleil op.127, and Hymne à la jeunesse op.148. Also premiered is his Choral: Final de la suite “les Saisons” op.69 for chorus, organ, and orchestra to his own words
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June 30, 1938: Victoire de la vie, a film with music by Charles Koechlin (70), is shown for the first time, at Port St. Cloud.
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February 18, 1939: Trois réalisations op.107/1 for organ by Charles Koechlin (71) is performed completely for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris. See 8 April 1935.
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July 16, 1941: Some of the 14 chants pour flûte et piano op.157 by Charles Koechlin (73) are performed for the first time, in Paris the composer at the keyboard. See 17 October 1985.
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March 17, 1943: Septuor à vent op.165 for flute, oboe, english horn, clarinet, alto saxophone, horn, and bassoon by Charles Koechlin (75) is performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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May 7, 1943: Two of the Trois sonatines pour flûte seule op.184/2-3 by Charles Koechlin (75) are performed for the first time, in the École Normale de Musique, Paris.
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June 10, 1943: The Primavera Quintet for flute, violin, viola, cello, and harp op.156 by Charles Koechlin (75) is performed for the first time, privately in Paris. See 14 March 1944.
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December 10, 1943: Choeurs monodiques op.169 for male chorus by Charles Koechlin (76) is performed for the first time, privately in a production of Alceste by Euripedes (tr. Marchand) in Paris. See 23 March 1952.
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March 14, 1944: The Primavera Quintet for flute, violin, viola, cello, and harp op.156 by Charles Koechlin (76) is performed publicly for the first time, at the École Normale de Musique, Paris. See 10 June 1943.
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December 14, 1944: Three of the Seven Stars’ Symphony op.132 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (77) is performed for the first time, in Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris and broadcast on French Radio. The three stars honored are Douglas Fairbanks, Clara Bow, and Charlie Chaplin. See 16 November 1969.
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January 29, 1945: Adagio pour orgue op.201 by Charles Koechlin (77) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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April 29, 1945: Seven of Les chants de Nectaire for flute op.198 by Charles Koechlin (77) are performed for the first time, in the Grand Amphithéâtre de la Sorbonne.
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July 4, 1945: Several works by Charles Koechlin (77) are performed for the first time, at the École Normale, Paris: Six of Les chants de Nectaire for flute op.198, Soir païen op.35/4 for voice and piano to words of Samain, and Il pleure dans mon coeur op.22/4 for voice and piano to words of Verlaine, 44 years after it was composed.
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March 5, 1946: Trio d’anches for oboe, clarinet, and bassoon op.206 by Charles Koechlin (78) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio-National.
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May 7, 1946: Six of Les chants de Nectaire for flute op.199 by Charles Koechlin (78) are performed for the first time, at the École Normale de Musique, Paris.
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September 13, 1946: Symphony no.1 by Charles Koechlin (78) is performed for the first time, in Brussels 31 years after it was composed.
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December 13, 1946: Three symphonic poems by Charles Koechlin (79) are performed for the first time, in Brussels: La méditation de Purun Bhagat op.159, La loi de la jungle op.175, and Les bandar-log op.176.
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May 2, 1947: Adagio pour orgue op.211 by Charles Koechlin (79) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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July 1, 1947: L’ancienne maison de campagne op.124 for piano by Charles Koechlin (79) is performed completely for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio. See 8 April 1935.
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December 8, 1947: Three of Les chants de Nectaire for flute op.200 by Charles Koechlin (80) are performed for the first time, in Paris.
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February 20, 1948: L’âme heureuse, a ballet by Charles Koechlin (80) cobbled together from earlier compositions to a scenario by Charrat, is performed for the first time, at the Opéra-Comique, Paris.
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January 14, 1949: Le Docteur Fabricius op.202, a symphonic poem by Charles Koechlin (81), is performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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March 12, 1949: Sonatine for piano op.59/1 by Charles Koechlin (81) is performed for the first time, in École Normale de Musique, Paris.
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April 8, 1949: Partita pour orchestre de chambre op.205 by Charles Koechlin (81) is performed for the first time, in Strasbourg.
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February 10, 1950: Ballade pour piano et orchestra op.50 by Charles Koechlin (82) is performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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August 5, 1950: Pièce pour orgue op.226 by Charles Koechlin (82) is performed for the first time, in Paris. It is his last known composition.
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December 31, 1950: Charles Louis Eugène Koechlin dies at his home in Le Canadel, Var, Republic of France, aged 83 years, one month, and four days.
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November 19, 1951: Le buisson ardent (part 1) op.203 and (part 2) op.171, symphonic poems by Charles Koechlin (†0), are performed for the first time, in Paris.
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December 20, 1951: Two of Les chants de Nectaire for flute op.200 by Charles Koechlin (†0) are performed for the first time, at the Schola Cantorum, Paris.
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March 23, 1952: Choeurs monodiques op.169 for male chorus by Charles Koechlin (†1) is performed publicly for the first time, in a production of Alceste by Euripedes (tr. Marchand) over the airwaves of French Radio III. See 10 December 1943.
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April 30, 1952: Six of the 15 préludes for piano op.209 by Charles Koechlin (†1) are performed for the first time, in the École Normale, Paris.
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May 21, 1952: Je suis jaloux, Psyché op.104/2 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (†1) is performed for the first time, in Salle Berlioz of the Conservatoire Nationale de Musique, Paris, 24 years after it was composed.
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August 29, 1952: Symphony no.2 by Charles Koechlin (†1) is performed for the first time, in Mexico City.
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October 21, 1952: Several works by Charles Koechlin (†1) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio-National originating in Paris: Sonate à sept op.221 for oboe, harpsichord or harp, flute, and string quartet, Second Quintet with harp op.223 for flute, harp, violin, viola, and cello, and eight of the 15 motets de style archaïque op.225. See 17 December 1993.
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November 28, 1953: Dissolution op.68/2 for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (†2) to words of Claudel is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio.
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March 2, 1954: Six of the Douze pastorales op.77 for piano by Charles Koechlin (†3) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Paris Inter, 34 years after they were composed. See 20 June 1982.
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February 26, 1955: Four of the 15 pièces pour cor et piano op.180/1, 9, 10, 13 by Charles Koechlin (†4) are performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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April 4, 1955: Two of the 12 petites pièces très faciles op.208 for piano by Charles Koechlin (†4) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3.
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May 17, 1955: La chute des étoiles op.40 for female chorus and piano by Charles Koechlin (†4) to words of Leconte de Lisle is performed publicly for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London. See 15 September 1934.
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May 27, 1955: Two of the 15 pièces pour cor et piano op.180/4, 12 by Charles Koechlin (†4) are performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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September 17, 1955: Four of the 15 pièces pour cor et piano op.180/3, 11, 14, 15 by Charles Koechlin (†4) are performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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March 13, 1956: Organ works by Charles Koechlin (†5) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio: Four of the 24 chorals sur de thèmes anciens op.82 and the second and twelfth of the 12 chorals sur des thèmes anciens op.136.
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October 21, 1956: Sept chansons pour Gladys op.151, a cycle for voice and piano by Charles Koechlin (†5) to his own words, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio III. The cycle was inspired by the performance of Lilian Harvey in the film Calais-Douvre.
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December 8, 1961: Quelques chorals pour des fêtes populairs op.153 for winds by Charles Koechlin (†10) are performed completely for the first time, in Salle Erard, Paris.
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January 16, 1962: La cité nouvelle, rêve d’avenir op.170, a symphonic poem by Charles Koechlin (†11), is performed for the first time, in Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris.
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March 14, 1962: Three of the 15 études pour alto saxophone et piano op.188 by Charles Koechlin (†11) are performed for the first time, in Brussels. See 18 February 1963.
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March 31, 1962: Several of the 20 sonneries pour trompes de chasse opp.123 and 142 by Charles Koechlin (†11) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of French Radio III.
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February 18, 1963: 15 études pour alto saxophone et piano op.188 by Charles Koechlin (†12) is performed completely for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio France III. See 14 March 1962.
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May 18, 1963: Epitaphe de Jean Harlow op.164 for flute, alto saxophone, and piano by Charles Koechlin (†12) is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre Municipal, Dijon 26 years after it was composed.
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June 23, 1963: Deux nocturnes op.32bis for flute, horn, and piano or harp by Charles Koechlin (†12) is performed for the first time, privately, at the home of M. Lerique, Verrières-le-Buisson. See 22 June 1965.
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June 22, 1965: Deux nocturnes op.32bis for flute, horn, and piano or harp by Charles Koechlin (†14) is performed publicly for the first time, at Sceaux. See 23 June 1963.
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November 16, 1969: Seven Stars’ Symphony op.132 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (†18) is performed completely for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC radio 3 and Radio France-Musique, 36 years after it was composed. The seven movements are 1. Douglas Fairbanks (du “Voleur de Bagdad”) 2. Lilian Harvey 3. Greta Garbo 4. Clara Bow et la joyeuse Californie 5. Marlene Dietrich 6. Emil Jannings (de “L’ange bleu”) 7. Charlie Chaplin (d’après “La ruée vers l’or”, “Circus” etc.). See 14 December 1944.
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April 19, 1970: Stèle funéraire op.224 for one person playing piccolo, flute, and alto flute by Charles Koechlin (†19) is performed for the first time, in Verrières-le-Buisson, 20 years after it was composed.
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February 12, 1971: Le voyage chimérique op.149/5 for flute and piano by Charles Koechlin (†20) is performed for the first time, in Lyons Concert Hall at the University of York, 36 years after it was composed. See 12 September 1986.
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June 7, 1972: Two works for piano by Charles Koechlin (†21) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3: La prière de l’homme op.149/8, 37 years after it was composed, and Danses pour Ginger op.163, five dances for piano in homage to Ginger Rogers, 35 years after it was composed. See 12 September 1986.
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May 19, 1973: Offrande musicale sur le nom de Bach op.187 for orchestra, organ and piano by Charles Koechlin (†22) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Frankfurt, 31 years after it was composed.
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November 25, 1974: Barcarolle monégasque op.149/4 for piano by Charles Koechlin (†23) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio France-Musique, 39 years after it was composed.
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December 15, 1981: Vers le soleil op.174, seven monodies for ondes martenot by Charles Koechlin (†30) is performed for the first time, at the École de Musique, Verrières-le-Buisson, 42 years after it was composed.
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June 17, 1982: Le repos de Tityre op.216/10 for oboe d’amore or clarinet or soprano saxophone by Charles Koechlin (†31) is performed for the first time, in Ville d’Avray, 34 years after it was composed.
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June 18, 1982: Two sonatinas for oboe d’amore (or soprano saxophone) and chamber orchestra op.194 by Charles Koechlin (†31) are performed for the first time, in Ville d’Avray, 39 years after they were composed.
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June 20, 1982: Works by Charles Koechlin (†31) are performed for the first time, in Ville d’Avray: Suite for piano duet op.19, 81 years after it was composed, Douze pastorales op.77 for piano (first complete) 62 years after they were composed, and the Sonata for clarinet and piano no.1 op.85 49 years after it was composed. See 2 March 1954.
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May 25, 1984: Works by Charles Koechlin (†33) are performed for the first time, in Kassel, 42 years after they were composed: Five of the 14 pièces pour hautbois et piano op.179, and Plainte. Nocturne, the third movement of the Suite pour cor anglais seul.
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October 17, 1985: 14 chants pour flûte et piano op.157 by Charles Koechlin (†34) is performed completely for the first time, over the airwaves of radio station WGBH in Boston, 49 years after they were composed. See 16 July 1941.
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January 17, 1986: Album de Lilian op.139 for voice, flute, and piano by Charles Koechlin (†35) is performed completely for the first time, in the Concert Hall of the Boston University School of Music, 52 years after it was composed. The suite is a commentary on the films of Lilian Harvey. See 13 June 1934 and 27 January 1936.
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September 12, 1986: Album de Lilian (second volume) op.149 for flute, ondes martenot, harpsichord, and piano by Charles Koechlin (†35) is performed completely for the first time, in Jordan Hall of the New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, 51 years after it was composed.
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December 21, 1986: Voyages-film dansé op.222, a ballet by Charles Koechlin (†35), is performed for the first time, in the Staatstheater, Kassel 39 years after it was arranged from previous compositions.
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August 22, 1987: Two works by Charles Koechlin (†36) are performed for the first time, in Adam’s Mark Hotel, St. Louis: Pastorale op.75bis for flute, clarinet, and piano, 66 years after it was composed and Pièce de flûte op.218, 39 years after it was composed.
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November 28, 1987: String Quartet no.2 by Charles Koechlin (†36) is performed for the first time, in the Glockenhaus, Lüneburg, 72 years after it was composed.
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February 18, 1993: Silhouettes de comédie op.193, twelve pieces for bassoon and orchestra by Charles Koechlin (†42), is performed for the first time, at the Bern Casino, 50 years after it was composed.
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June 16, 1993: Fugue sur un sujet d’Ernest Le Grand op.126 for string quartet by Charles Koechlin (†42) is performed for the first time, in Berlin 62 years after it was composed.
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December 17, 1993: 15 motets de style archïque op.225 by Charles Koechlin (†42) is performed completely for the first time, in the Stiftskirche, Stuttgart 44 years after it was composed. See 21 October 1952.
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October 8, 1995: L’Andalouse dans Barcelone op.134 for orchestra by Charles Koechlin (†44) is performed for the first time, in Berlin. It was composed in 1933 for a film called Cruises with the Squadron but this music was replaced at the last minute and was never heard in Koechlin’s lifetime.