A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Leos Janácek

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July 3, 1854: Leos Janácek is born in the schoolhouse in Hukvaldy, Margraviate of Moravia, Austrian Empire, the tenth of 14 children born to Jirí Janácek, a schoolteacher, organist, and pianist, and Amálie Grulichová, daughter of a tavern owner. Five of the 14 will not survive more than their first year. The child is christened Leo Eugen.
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May 1, 1859: Leos Janácek (4) begins attending his father’s school in Hukvaldy.
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July 12, 1866: Seven Weeks War: The entry of Prussian troops into Brünn (Brno) is witnessed by a choirboy named Leos Janácek (12).
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July 20, 1872: Leos Janácek (18) completes studies at the Teachers’ Institute in Brünn (Brno).
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July 24, 1872: Leos Janácek (18) receives a temporary certificate allowing him to teach provisionally in primary schools.
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March 1, 1873: Leos Janácek (18) begins duties as choirmaster of Svatopluk, a men’s society in Brünn (Brno).
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April 27, 1873: Three male choruses by Leos Janácek (18) are performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno): The Enforced Bridegroom, Serbian Folksong, and Ploughing under the direction of the composer in his conducting debut.
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July 5, 1873: War Song for male chorus and piano by Leos Janácek (19) to anonymous words is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer.
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November 9, 1873: The Fickleness of Love for male choir by Leos Janácek (19) to a traditional Moravian text is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer.
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March 14, 1874: Alone Without Comfort for male chorus by Leos Janácek (19) to a traditional Moravian text, is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer.
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September 6, 1874: Leos Janácek (20) conducts the choir of Svatopluk for the last time, in Slapanice.
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November 18, 1874: Leos Janácek (20) is awarded a certificate allowing him to teach in primary schools in either the Czech or German languages.
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April 4, 1875: Vltava (Die Moldau), a symphonic poem from Ma Vlast by Bedrich Smetana (51) is performed for the first time, before a Prague audience which includes Leos Janácek (20). “My memory of Smetana is like that of a child’s imagining God: in the clouds.” (Tyrrell I, 94)
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July 23, 1875: Chorale Fantasia for organ by Leos Janácek (21) is performed for the first time, by the composer during his final examination at the Prague Organ School.
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July 24, 1875: Leos Janácek (21) is awarded a final certificate from the Prague Organ School.
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October 21, 1875: Having returned from Prague, Leos Janácek (21) is once again asked to direct the choir of the men’s organization Svatopluk in Brünn (Brno).
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January 23, 1876: Two works by Leos Janácek (21) are performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno): True Love for male chorus to traditional Moravian words conducted by the composer, and If You Don’t Want Me, What is Left? for voice and piano to words of Celakovsky, the composer at the keyboard.
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February 3, 1876: Leos Janácek (21) is elected choirmaster of the Beseda Choral Society, Brünn (Brno).
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April 3, 1876: Choral Elegy for male chorus by Leos Janácek (21) to words of Celakovsky is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) conducted by the composer.
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August 30, 1876: Leos Janácek (22) officially becomes a teacher, but with no position.
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October 26, 1876: Leos Janácek (22) resigns as choir director of the men’s organization Svatopluk in Brünn (Brno).
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November 13, 1876: Death, a melodrama for reciter and orchestra by Leos Janácek (22) to words of Lermontov, is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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July 15, 1877: Festive Chorus for the laying of the foundation stone of the Teachers’ Institute by Leos Janácek (23) to words of Kucera is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) conducted by the composer.
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December 2, 1877: Suite for string orchestra by Leos Janácek (23) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer.
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August 7, 1878: The Regional School Board of Brünn (Brno) refuses a request by one of its teachers, Leos Janácek (24), to fund a trip to St. Petersburg to study with Anton Rubinstein (48).
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September 15, 1878: Festive Chorus for the consecration of the new building of the Imperial and Royal Slavonic Teachers’ Institute by Leos Janácek (24) to words possibly by Kucera is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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September 21, 1878: Regnum mundi for chorus and organ by Leos Janácek (24) is performed for the first time.
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December 8, 1878: Sarabande for string quartet by Leos Janácek (24) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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December 15, 1878: Idyll for string orchestra by Leos Janácek (24) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer. Antonín Dvorák (37) is in attendance at the invitation of the conductor.
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May 5, 1879: Leos Janácek (24) applies to the Ministry of Culture and Education in Vienna for an unpaid leave from his job at the Teachers Institute in Brünn (Brno) in order to seek further education in Vienna or Leipzig.
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September 8, 1879: Dumka for piano by Leos Janácek (25) is performed for the first time, in Roznov by the composer.
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October 2, 1879: One day after arriving in the city, Leos Janácek (25) passes his entrance examinations at Leipzig Conservatory.
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November 19, 1879: Leos Janácek (25) hears Anton Rubinstein (49) play for the first time, at Leipzig Conservatory. “I’ve not heard a greater artist! Not enormous technique, anyone can learn that, but his conception and rendition of compositions—that’s the real artist in him.” (Tyrrell I, 150)
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November 22, 1879: Leos Janácek (25) attends a concert devoted entirely to the chamber music of Anton Rubinstein (49) at Leipzig Conservatory, Rubinstein at the keyboard. “When I feel Rubinstein’s compositions I fell extraordinary: my spirit truly melts, it takes wing, becomes free and, at the moment when I listen to it, paints free pictures for itself…This verve, this speaking ‘to the soul’ I find nowhere else but in his compositions.” (Tyrrell I, 151).
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January 30, 1880: After four months at Leipzig Conservatory, Leos Janácek (25) writes to his girlfriend, Zdenka Schulzová, in Brünn (Brno). He can stand being separated from her no longer and is convinced he must transfer his studies elsewhere to be close to her. He will end up in Vienna, a few hours from her by train.
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February 14, 1880: The Vienna Conservatory informs Leos Janácek (25) that he may transfer his studies from Leipzig to Vienna for the current term ending 15 July.
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April 1, 1880: Leos Janácek (25) arrives in Vienna from Leipzig to attend the Conservatory of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde.
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May 14, 1880: The title of Imperial and Royal Music Teacher, conferred on Leos Janácek (25) provisionally in 1876, is made permanent by the Teacher’s Institute, Brünn (Brno).
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May 28, 1880: The second movement of the Violin Sonata no.2 by Leos Janácek (25) is performed for the first time, at the Vienna Conservatory as a possible entry in competition for the school’s annual Vereinsmedaille. The work is judged not good enough to be entered in competition.
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May 29, 1880: Leos Janácek (25) writes to the jury who yesterday rejected his violin sonata, asking that they hear it again, and giving four reasons why. In the end, he does not stay in Vienna long enough to hear a reply.
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July 1, 1880: The engagement of Leos Janácek (25) to his 14-year-old student Zdenka Schulzová is announced in Brünn (Brno).
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December 12, 1880: Autumn Song for male chorus by Leos Janácek (26) to words of Vrchlicky is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) directed by the composer.
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January 6, 1881: Menuetto a Scherzo for clarinet and piano by Leos Janácek (26) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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January 15, 1881: At a meeting of the Brno Beseda (choral society) committee, their director, Leos Janácek (26) hears complaints that he programs too much of his own music, to the detriment of other works. He calls this a lie and promptly resigns.
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June 4, 1881: The Association for the Promotion of Church Music in Moravia is approved by the Governor of Moravia. Its driving force is Leos Janácek (26).
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July 13, 1881: In the Old Town church in Brünn (Brno), Leos Janácek (27) marries his piano pupil Zdenka Schulzová, daughter of Emilian Schulz, director of the Teachers’ Institute of Brünn, shortly before her 16th birthday.
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December 7, 1881: Leos Janácek (27) is appointed the first director of the Organ School in Brünn (Brno). He is the driving force behind its creation.
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December 22, 1881: Leos Janácek (27) applies to the Brno Regional School Board to be transferred from his post at the Teachers’ Institute.
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January 16, 1882: The Brno Regional School Board responds to the request of Leos Janácek (27) of 22 December by telling him to wait for a vacancy and then apply for it.
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February 17, 1882: Leos Janácek (27) returns to his position with the Brno Beseda after a new committee requested he come back.
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August 15, 1882: Classes begin at the new Brno Organ School. Its first president is Leos Janácek (28).
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February 16, 1883: Leos Janácek’s (28) superior and father-in-law, Emilian Schulz, asks the Brünn (Brno) Regional School Council to begin disciplinary proceedings against him. Among the charges are rudeness, taking time off without permission, not completing his duties and “nationalist fanaticism giving an impression of madness.” Janácek is also in the middle of divorce proceedings with Schulz’s daughter. No action will be taken against him as the Council will judge it a family dispute.
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March 2, 1883: Emilian Schulz and his daughter, Zdenka Janáckova, go to the apartment of Leos Janácek (28) to pick up furniture and other items awarded her by the divorce court. Schulz and Janácek come to blows and the police are summoned and remain until Zdenka’s things are removed.
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April 18, 1883: Leos Janácek (28) writes a long letter to the Brno Regional School Board refuting accusations against him by his father-in-law Emilian Schulz. He also repeats his request for a transfer saying he can no longer work with Schulz.
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April 12, 1884: On Holy Saturday, Leos Janácek (29) attends supper with his estranged in-laws in Brünn (Brno). A grudging reconciliation is effected and it is decided that his wife, Zdenka, will return to live with him.
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December 13, 1884: The first issue of a new journal in Brünn (Brno) meant to review the productions at the new Czech Provisional Theatre appears today. It includes an opera review by Leos Janácek (30).
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March 8, 1885: Dumka for violin and piano by Leos Janácek (30) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), the composer at the piano.
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November 14, 1886: Two works for male chorus by Leos Janácek (32) to traditional Moravian words are performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) conducted by the composer: O Love and Ah, the war.
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January 1, 1887: An opera libretto called Sárka by Julius Zeyer appears in Ceská Thalie, a Czech journal devoted to theatrical matters, in the first of three installments. It will be read by a young composer named Leos Janácek (32) who is looking to write his first opera.
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November 10, 1887: A few months after completing his first opera, Sárka, Leos Janácek (33) writes to the author, Julus Zeyer for permission to use his words. Zeyer will refuse. See 17 November 1887 and 11 November 1925.
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November 17, 1887: In response to a second letter from Leos Janácek (33), Julius Zeyer refuses him permission to use his libretto Sárka. The composition of the opera is already completed.
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February 19, 1888: Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (47) conducts a very successful concert of his own music in Prague which includes the Piano Concerto no.1, the Violin Concerto, Romeo and Juliet, and the Overture 1812. In the audience is Leos Janácek (33) who will review the performance.
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June 8, 1888: The committee of the Brno Beseda writes to Leos Janácek (33) accepting his resignation as conductor.
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May 23, 1889: The Threat for male chorus by Leos Janácek (34) to traditional Moravian words is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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July 24, 1891: Rákos Rákoczy, a folk ballet by Leos Janácek (37) to a scenario by Herben, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Prague.
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November 20, 1892: I have sown green for chorus and orchestra by Leos Janácek (38) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) the composer conducting. Also performed is Janácek’s The mosquitoes got married for chorus and orchestra, perhaps for the first time, and the premiere of his orchestral arrangement of Dances from Haná.
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April 16, 1893: Music for Club Swinging for piano by Leos Janácek (38) is performed for the first time, at the annual display by the gymnastics organization Sokol in Brno.
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May 21, 1893: Our Birch Tree for male chorus by Leos Janácek (38) to words of Krásnohorská is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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February 10, 1894: The Beginning of a Romance, an opera by Leos Janácek (39) to words of Tichy after Preissová, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Brünn (Brno), conducted by the composer. Popular with the audience, the press is strongly divided. This is the only time Janácek conducts one of his operas (or any opera).
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May 13, 1894: The Sun has Risen Above that Hill for baritone, chorus and piano by Leos Janácek (39) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), the composer conducting.
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May 15, 1895: The Czecho-Slavonic Ethnographic Exhibition opens in Prague. It is a celebration of Czech culture. The man in charge of Moravian music is Leos Janácek (40).
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August 15, 1895: Today through 18 August are “Moravian Days” at the Czecho-Slavonic Ethonographic Exhibition in Prague. The array of orchestral, choral, and folk performers are all organized by Leos Janácek (41).
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October 28, 1895: The Czecho-Slavonic Ethnographic Exhibition closes in Prague. The celebration of Czech culture has seen 2,000,000 visitors over the last five months. The Moravian music section was the charge of Leos Janácek (41).
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April 19, 1896: Lord Have Mercy Upon Us for solo quartet and double choir by Leos Janácek (41) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno) conducted by the composer.
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July 18, 1896: Leos Janácek (42) crosses from Austrian to Russian territory for visits to St. Petersburg, Nizhny-Novgorod, and Moscow. He calls Russia “the mother of all the Slavs.”
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July 20, 1896: Leos Janácek (42) arrives in St. Petersburg on his two-week journey to Russia.
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July 28, 1896: After a stay of one week in St. Petersburg, Leos Janácek (42) arrives in Moscow.
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July 29, 1896: Leos Janácek (42) spends a day in Nizhny-Novgorod during his two-week visit to Russia.
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August 1, 1896: Leos Janácek (42) arrives home in Hukvaldy after a two-week trip to Russia.
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January 13, 1898: Lidové noviny informs its readers that a committee has been established in Brno to organize a Czech orchestra which will feature Czech composers. It is to be led by Leos Janácek (43).
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January 26, 1898: A new Russian circle holds its first meeting in Brno. Among those chosen for the committee is Leos Janácek (43).
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March 6, 1898: Spring Song for voice and piano by Leos Janácek (43) to words of Tichy is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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March 20, 1898: The Wild Dove, a symphonic poem by Antonín Dvorák (56), is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), conducted by Leos Janácek (43). On the same program, the epilogue to Amarus, a cantata by Leos Janácek to words of Vrchlicky, is performed for the first time. See 2 December 1900.
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April 24, 1898: Festive Chorus for dedicating the banner of the St. Joseph’s Union, for male voices by Leos Janácek (43) to words of Stasny is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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January 10, 1900: Two orchestral pieces, a Cossack Dance and a Serbian Kolo-round dance, both by Leos Janácek (45) are performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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December 2, 1900: The cantata Amarus, words by Vrchlicky and music by Leos Janácek (46) is performed for the first time, without the epilogue, at Kromeriz, the composer conducting. See 20 March 1898 and 25 February 1912.
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March 17, 1901: The Wild Duck, for mixed chorus, by Leos Janácek (46), is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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June 15, 1901: Our Father for tenor, mixed chorus, and piano, by Leos Janácek (46), is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno), under the direction of the composer.
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February 26, 1903: Olga Janácková, 20-year-old daughter of Leos Janácek (48), dies after a long illness in the Janácek’s home in Brünn (Brno). A servant recalls Janácek was “tearing his hair out, shouting ‘My soul, my soul!’...then depression overcame him; he just sat there taking no notice of anything.”
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March 18, 1903: Leos Janácek (48) completes the composition of his opera Jenufa. He composed it throughout the final illness of his daughter Olga.
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April 28, 1903: Gustav Schmoranz, the director of the National Theatre in Prague, informs Leos Janácek (48) that his new opera, Jenufa, could not be performed as it was “not good enough to be successful.” Janácek is stunned and falls into a depression of self-blame.
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May 21, 1903: Leos Janácek (48) witnesses a performance of Louise by Gustave Charpentier (42) in Prague. It will effect his work to the end of his life. He is taken by the use of prose, and what Janácek calls “speech melodies.”
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January 21, 1904: Her Foster Daughter, an opera by Leos Janácek (49) (known outside Czechoslovakia as Jenufa), with words adapted by the composer after Preissová, is performed for the first time, at the National Theatre, Brünn (Brno). It is dedicated to the memory of his daughter Olga who died during its composition. The opera is a critical success and a popular triumph. The composer is called to the stage after each act and the librettist acknowledges applause from her box. Janácek is carried on the shoulders of the singers to a victory party. See 23 April 1903 and 26 February 1903.
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April 30, 1904: Called in to save the ailing Warsaw Conservatory, Leos Janácek (49) meets with the directors and discusses his plans.
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May 1, 1904: Leos Janácek (49) misses a scheduled meeting with the Russian governor general in Warsaw. As a result, he will not be offered the post of director of the Warsaw Conservatory. He attends a concert in the evening. After the conductor announces the death of Antonín Dvorák, the audience rises and Dvorák’s Hussite Overture is played.
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July 5, 1904: A Romance for violin and piano by Leos Janácek (50) is performed for the first time, in Ivancice v Brna.
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April 9, 1905: Leos Janácek’s (50) Spring Song for solo voice and piano to words of Tichy (pseud. of Rypacek) is performed for the first time, at the Friends of Art Club, Brünn (Brno).
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July 25, 1905: Leos Janácek’s (51) chorus Ah, the War is performed in Spa, Belgium. It is the first time a work by Janácek is heard outside Bohemia or Moravia.
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November 26, 1905: Two choruses for male voices by Leos Janácek (51), If You Knew and The Evening Witch, both to words of Prikryl, are performed for the first time, in Prerov.
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January 7, 1906: Leos Janácek (51) presides of the first meeting of the folksong working group of the Club of the Friends of Art, Brno.
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January 27, 1906: Leos Janácek’s (51) Piano Sonata ‘1 October 1905’ “Street Scene” is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno). It was written in memory of a Czech worker killed in a clash between German and Czech citizens of Brno. During the final rehearsal the composer snatched the music from pianist Ludmilla Tuckova and burned the third movement on the spot. Tonight, only the first and second movements are performed. After a second, private performance, Janácek will throw the two other movements into the Vltava. Ms. Tuckova has copies, however, and the sonata will be published, with the composer’s blessing, in 1924.
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November 14, 1906: The overture to the opera Jenufa by Leos Janácek (52) is performed for the first time, under the name Jealousy, in Prague.
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February 5, 1907: Mosquitoes, for male chorus by Leos Janácek (52), is performed for the first time, in Vyskov.
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December 5, 1907: Leos Janácek’s (53) Folk Nocturnes for female chorus and piano, is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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February 23, 1908: Parting, for male chorus by Leos Janácek (53), is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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April 12, 1908: Marycka Magdónova, for male chorus by Leos Janácek (53) to words of Bezruc, is performed for the first time, in Prostejov.
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February 22, 1909: Leos Janácek (54) is named chair of the Club of the Friends of Art in Brno.
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April 2, 1909: A Piano Trio by Leos Janácek (54) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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October 29, 1909: Leos Janácek (55) receives a phonograph in Brno which he has ordered from Berlin. He and his colleagues will shortly put it to use collecting folksongs.
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March 13, 1910: The Fairy-Tale for cello and piano by Leos Janácek (55) is performed for the first time, in Brünn (Brno).
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May 27, 1911: Halfar the Schoolmaster for male chorus by Leos Janácek (56) is performed for the first time, in Pils (Plzen).
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February 25, 1912: The cantata Amarus, words by Vrchlicky and music by Leos Janácek (57) is performed completely for the first time, in Brünn (Brno). See 20 March 1898 and 2 December 1900.
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March 23, 1912: Cartak on the Solan, a cantata by Leos Janácek (57) to words of Kurt, is performed for the first time, in Prostejov.
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December 7, 1913: In the Mists for piano by Leos Janácek (59) is performed for the first time, in Kromeriz.
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March 25, 1914: The Seventy Thousand, for male chorus by Leos Janácek (59) to words of Bezruc, is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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July 27, 1914: Leos Janácek (60), in Valasska Bystrice, is determined not to return home and “let his holidays be ruined.” Nevertheless, when he hears a rumor that civilians will not be allowed to use trains, he returns immediately to Brünn (Brno).
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September 3, 1914: Unable to take a planned holiday at the Croatian resort of Crikvenica, due to the war, Leos Janácek (60) arrives at his usual spa of Luhacovice, Moravia.
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March 14, 1915: Austrian authorities inspect the archives of the Russian Circle in Brünn (Brno) while its chairman, Leos Janácek (60) watches. The circle was banned 9 March.
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May 26, 1916: Twelve years after its premiere in Brünn (Brno), Jenufa by Leos Janácek (61) is performed in the National Theatre in Prague for the first time. The evening is an enormous success, “probably the happiest day of my life.”
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July 10, 1916: According to Zdenka Janáckova, Leos Janácek (62) returns home to Brünn (Brno) from Prague and begins to berate her as the cause of all his troubles and an obstacle to his creativity. Tonight she takes an overdose of Veronal and morphine. She will be hospitalized for a week but will survive.
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July 23, 1916: The Wolf’s Trail for female chorus and piano by Leos Janácek (62) to words of Vrchlicky, is performed for the first time, in Luhacovice.
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September 25, 1916: Having effectively “moved out” of their house in Brünn (Brno), Leos Janácek (62) sends a note to his wife Zdenka, “Spare me and spare yourself. I’m in such an excited state that I can’t talk to you calmly about our affairs. Dr. Rudis (his lawyer) will visit you at 11 tomorrow.” (Tyrrell II, 104) The two have been feuding over Janácek’s liaison with the singer Gabriela Horvátová.
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December 26, 1916: Golden Lane, the first of the Songs of Hradcany by Leos Janácek (62) for soprano, female chorus, flute, and harp, to words of Procházka, is performed for the first time, in Smetana Hall, Prague.
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January 19, 1917: A document is drawn up in Brünn (Brno) entitled “Minutes of the negotiations between Mr. Leos Janácek, musical composer in Brno, and Mrs. Zdenka Janácková, née Schulzová, wife of the same, in the presence of their representatives, Dr. Felix Rudis and Dr. Ludvík Hanf, solicitors in Brno.” (Tyrrell II, 142) Not exactly a divorce, it clears up the ambiguous relationship between the two.
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February 5, 1917: Leos Janácek’s (62) cantata The Eternal Gospel, to words of Vrchlicky, is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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November 14, 1917: Leos Janácek’s (63) orchestral work The Fiddler’s Child is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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December 5, 1917: Leos Janácek (63) writes to the singer Gabriela Horvátová, “I don’t read the papers after the terrible revolution in Russia. Two Jews are ruling 160 million Slavs. That’s really terrible…Days of suffering await us-but heads up!” (Tyrrell II, 193)
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February 16, 1918: In spite of parliamentary inquiries about spending tax money on some Czech nationalist, Jenufa by Leos Janácek (63) is produced at the Vienna Hofoper. With many nobility and important officials present, it is a great success.
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April 30, 1918: On about this date, Leos Janácek (63) is physically attacked outside his office by the deranged caretaker of the Brno Organ School. He is not seriously hurt and the woman becomes lucid and asks forgiveness.
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May 27, 1918: Leos Janácek (63) falls in front of a tram in Brünn (Brno) and is pulled off the tracks in the nick of time. “Just a hair’s breadth and my hands would have been run over!” (Tyrell II, 241)
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August 3, 1918: Schoolmaster Halfar, for male chorus by Leos Janácek (64) to words of Bezruc, is performed for the first time, in Luhacovice.
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November 16, 1918: Otto Klemperer conducts the first German performance of Leos Janácek’s (64) Jenufa in Cologne. He has to fight a chorus opposed to singing a Slavic work, journalists who wonder why a Czech work is being performed “when our Austrian brothers have to suffer so much from the effrontery of uncultured Slavs”, the privations of post-war Germany, and a half-empty hall. Nevertheless, the work is a success.
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November 24, 1918: Belvedere, the third of the Songs of Hradcany by Leos Janácek (62) for soprano, female chorus, flute, and harp, to words of Procházka, is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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April 24, 1919: A delegation from the Brno National Theatre meets with President Masaryk in Prague to discuss the turnover of the German Theatre in Brno to the Czechs. Among the committee is Leos Janácek (64) who is meeting the President for the first time.
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September 25, 1919: Leos Janácek (65) is nominated as professor of the master class in composition at Prague Conservatory, with residence in Brno.
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March 21, 1920: The Ballad of Blanik, a symphonic poem by Leos Janácek (65), is performed for the first time, in Brno. The response is mixed.
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April 23, 1920: The Excursions of Mr. Broucek, an opera in two parts (Mr. Broucek’s Excursion to the Moon and Mr. Broucek’s Excursion to the Fifteenth Century) by Leos Janácek (65) to words of Gellner, Dyk, Prochazka, and the composer after Cech, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Prague. It is not a success.
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September 26, 1920: The Czech Legion for male chorus by Leos Janácek (65) to words of Horák is performed for the first time, in Kromeriz.
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December 29, 1920: Emil Hertzka of Universal Edition writes to Leos Janácek (66) that they will not publish his book on harmony.
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April 6, 1921: Kaspar Rucky, for soprano soloist and female chorus by Leos Janácek (66) to words of Praházka, is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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April 18, 1921: The Diary of the Young Man Who Disappeared, a song cycle by Leos Janácek (66) to anonymous words, for alto and tenor soloists, female chorus, and piano, is performed for the first time, in Reduta Theatre, Brno.
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October 9, 1921: Leos Janácek (67) writes to the married Kamila Stösslová that her love for her husband was the motivation for his opera Kát’a Kabanová.
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October 9, 1921: Leos Janácek’s (67) symphonic rhapsody Taras Bulba is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Brno. It is a success.
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November 23, 1921: Kát’a Kabanová, an opera by Leos Janácek (67) to his own words after Ostrovsky, is performed for the first time, at the National Theatre, Brno.
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April 24, 1922: Sonata for violin and piano by Leos Janácek (67) is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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December 10, 1922: Leos Janácek (68) goes to see a new play by Karel Capek called The Makropulos Affair in the Vinohrady Theatre, Prague.
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February 3, 1923: At a performance of Paul Hindemith’s (27) String Quartet op.22 in Prague, the composer meets Leos Janácek (68) for the first time. Janácek gives him a copy of his Violin Sonata and within a few days, Hindemith will give the German premiere of the piece, in Frankfurt.
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February 27, 1923: Karel Capek informs Leos Janácek (68) that, due to contract restrictions, his play The Makropulos Affair, may not be set to music for ten years.
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May 11, 1923: Songs of Hradcany by Leos Janácek (62) for soprano, female chorus, flute, and harp, to words of Procházka, is performed completely for the first time, in Prague. This includes the first performance of The Weeping Fountain. See 26 December 1916 and 24 November 1918.
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September 21, 1924: The Wandering Madman for soprano and male chorus by Leos Janácek (70) to words of Tagore is performed for the first time, in Rosice v Brna, near Brno.
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October 17, 1924: Leos Janácek’s (70) String Quartet no.1 is performed for the first time, in Prague.
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October 21, 1924: Youth for wind sextet by Leos Janácek (70) is performed for the first time, in Brno. The premiere is something of a fiasco. One key on the clarinet does not work. At the conclusion of the piece Janácek rushes on stage and tells his audience that the music they just heard was not composed by him. Subsequent performances are more successful.
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November 6, 1924: The Cunning Little Vixen, an opera by Leos Janácek (70) to words of Tesnohlidek, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Brno.
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December 2, 1924: Lachian Dances for orchestra by Leos Janácek (70) is performed for the first time, in Brno. It is a hit. The audience calls for two of them to be encored. See 19 February 1925.
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December 8, 1924: A gala performance of the music of Leos Janácek (70) takes place in Prague as part of celebrations surrounding the 70th year since his birth. He is presented to President Tomás Masaryk in the presidential box.
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January 10, 1925: While Béla Bartók (42) is in Prague to perform some of his works, he meets Leos Janácek (70) for the first time. They spend a good part of the evening discussing Slovak folksongs.
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January 28, 1925: Leos Janácek (70) is awarded a doctorate from Masaryk University in Brno. Henceforth he signs all his works “Dr.Ph. Leos Janácek.”
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February 19, 1925: Lachian Dances by Leos Janácek (70) is performed for the first time, as a ballet in Brno. See 2 December 1924.
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October 26, 1925: The first version of Nursery Rhymes for nine voices and ten players by Leos Janácek (71) is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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October 27, 1925: The Czechoslovak Ministry of Education and National Culture informs Leos Janácek (71) that his opera The Cunning Little Vixen has been awarded the state prize of 10,000 korunas.
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November 11, 1925: Sarka, an opera by Leos Janácek (71) to words of Zeyer, is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Brno.
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November 30, 1925: The Czech Academy informs Leos Janácek (71) that he has won a prize of 5,000 korunas for his two chamber works String Quartet no.1 and Youth.
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January 24, 1926: A bust of Leos Janácek (71) by Jan Stursa is unveiled at the Brno National Theatre. “…a bust like that suggests that it’s done for the future—when the living one will be no more. It saddened me.” (Tyrrell II, 587)
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February 16, 1926: Concertino for piano, 2 violins, viola, clarinet, bassoon, and horn by Leos Janácek (71) is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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April 9, 1926: Henry Cowell (29) gives a performance of his works in Brno at the invitation of the Club of Moravian Composers. While in Brno, Cowell makes the acquaintance of Leos Janácek (71) and the two have long conversations. Cowell will tell Janácek “that you are without doubt one of the very greatest of living composers, without reservations.”
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April 28, 1926: Leos Janácek (71) departs Prague making for London.
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April 29, 1926: Leos Janácek (71) arrives in London where his music will be performed.
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May 6, 1926: A concert of the music of Leos Janácek (71) in London at Wigmore Hall, with the composer in attendance, takes place during a country-wide general strike. There is no public transportation, no programs, and no reviews. Although the audience is less than full, their response is enthusiastic.
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May 8, 1926: After ten days of music, meetings, and sightseeing, Leos Janácek (71) departs London for home.
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June 26, 1926: Sinfonietta for orchestra by Leos Janácek (71) is performed for the first time, in Smetana Hall, Prague.
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July 11, 1926: With accompanying celebrations (despite some rain), a plaque is unveiled at the birthplace of Leos Janácek (72) in Hukvaldy, Czechoslovakia.
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October 16, 1926: Our Flag for two sopranos and male chorus by Leos Janácek (72) to words of Prochazka is performed for the first time, in Prerov.
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December 18, 1926: The Makropulos Affair, an opera by Leos Janácek (72) to his own words after Capek, is performed for the first time, at the National Theatre, Brno. It is a success.
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February 10, 1927: Leos Janácek (72), Arnold Schoenberg (52), and Paul Hindemith (31) are inducted into the Prussian Academy of Arts.
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April 11, 1927: King Albert of Belgium creates Leos Janácek (72) a commander of the order of King Leopold.
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November 10, 1927: At a gala dinner after he conducts a performance of Aida in Brno, Pietro Mascagni (63) meets Leos Janácek (73).
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December 5, 1927: The Glagolitic Mass, for vocal soloists, chorus, orchestra, and organ by Leos Janácek (73) to church slavonic texts organized by Weingart, is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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March 2, 1928: Capriccio for piano-left hand, flute, two trumpets, three trombones, and tuba by Leos Janácek (73) is performed for the first time, in Smetana Hall, Prague.
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May 23, 1928: The electricity that Leos Janácek (73) is having installed in his cottage in Hukvaldy becomes operational today.
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May 25, 1928: The Moravian Quartet give the first full performance of the String Quartet no.2 “Intimate Letters” by Leos Janácek (73) for the composer at his home in Brno. See 7 September 1928 and 11 September 1928.
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June 9, 1928: The Chorus for the Stone-laying Ceremony at Masaryk University in Brno, by Leos Janácek (73) to words of Tryb, is performed for the first time, in Brno. President Tomás Masaryk lays the stone himself with Janácek “only five steps away from the President.” (Tyrrell II, 876)
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July 30, 1928: Leos Janácek (74) departs Brno to spend a few weeks at his cottage in Hukvaldy with his long time confidant Kamila Stösslová and her son. Her mother has recently died. As he leaves his wife she feels “this is the beginning of the end” of their marriage. In fact, they will never see each other again.
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August 10, 1928: Leos Janácek (74), suffering from pneumonia, is taken from his home in Hukvaldy to a hospital in the nearest large town, Moravská Ostrava.
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August 12, 1928: Kamila Stösslová, Leos Janácek’s (74) long time confidant, sends a telegram to his wife, Zdenka, in Brno: “Maestro seriously ill, come immediately, sanatorium Dr. Klein.”

10:00 Leos Janácek dies at the sanatorium of Dr. Leopold Klein in Moravská Ostrava of pneumonia, aged 74 years, one month, and nine days.

Zdenka receives another telegram with the news of his death. She persuades the singer Stanislav Tauber to accompany her to Moravská Ostrava. On the trip she recounts to him all the sordid details of their marriage.

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August 15, 1928: A funeral for Leos Janácek is held in the Augustinian Church in Staré Brno attended by large crowds and important people. After the religious service, the coffin is brought to the theatre where the body lies in state in the lobby. The final scene from The Cunning Little Vixen is performed along with part of the Requiem by Antonín Dvorák (†24). The final remains are interred at the Brno Central Cemetery where there is a short religious service followed by the national anthem.
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September 7, 1928: String Quartet no.2 “Intimate Letters” by Leos Janácek (†0) is performed for critics in Brno. See 25 May 1928 and 11 September 1928.
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September 11, 1928: String Quartet no.2 “Intimate Letters” by Leos Janácek (†0) is performed publicly for the first time, in Brno. See 25 May 1928 and 7 September 1928.
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September 23, 1928: The Suite for Orchestra op.3 by Leos Janácek (†0) is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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April 12, 1930: From the House of the Dead, an opera by Leos Janácek (†1) to his own words after Dostoyevsky is performed for the first time, in the National Theatre, Brno. The libretto of this version is revised by Zitek, the music revised and reorchestrated by Chlubna and Bakala.
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December 11, 1930: The first known performance of Our Song for chorus by Leos Janácek (†2) to words of Cech takes place over the airwaves of Czechoslovak Radio, Brno.
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December 20, 1930: Elegy on the Death of Our Daughter Olga, a cantata by Leos Janácek (†2) to words of Veveritsa, is performed for the first time, in Brno. Also performed is Janácek’s orchestral Adagio (possibly composed around 1890) probably for the first time.
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March 13, 1934: Excerpts from Fate, an opera by Leos Janácek (†5) to words of Bartosová and the composer, are heard for the first time, broadcast over Brno Radio
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September 18, 1934: Fate, an opera by Leos Janácek (†6) to words of Bartosová and the composer, is performed completely for the first time, over the airwaves of Brno Radio. See 13 March 1934, 25 October 1958, and 8 September 1984.
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September 22, 1936: The epilogue from Leos Janácek’s (†8) opera The Excursion of Mr. Broucek to the Moon is performed for the first time, over Prague Radio.
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February 20, 1941: Adagio for Orchestra by Leos Janácek (†12) is performed for the first time before a live audience, in Brno. The work was already broadcast over Czechoslovak Radio-Brno in 1930.
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April 9, 1941: The Jealous Man for male chorus by Leos Janácek (†12) is performed for the first time, in Vizovice.
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March 7, 1943: The unfinished Mass in E flat for chorus and organ by Leos Janácek (†14) is performed for the first time, in the Church of Sts. Cyril and Methodius, Brno-Zidenice.
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October 18, 1943: Hail Mary for tenor chorus, violin, and organ by Leos Janácek (†15) is performed, likely for the first time, in the Church of Saints Cyril and Methodius, Brno-Zidenice, 39 years after it was composed.
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April 13, 1947: The first known performance of Veni sancte spiritus for male chorus by Leos Janácek (†18) takes place over the airwaves of Czechoslovak Radio Brno, about 44 years after it was composed.
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June 15, 1948: A Presto for cello and piano by Leos Janácek (†19) is performed for the first time, in Brno 38 years after it was composed.
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September 1, 1956: Two choruses for male voices by Leos Janácek (†28) to words of Krásnohorská, are performed for the first time, in Prerov: The Little Dove and Leave-Taking, 68 years after they were composed.
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December 1, 1957: Two male choruses by Leos Janácek (†29) are performed for the first time, in Prague, approximately 75 years after they were composed: On the Bushy Fir Tree Two Pigeons are Perched, and On the Ferry.
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October 18, 1958: An Intrada for four violins by Leos Janácek (†30) is performed for the first time, in Brno.
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October 24, 1958: Two works for organ by Leos Janácek (†30) are performed for the first time, in Brno: Overture and Lyre for Full Organ.
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October 25, 1958: A seriously revised version of Leos Janácek’s (†30) opera Fate: Destiny, to words of Bartosova and the composer, is staged for the first time, at the National Theatre, Brno. See 18 September 1934.
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September 13, 1979: Incidental music to Hauptmann’s play Schluck und Jau by Leos Janácek (†51) is performed for the first time, in Prague, 51 years after it was composed.
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September 8, 1984: The original version of Fate, an opera by Leos Janácek (†56) to words of Bartosová and the composer, is staged for the first time, in London 79 years after it was composed. See 18 September 1934.
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September 29, 1988: A Violin Concerto by Leos Janácek (†60) is performed for the first time, in Brno 62 years after it was composed.