A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Charles Ives

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October 20, 1874: Charles Edward Ives is born in the family house at 210 Main Street in Danbury, Connecticut, USA, first of two children born to George E. Ives, bandmaster and choir director, and Mary Elizabeth Smith Parmalee, daughter of a storekeeper.
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May 11, 1887: Charles Ives (12) gives his first public performance on the piano in a student recital in Danbury, Connecticut.
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January 16, 1888: Holiday Quickstep for piccolo, two cornets, two violins, and piano by Charles Ives (13) is performed for the first time, in Taylor’s Opera House, Danbury, Connecticut by the theatre orchestra directed by the composer’s father.
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October 20, 1888: Charles Ives enters duties as organist at the First Baptist Church, Danbury, Connecticut on his 14th birthday.
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February 10, 1889: Charles Ives (14) plays his first regular church service as organist at the Second Congregational Church in Danbury, Connecticut.
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February 21, 1889: I Think of Thee, My God for chorus by Charles Ives (14) to words of Monsell is performed for the first time, in Brewster, New York.
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May 21, 1889: Charles Ives (14) begins his first organ lessons, with JR Hall in Danbury, Connecticut.
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October 20, 1889: Charles Ives plays his first regular church service as organist at the Baptist Church in Danbury, Connecticut. It is his fifteenth birthday.
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October 22, 1889: Charles Ives (15) begins organ lessons with his second teacher, Alexander Gibson, in Danbury, Connecticut.
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May 8, 1891: Variations on America for organ by Charles Ives (16) is performed for the first time, in the Baptist Church of Danbury, Connecticut, by the composer. It is programmed as National Airs for Violin and Organ and is performed with a violinist.
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April 17, 1892: Easter Carol for solo voices, chorus, and organ by Charles Ives (17) to words of Elliott is performed for the first time, in Danbury Baptist Church, Connecticut. (This might not have happened.)
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December 11, 1892: I Come to Thee, for chorus and organ by Charles Ives (18) to words of Elliott, is performed for the first time, in Danbury Baptist Church, Connecticut.
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April 30, 1893: Rock of Ages, a song by Charles Ives (18) to words of Toplady, is performed for the first time, in Danbury, Connecticut. It is his last Sunday service at the Baptist Church.
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May 7, 1893: Charles Ives (18) is appointed organist at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, New Haven, Connecticut.
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August 22, 1893: In his visit to the Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Charles Ives (18) attends the first of the “largely popular” orchestral concerts.
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September 2, 1893: Charles Ives (18) attends a recital by the organist Alexandre Guilmant at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Guilmant is the first organist of his level to visit America and will be highly influential to American organists. Ives’ experience in Chicago inspires him to compose more and to seek publishers for his music.
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April 3, 1894: Charles Ives (19) pitches a baseball game for Hopkins Grammar School in which they defeat a team of Yale University freshmen.
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April 29, 1894: Charles Ives (19) plays his last service as organist of St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church in Danbury, Connecticut.
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September 30, 1894: Charles Ives (19) enters duties as organist at Center Church on the Green, New Haven, Connecticut.
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October 3, 1894: Charles Ives (19) enters Yale University.
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November 4, 1894: Just before midnight. Charles Ives’ (20) father George suffers a stroke and dies instantly in Danbury, Connecticut.
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June 4, 1895: The Light That is Felt for bass, chorus, and organ by Charles Ives (20) to words of Whittier is performed for the first time, in Center Church on the Green, New Haven.
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March 4, 1897: March “Intercollegiate” with “Annie Lisle” for band by Charles Ives (22) is performed for the first time, in Washington.
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May 28, 1897: Hells Bells: “Hail to Phi”, a fraternity show by Charles Ives (22) to words of Hinsdale, is performed for the first time, in New Haven, Connecticut.
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December 1, 1897: The Bells of Yale for baritone, male chorus, piano, and violin by Charles Ives (23) is performed for the first time, in South Norwalk, Connecticut.
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June 29, 1898: 700 students receive degrees at the commencement exercises at Yale University. Among them is Charles Ives (23).
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May 15, 1901: An Old Flame, a song by Charles Ives (26) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York.
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December 16, 1901: Largo for violin and organ by Charles Ives (27) is performed for the first time, in Central Presbyterian Church, New York, the composer at the organ.
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February 16, 1902: Anthem: Religion for vocal quartet and organ by Charles Ives (27) is performed for the first time, in Central Presbyterian Church, New York.
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April 18, 1902: The cantata The Celestial Country by Charles Ives (27) to words of Alford, is performed for the first time, at New York’s Central Presbyterian Church, the composer directing from the organ.
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April 23, 1902: A review of the performance of Charles Ives’ (27) The Celestial Country five days ago appears in The Musical Courier. Although a generally positive review, Ives writes across his copy “Damn rot and worse.” It is only the second of two times that a performance of his work is reviewed before 1924.
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June 1, 1902: Charles Ives (27) leaves his position as organist at New York’s Central Presbyterian Church, donating his anthems and organ music to the church. When the church moves in 1915, these works will be discarded.
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January 1, 1907: Charles Ives (32) begins a general agency called Ives & Co. for Washington Life Insurance Co. of New York. His assistant is Julian Myrick.
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October 21, 1907: Charles Ives (32) travels from New York to Hartford, intent on professing his love to Harmony Twichell.
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October 22, 1907: While on a walk near Farmington, Connecticut, Charles Ives (33) and Harmony Twichell, a registered nurse, profess their love for each other and decide to marry.
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June 9, 1908: Charles Ives (33) is married to Harmony Twichell in Asylum Hill Congregational Church in Hartford, Connecticut by her father, the minister there. They will honeymoon in the Berkshires and then live in New York.
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January 1, 1909: The insurance firm of Ives (34) and Myrick is formed as agents of the Mutual Insurance Company.
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April 20, 1909: A pregnant Harmony Ives, wife of Charles Ives (34), suffers bleeding and is rushed to a New York hospital where she loses the baby and undergoes an emergency hysterectomy. She will be hospitalized until 15 May.
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March 19, 1910: Walter Damrosch and the New York Symphony read through the last three movements of Charles Ives’ (35) First Symphony in New York. Unable to negotiate the three against two in the second movement, Damrosch advises Ives to “make up your mind.” See 26 April 1953.
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October 4, 1914: Violinist Franz Milcke attempts to play through Charles Ives’ (39) Violin Sonata no.1, accompanied by the composer, at the Ives home in West Redding, Connecticut. He fails.
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May 7, 1915: Upon hearing the news of the Lusitania, a group of commuters at the Hanover Square Station of New York’s Third Avenue Elevated Railroad, prompted by a nearby hurdy-gurdy, begins spontaneously to sing In the Sweet Bye and Bye. One of the commuters is an insurance executive named Charles Ives (40) who will commemorate the event in his Second Orchestral Set.
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April 15, 1917: In Flanders Fields, a song for voice and piano by Charles Ives (42) to words of McCrae, is performed for the first time, at a luncheon of the insurance firm of Ives and Myrick at the Waldorf-Astoria, New York.
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April 22, 1917: Sonata no.3 for violin and piano by Charles Ives (42) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Chamber Music Hall, New York.
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October 1, 1918: Charles Ives (43) spends the day arguing with other members of the Liberty Bond Committee in the Manhattan Hotel, New York. Ives is able to persuade them to accept a $50 bond so less affluent people could participate in the war effort. That night, he suffers a heart attack brought on by stress and diabetes. Too sick to be moved, he will remain in the hotel for a week.
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April 2, 1921: A review by A. Walter Kramer of the private publication by Charles Ives (46) of his Second Pianoforte Sonata “Concord, Mass. 1840-1860” and Essays Before a Sonata appears in Musical America. “And it is without doubt the most startling conglomeration of meaningless notes that we have ever seen engraved on white paper...”
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August 3, 1921: The Alcotts movement from the Piano Sonata no.2 by Charles Ives (46) is performed for the first time, in Hartford, Connecticut.
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June 8, 1922: Three songs by Charles Ives (47) are performed for the first time, in St. James Parish House, Danbury, Connecticut: Ilmenau, to words of Goethe, The White Gulls to words of Morris, and Spring Song to words of his wife, Harmony Twichell.
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November 22, 1922: Du alte Mutter, a song by Charles Ives (48) to words of Vinje (tr. Lobedanz), is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 28, 1922: Two songs by Charles Ives (48) are performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York: A Night Thought to words of Moore, and My Dear Old Mother to words of Vinje (tr. Corder).
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January 17, 1924: Charlie Rutlage, a song by Charles Ives (49) to words of O’Malley, is performed for the first time, in New Orleans.
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February 28, 1924: The Greatest Man, a song by Charles Ives (49) to words of Collins, is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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March 18, 1924: The Second Violin Sonata by Charles Ives (49) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, New York.
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February 8, 1925: The third of the Three Quarter-Tone Pieces for piano four hands by Charles Ives (50) is performed for the first time, in Chickering Hall, New York.
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February 14, 1925: The second and possibly the first of the Three Quarter-Tone Pieces for two pianos by Charles Ives (50) are performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, New York.
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January 29, 1927: At the International Referendum Concert of the Franco-American Music Society in Town Hall, New York, the first two movements of Charles Ives' (52) Symphony no.4 are heard for the first time, causing a riot in the audience. One member of that audience, Darius Milhaud (34), there to hear his own work performed, is much taken with Ives' music and decides to have lunch with him. George Gershwin (28) is also there but his attempts to contact Ives go unanswered. This marks the first time that the music of Charles Ives is seriously considered by important critics. See 10 May 1933 and 26 April 1965.
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July 27, 1927: In Menlo Park, California, Henry Cowell (30) writes to Charles Ives (52) for the first time. He asks Ives to subscribe to his nascent journal New Music Quarterly, asks to see Ives’ music, and offers him honorary membership and a seat on the board of the New Music Society. See 16 August 1927.
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August 16, 1927: Charles Ives (52) writes to Henry Cowell (30), responding favorably to his letter of 27 July.
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March 5, 1928: The Emerson movement from the Sonata for Piano no.2 “Concord, Mass., 1840-1860” by Charles Ives (53) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the Sorbonne Station of the Radio Institute of Paris.
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October 30, 1928: The Celestial Railroad for piano by Charles Ives (54) is performed for the first time, at the Institute of History and Art in Albany, New York.
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November 27, 1928: The First Violin Sonata of Charles Ives (54) is performed on a concert of the New Music Society in San Francisco, programmed by Henry Cowell (31).
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December 12, 1928: Thoreau from the Piano Sonata no.2 by Charles Ives (54) is performed for the first time, in Hartford, Connecticut.
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March 15, 1929: Two songs by Charles Ives (54) are performed for the first time, in Carnegie Chamber Music Hall, New York: Serenity, to words of Whittier, and The Things Our Fathers Loved to his own words.
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January 1, 1930: Charles Ives (55), in poor health since his 1918 heart attack, retires from the insurance business on disability.
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April 21, 1930: The first concert of the Pan-American Association of Composers, led by Henry Cowell (33) takes place in Carnegie Chamber Hall (Weill Recital Hall), New York. It includes the premieres of Set no.8 for chamber orchestra by Charles Ives (55) and Rat Riddles, a song for alto, oboe, percussion, and piano by Ruth Crawford (28) to words of Sandburg. Also on the program is music by Carlos Chávez (30), Dane Rudhyar (35), Henry Brant (16) and Cowell.
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January 6, 1931: The first of the Four Transcriptions from “Emerson” for piano by Charles Ives (56) is performed for the first time, at the inauguration of a new auditorium for the New School for Social Research, New York. See 12 March 1948.
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January 10, 1931: Three Places in New England by Charles Ives (56) is performed publicly for the first time, in Town Hall, New York. The composer is in attendance. During a performance of Carl Ruggles’ (54) Men and Mountains Ives tells a hissing audience member to “...stand up and use your ears like a man...”
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June 6, 1931: Orchesterstück: Synchrony, by Henry Cowell (34) is performed for the first time, in Salle Gaveau, Paris under the name Synchrony of Dance, Music, Light. Also premiered is the version for full orchestra of Carl Ruggles’ (55) Men and Mountains. Attending is Ruth Crawford (29) on her Guggenheim fellowship. It is an important concert of American moderns, introducing Europe to the music of Ives (56), Varèse (47), and Ruggles, all conducted by Nicholas Slonimsky. See 7 December 1924.
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September 3, 1931: Washington’s Birthday for orchestra by Charles Ives (56) is performed for the first time, in the Community Playhouse, San Francisco 23 years after it was composed.
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December 7, 1931: In the Night from the Set for Theatre Orchestra by Charles Ives (57) is performed for the first time, in St. Paul, Minnesota. See 16 February 1932.
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December 27, 1931: Decoration Day for orchestra by Charles Ives (57) is performed for the first time, in the Teatro Nacional, Havana.
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February 16, 1932: Set for Theatre or Chamber Orchestra by Charles Ives (57) is performed completely for the first time, in the New School for Social Research, New York, 26 years after it was composed. See 7 December 1931.
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February 21, 1932: Two works by American composers are performed for the first time, in the Salle Pleyel, Paris: The Fourth of July by Charles Ives (57) and Two Appositions: One Movement for Orchestra by Henry Cowell (34).
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February 25, 1932: Sun-Treader, a symphonic poem by Carl Ruggles (55), is performed for the first time, in Salle Pleyel, Paris. The critics are mixed. During rehearsals, many musicians rebelled, claiming the work is unplayable and unmusical. They were finally quieted through the considerable effort of Edgard Varèse (48). Extra rehearsals became necessary. After a plea from the conductor, Nicholas Slonimsky, funds were cabled by Charles Ives (57).
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March 1, 1932: Rough Wind, a song by Charles Ives (57) to words of Shelley, is performed for the first time, at the New School for Social Research in New York.
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March 5, 1932: Nicolas Slonimsky conducts an all-American program with the Berlin Philharmonic. Works performed include Three Places in New England by Charles Ives (57), Sun Treader by Carl Ruggles (55), Arcana by Edgar Varese (48), and Synchrony by Henry Cowell (34). The audience showers the performers with boos and whistles.
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March 11, 1932: The New River, a song by Charles Ives (57) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Förster-Dresdner Haus in Dresden.
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May 1, 1932: Several songs by Charles Ives (57) are performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York: The See’r and Walking to his own words, Evening to words of Milton, Maple Leaves to words of Aldrich, and The Indians to words of Sprague. The pianist is Aaron Copland (31). Also premiered is the Serenade for string quartet by Marc Blitzstein (27). In the audience is Elliott Carter (23).
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February 6, 1933: Three songs by Charles Ives (58) are performed for the first time, in Steinway Hall, New York: Afterglow to words of Cooper, Like a Sick Eagle to words of Keats, and Ann Street to words of Morris.
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May 10, 1933: The third movement of Symphony no.4 by Charles Ives (58) is performed for the first time, in New York. See 29 January 1927 and 26 April 1965.
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September 26, 1933: Three songs by Charles Ives (58) are performed for the first time, at the studio of Doris Barr in San Francisco: General William Booth Enters Into Heaven to words of Lindsay, Swimmers to words of Untermeyer, and Hymn to words of Wesley after Tersteegen.
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October 1, 1933: Concerto for string sextet by Roy Harris (35) is performed for the first time, at the Yaddo Estate, Saratoga Springs, New York. Also premiered is Charles Ives’ (58) song Where the eagle cannot see to words of Turnbull. The pianist in the Ives is Aaron Copland (32).
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November 13, 1933: Grantchester, a song by Charles Ives (59) to words of Brooke, is performed for the first time, in New York.
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February 15, 1934: Premonitions, a song by Charles Ives (59) to words of Johnson, is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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April 15, 1934: At a concert of the Pan-American Association of Composers, Ecuatorial, a prayer from Popol Yuh of Maya Quiché (tr. Jimines) for bass, eight brass instruments, piano, organ, two theremins, and six percussionists by Edgard Varèse (50), is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York. The theremins, much too loud, drown out everything else. Varèse will later replace them with ondes martenots. On the same program are premieres of two works by Charles Ives (59): The New River, for unison chorus and orchestra to words of the composer, and December for unison chorus, brass, and winds to words of DG Rossetti after Folgore da San Geminiano. It has been over 20 years since Ives composed the two pieces.
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April 19, 1934: Thoreau, a song by Charles Ives (59) to his own words after Thoreau, is performed for the first time, in Skinner Recital Hall of Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York.
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April 22, 1934: Three works by Charles Ives (59) are performed for the first time, in the Alvin Theatre, New York: The Gong on the Hook and Ladder/Firemen’s Parade on Main Street for small orchestra, Hallowe’en for string quartet and piano, and The Pond for orchestra, and piano.

Meanwhile, in Boston, Ives’ song for voice and piano Vita to words of Manilius is performed for the first time.

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February 15, 1935: Three songs by Charles Ives (60) are performed for the first time, in Vienna: At the River, to words of Lowry, Immortality to his own words, and The Children’s Hour to words of Longfellow.
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March 5, 1936: Several songs by Charles Ives (61) are performed for the first time, in the concert hall of the Schola Cantorum, Paris: The Innate, Resolution, and Majority, all to his own words, Requiem to words of Stevenson, and Paracelsus to words of Browning. Olivier Messiaen (27) is at the piano.
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November 17, 1936: At Sea, a song by Charles Ives (62) to words of Johnson, is performed for the first time, in Steinway Concert Hall, New York.
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May 6, 1937: A setting of Psalm 67 for chorus by Charles Ives (62) is performed for the first time, in the Theatre of Music, New York 43 years after it was composed.
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May 11, 1938: Three Improvisations for piano by Charles Ives (63) is performed for the first time, in a recording session in New York.
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June 21, 1938: Piano Sonata no.2 “Concord, Mass., 1840-1860” by Charles Ives (63) is performed completely for the first time, in a private setting in Stamford, Connecticut. See 28 November 1938 and 20 January 1939.
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November 28, 1938: Piano Sonata no.2 “Concord, Mass., 1840-1860” by Charles Ives (64) is performed completely and publicly for the first time, before a small audience in The Old House, Cos Cob, Connecticut. The only important critic in attendance, Paul Rosenfeld, will publish a very favorable review in Modern Music which will help secure Ives’ fame. See 21 June 1938 and 20 January 1939.
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January 20, 1939: The “official” premiere of Piano Sonata no.2 “Concord, Mass., 1840-1860” by Charles Ives (64) takes place in Town Hall, New York. The critics are generally tepid or negative. See 21 June 1938 and 28 November 1938.
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January 21, 1939: Lawrence Gilman publishes a review of last night’s concert in the New York Herald Tribune. He calls Charles Ives (64) “probably the most original and extraordinary of American composers”, and his Concord Sonata, “the greatest music composed by an American.”
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February 24, 1939: Several songs by Charles Ives (64) are performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York: Autumn, to words of his wife, Harmony Twichell, Berceuse, The Side Show and Down East to his own words, and Two Little Flowers to words of both Ives and his wife. John Kirkpatrick also reprises the Concord Sonata. Due to the recent notoriety of Ives’ music given by the critic Lawrence Gilman, the hall is filled.
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April 28, 1939: West London, a song by Charles Ives (64) to words of Arnold, is performed for the first time, at the Fine Arts Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado.
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January 14, 1940: Charles Ives’ (65) Fourth Violin Sonata “Children’s Day at the Camp Meeting” is performed for the first time, at the Museum of Modern Art in New York 24 years after it was composed.
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January 18, 1940: Two songs by Charles Ives (65) are performed for the first time, in Danbury, Connecticut: He is There! and In the Alley, both to his own words.
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March 30, 1940: Night of Frost in May, a song by Charles Ives (65) to words of Meredith, is performed for the first time, at the Dalcroze School of Music in New York.
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April 23, 1940: A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map op.15 for male chorus and timpani by Samuel Barber (30) to words of Spender is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the NBC Radio Network, originating in Casimir Hall of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia the composer conducting. Also premiered is Charles Ives’ (65) song 1, 2, 3 to his own words.
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September 18, 1941: Charles Ives (66) writes to Henry Cowell (44) congratulating him on his recent engagement. His original shock and horror at Cowell’s crime has abated.
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February 1, 1942: A Christmas Carol, a song by Charles Ives (67) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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April 19, 1942: Canon (II), a song by Charles Ives (67) to words of Moore, is performed for the first time, at the Humphrey-Weidman Studio in New York.
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November 2, 1942: The Last Reader, a song by Charles Ives (68) to words of Holmes, is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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March 17, 1943: The last three movements of String Quartet no.1: From the Salvation Army by Charles Ives (68) are performed for the first time, in a broadcast performance originating in New York. See 24 April 1957.
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May 3, 1943: Harpalus, a song by Charles Ives (68) to anonymous words, is performed for the first time, at the YMCA Assembly Hall in Houston.
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January 18, 1944: Three songs by Charles Ives (69) are performed for the first time, in the Minneapolis Institute of the Arts: A Farewell to Land to words of Byron, Tolerance to words of Kipling, and Song for Harvest Season to words of Phillimore.
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December 20, 1945: Charles Ives (71) is notified that he has been elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters, even though most of the music he wrote during his most fertile period, 1896-1918, has never been performed.
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December 27, 1945: Charles Ives (71) and William Schuman (35) are formally elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters.
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April 5, 1946: Symphony no.3 “The Camp Meeting” for small orchestra by Charles Ives (71) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Chamber Music Hall, New York, conducted by Lou Harrison (28) 44 years after it was composed. The work will win the 1947 Pulitzer Prize. Also premiered is Harrison’s Motet for the Day of Ascension for chamber orchestra conducted by the composer.
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May 11, 1946: Two Contemplations for small orchestra (The Unanswered Question (revised version) and Central Park in the Dark) by Charles Ives (71) are performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University, New York, 40 years after they were composed. See 17 March 1984. Also premiered is Ives’ song The Housatonic at Stockbridge to words of Johnson. (There is some evidence that Central Park in the Dark was performed around 1906 in a much cut-down instrumentation.)
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September 15, 1946: Second String Quartet by Charles Ives (71) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York 33 years after it was written. In the same concert, Hymn and Fuguing Tune no.5 arranged for string orchestra by Henry Cowell (49) is performed for the first time. See 14 April 1946.
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November 12, 1946: Feldeinsamkeit, a song by Charles Ives (72) to words of Allmers, is performed for the first time, in Royce Hall Auditorium at UCLA.
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February 19, 1947: After years of correspondence and championing of his work, Lou Harrison (29) meets Charles Ives (72) for the first time, in Danbury, Connecticut. Ives asks Harrison to edit his complete works.
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February 21, 1947: Slugging a Vampire, a song by Charles Ives (72) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Times Hall, New York.
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May 5, 1947: It is announced that Charles Ives (72) has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his Symphony no.3, completed around 1911. Ives writes to the man who conducted the premiere last year, Lou Harrison (29), “As you are very much to blame for getting me into that Pulitzer Prize street, and for having a bushel of letters to answer and for having a check of $500 thrown over me by the Trustees of Colum. Uni. you have got to help me by taking 1/2 of this...and the rest I’ll send to the New Music Edition and Arrow Press.” See 5 April 1946.
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March 3, 1948: Three Harvest Home Chorales for chorus, brass, timpani, and organ by Charles Ives (73) to words of Burgess, Gurney, and Alford, are performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York, approximately 50 years after they were composed.
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March 12, 1948: Four Transcriptions from Emerson for piano by Charles Ives (73) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York approximately 30 years after it was composed.
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May 24, 1948: Trio for violin, cello, and piano by Charles Ives (73) is performed for the first time, at Baldwin-Wallace College, Berea, Ohio, 45 years after it was composed.
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February 17, 1949: First Piano Sonata by Charles Ives (74) is performed for the first time, in the YMHA Hall, New York, 40 years after the composer finished it.
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April 25, 1949: Three-Page Sonata for piano by Charles Ives (74) is performed for the first time, in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 44 years after it was composed.
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April 29, 1949: Memories: a. Very Pleasant, b. Rather Sad, a song by Charles Ives (74) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Pittsburgh.
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December 27, 1949: Three songs by Charles Ives (75) are performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre at Columbia University: Chanson de Florian to words of Florian, The Rainbow (So May It Be!) to words of Wordsworth, and Lincoln, the Great Commoner to words of Markham. On the same program is the premiere of Piano Sonata no.4 by Vincent Persichetti (34).
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February 10, 1950: A Night Song, a song by Charles Ives (75) to words of Moore, is performed for the first time, at the Juilliard School of Music, New York.
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March 28, 1950: Two songs by Charles Ives (75) are performed for the first time, at the Milwaukee Art Institute: At Parting to words of Peterson, and Ich grolle nicht to words of Heine.
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April 3, 1950: Two piano works by Charles Ives (75) are performed for the first time, in New York: The Anti-Abolitionist Riots and Some Southpaw Pitching (studies nos.9 and 21), over 40 years after they were composed.
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May 15, 1950: When stars are in the quiet skies, a song by Charles Ives (75) to words of Bulwer-Lytton, is performed for the first time, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.
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August 10, 1950: Tone Roads no.1 for orchestra by Charles Ives (75) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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February 22, 1951: Symphony no.2 by Charles Ives (76) is performed for the first time, in New York, conducted by Leonard Bernstein (32) 50 years after it was completed by the composer. See 4 March 1951.
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March 4, 1951: Charles Ives (76) hears a radio rebroadcast of the premiere of his Symphony no.2, at the home of a neighbor in West Redding, Connecticut. It is the first time he has heard the work which he completed in 1901. See 22 February 1951.
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April 2, 1951: Aeschylus and Sophocles, a song for solo voice, piano, and string quartet by Charles Ives (76) to words of Landor, is performed for the first time, at Wilshire Ebell Chamber Music Hall in Los Angeles.
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May 10, 1951: Three works by Charles Ives (76) are performed for the first time, in New York: Allegretto sombreoso from Set no.1 for chamber orchestra; Luck and Work from Set no.3 for chamber orchestra; and Largo for violin, clarinet, and piano. See 6 December 1962.
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April 26, 1953: Symphony no.1 by Charles Ives (78) is performed for the first time, in Washington, 55 years after it was completed by the composer. See 19 March 1910.
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April 9, 1954: In the first complete performance of Charles Ives’ (79) Holidays Symphony, Thanksgiving or Forefather’s Day is performed for the first time, in Minneapolis, 50 years after it was composed.
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May 19, 1954: Charles Edward Ives dies in Roosevelt Hospital, New York, New York, USA, of a stroke suffered after a double hernia operation, aged 79 years, six months, and 29 days.
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May 21, 1954: Funeral services in memory of Charles Ives take place at his West Redding, Connecticut home. Presiding is his brother-in-law, Rev. Joseph Hooker Twichell. His neighbor, Luemily Ryder, plays Ives’ Prelude on Eventide on the upright piano. His mortal remains are laid to rest in Wooster Cemetery, Danbury, Connecticut.
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May 29, 1955: Mirage, a song by Charles Ives (†1) to words of Rossetti, is performed for the first time, at the First Unitarian Society of Minneapolis.
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February 22, 1956: Calcium Light Night from Set no.1 for chamber orchestra by Charles Ives (†1), edited and arranged by Henry Cowell (58), is performed for the first time, in Sprague Memorial Hall, Yale University. Also premiered are Ives’ songs No More to words of Whittier, There is a certain garden, Yellow Leaves to words of Bellamann, and A Sea Dirge to words of Shakespeare.
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October 14, 1956: Robert Browning Overture for orchestra by Charles Ives (†2) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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April 24, 1957: First String Quartet “From the Salvation Army” by Charles Ives (†2) is performed completely for the first time, in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 61 years after it was composed. See 17 March 1943,
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May 4, 1958: Largo Risoluto nos.1 and 2 for string quartet and piano by Charles Ives (†3) are performed for the first time, in the National Gallery of Art, Washington.
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June 17, 1959: Two songs by Charles Ives (†5) are performed for the first time, at Bennington College in Bennington, Vermont: Nov. 2, 1920 (An Election), to his own words, and Romanzo (di Central Park) to words of Hunt.
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October 19, 1959: He is There for unison chorus and orchestra by Charles Ives (†5) to his own words is performed for the first time, in the Norwalk High School Auditorium, Norwalk, Connecticut.
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June 2, 1960: Tarrant Moss, a song by Charles Ives (†6) to words of Kipling, is performed for the first time, in New Haven.
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September 7, 1961: Three songs by Charles Ives (†7) are performed for the first time, in Sprague Memorial Hall of Yale University: Sunrise to his own words, The Light That Is Felt to words of Whittier, and On Judges’ Walk to words of Symons.
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April 11, 1962: Abide with Me, a song by Charles Ives (†7) to words of Lyte, is performed for the first time, at the National Institute of Arts and Letters in New York.
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November 1, 1962: Two songs by Charles Ives (†8) are performed for the first time, at the Philadelphia Art Alliance: The Cage and Soliloquy, both to his own words.
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December 6, 1962: Two orchestral works by Charles Ives (†8) are performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York: Set no.3 for chamber orchestra (first complete), finished in 1918 and Chromâtimelôdtune, completed in 1919 and realized by Gunther Schuller (37). See 10 May 1951.
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April 26, 1963: From the Steeples and the Mountains for trumpet, trombone, and four sets of bells by Charles Ives (†8) is performed for the first time, at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts.
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May 11, 1963: Three songs by Charles Ives (†8) are performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre of Columbia University: On the Antipodes and Tom Sails Away, both to his own words, and September to words of Rossetti after Folgore.
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December 20, 1963: Tone Roads no.3 for orchestra by Charles Ives (†9) is performed for the first time, in New York, about 50 years after it was composed. Also premiered is Ives’ Scherzo: Over the Pavements for piccolo, clarinet, bassoon/baritone saxophone, trumpet, three trombones, cymbal, bass drum, and piano.
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February 5, 1965: Cradle Song, a song by Charles Ives (†10) to words of AL Ives, is performed for the first time, in the Alma Gluck Concert Hall, New York.
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February 7, 1965: Two songs by Charles Ives (†10) are performed for the first time, in Temple Emmanu-El Dallas: Luck and Work to words of Johnson, and Duty to words of Emerson.
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February 8, 1965: A Set of Three Short Pieces for string quartet and other instruments by Charles Ives (†10) is performed for the first time, in Crouse Auditorium of Syracuse University. Also premiered is Ives’ Waltz-Rondo for piano.
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April 26, 1965: Symphony no.4 by Charles Ives (†10) for orchestra and chorus ad.lib. is performed for the first time, in New York almost 50 years after it was completed. Present for the occasion is Hans Werner Henze (38). See 29 January 1927 and 10 May 1933.
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June 17, 1965: Old Home Days, a song by Charles Ives (†10) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Royal College of Music, London.
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March 25, 1966: Processional: Let There Be Light for chorus and various instruments by Charles Ives (†10) to words of Ellerton, is performed for the first time, in Danbury, Connecticut. Also premiered is Ives’ They are There! for unison chorus and orchestra, in a piano reduction, and the song Allegro to his own words. See 16 October 1967.
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April 18, 1966: Four psalm settings for chorus by Charles Ives (†10) are performed for the first time, in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art: Psalms 54, 90, 100, and 150. Also premiered is Ives’ General William Booth Enters into Heaven for male chorus and chamber orchestra to words of Lindsay, Two Slants for chorus and orchestra to words of Emerson and Manilius, and Walt Whitman for chorus and chamber orchestra to words of Whitman.
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August 5, 1966: Chamber Concerto no.2 (Homage to Charles Ives) for flute/piccolo/alto flute, clarinet/bass clarinet, violin/viola, cello, and piano by Thea Musgrave (38) is performed for the first time, in Dartington, Devon.
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November 5, 1966: The Circus Band, a song by Charles Ives (†12) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Sprague Hall, Yale University.
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November 21, 1966: Piano Study no.8 by Charles Ives (†12) is performed for the first time, in New Haven.
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February 11, 1967: The Orchestral Set no. 2 by Charles Ives (†12) is performed for the first time, in Orchestra Hall, Chicago.
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March 17, 1967: Four songs by Charles Ives (†12) are performed for the first time, in the high school auditorium in Danbury, Connecticut: Elégie, to words of Gallet, Songs my mother taught me to words of Heyduk (tr. Macfarran), The World’s Wanderers to words of Shelley, and Omens and Oracles.
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May 18, 1967: Varied Air and Variations for piano by Charles Ives (†12) is performed for the first time, in Sprague Memorial Hall, Yale University.
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October 16, 1967: Three works for male chorus and orchestra by Charles Ives (†13) are performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York: An Election and The Masses to his own words and Lincoln, the Great Commoner to words of Markham. Also premiered is the chorus and orchestra version of They are There! See 25 March 1966.
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October 24, 1967: Psalm 25 for chorus by Charles Ives (†13) is performed for the first time, in the Arts and Industries Building of the Smithsonian, Washington 66 years after it was composed.
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March 1, 1968: Kären, a song by Charles Ives (†13) to words of Ploug (tr. Kappey), is performed for the first time, in the Great Hall of Jonathan Edwards College, Yale University.
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March 23, 1968: Set of Five Take-Offs for piano by Charles Ives (†13) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York 62 years after it was completed. Also premiered are Ives’ piano studies nos.1-2, 5-7, 15, 20, and 23 over 40 years after they were composed.
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January 8, 1969: Julian Myrick dies of heart disease in New York at the age of 88. In 1907 he founded an insurance agency with Charles Ives (†14).
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April 11, 1969: The Rainbow for small orchestra by Charles Ives (†14) is performed for the first time, in Danbury, Connecticut, 55 years after it was composed.
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February 11, 1970: In Re Con Moto et al. for string quartet and piano by Charles Ives (†15) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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July 23, 1970: At the Tomb of Charles Ives for trombone, two psalteries, two dulcimers, three harps, tam-tam, five violins, viola, cello, and bass by Lou Harrison (53) is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado.
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November 29, 1970: Two works for orchestra by Charles Ives (†16), realized by Gunther Schuller (45), are performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York: The Yale-Princeton Football Game, probably composed in 1898, and The General Slocum, completed in 1904.
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June 6, 1971: Postlude in F for small orchestra by Charles Ives (†17) is performed for the first time, in Sprague Memorial Hall, Yale University.
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February 5, 1972: Fantasia on Jerusalem the Golden for band by Charles Ives (†17) arranged by Brion is performed for the first time, in West Caldwell, New Jersey.
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October 14, 1973: Serenade for chorus by Charles Ives (†19) to words of Longfellow is performed for the first time, in Battell Chapel, Yale University.
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October 19, 1973: March no.3, with My Old Kentucky Home for small orchestra by Charles Ives (†19) is performed for the first time, at Yale University. Also premiered is Ives’ Decoration Day for violin and piano and the song They Are There! to his own words.
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March 3, 1974: Several works for chamber orchestra by Charles Ives (†19) are performed for the first time, at Yale University, during the centennial year of his birth: Charlie Rutlage from Set no.5, Mists and Evening from Set no.6, Swimmers and The Pond from Set no.7 (realized by Sinclair and Singleton), March no.2 with Son of a Gambolier, Country Band March, and Overture and March 1776. Also premiered are Ives’ Fugue in Four Keys on The Shining Shore for flute, cornet, and strings, and An Old Song Deranged for chamber ensemble.
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April 21, 1974: Variations on Jerusalem the Golden for organ by Charles Ives (†19) is performed for the first time, during the centennial year of his birth, at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis approximately 86 years after it was composed.
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August 17, 1974: Four works for orchestra by Charles Ives (†20), realized by Singleton, are performed for the first time, in West Redding, Connecticut: March: The Circus Band, Skit for Danbury Fair, Take-Off no.7: Mike Donlin-Johnny Evers, and Take-Off no.8: Willy Keeler at Bat. It is the centennial year of his birth.
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October 18, 1974: Lord God, Thy Sea is Mighty for chorus and organ by Charles Ives (†20) is performed for the first time, in Hunter College Playhouse, New York two days before the centennial of his birth.
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October 20, 1974: Johnny Poe for male chorus and orchestra by Charles Ives (†20) to words of Low is performed for the first time, in Gusman Philharmonic Hall, Miami on the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth. The work was composed in 1925.
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October 20, 1974: Matthew Arnold from Set no.4 for small orchestra by Charles Ives (†20), realized by Kirkpatrick, is performed for the first time, in Woolsey Hall at Yale University on the 100th anniversary of the birth of the composer.
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October 21, 1974: Several works by Charles Ives (†20) are performed for the first time, in Sprague Hall, Yale University, one day after the centennial of his birth: Sneak Thief for unison chorus, trumpet, and piano four-hands to words of the composer, The Boys in Blue for male chorus, the Ragtime Dances nos.2 and 4, A Song of Mory’s for chorus to words of Merrill, the incomplete March no.3 in F and C, March no.4 in F and C, and Prelude on Eventide for baritone/trombone, two violins/echo organ, and organ. Also premiered today are four of Ives’ works for organ: Canzonetta in F, Fugue in c minor, Fugue in E flat, and Interludes for Hymns, in Center Church on the Green, New Haven, Connecticut.
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February 16, 1975: Two works for piano by Charles Ives (†20) are performed for the first time, in New York: March no.6 with Here’s to Good Old Yale and Invention in D.
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February 25, 1976: Ragtime Dance no.3 for small orchestra by Charles Ives (†21) is performed for the first time, in Sprague Hall, Yale University, over 70 years after it was composed.
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April 22, 1976: Ragtime Dance no.1 by Charles Ives (†21) is performed for the first time, in New Haven.
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November 18, 1977: Runaway Horse on Main Street for band by Charles Ives (†23) realized by Sinclair is performed for the first time, in New Haven.
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March 16, 1978: The first movement of the Orchestral Set no.3 by Charles Ives (†23), realized by Porter, is performed for the first time, at California State University at Fullerton.
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February 18, 1982: Phantasmagoria, a Fantasy for narrator, magnetic tape, digital synthesizer, and orchestra by Larry Austin (51) arranged from the Universe Symphony of Charles Ives (†27) is performed for the first time, at North Texas State University, Denton.
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March 17, 1984: The four Ragtime Dances for small orchestra by Charles Ives (†29) are given their first complete performance, in New York 80 years after they were composed. Also premiered is the original version of The Unanswered Question . See 11 May 1946.
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November 9, 1985: The Rocks on the Mountain Begin to Shout by Lukas Foss (63) after Ives (†31) is performed for the first time, in St. Peter’s Church, New York.
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April 19, 1991: Piano Study no.16 by Charles Ives (†36) is performed for the first time, at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.
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October 29, 1993: The Prelude no.1 and Section A of the Universe Symphony by Charles Ives (†39) edited by Porter, are performed for the first time, in Montfort Concert Hall, Greeley, Colorado. Also premiered is the original version of movements one and three from Three Places in New England. See 28 January 1994 and 6 June 1996.
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January 28, 1994: The first complete performance of the Universe Symphony by Charles Ives (†39), in a realization by Larry Austin (63), takes place in Cincinnati. See 29 October 1993 and 6 June 1996.
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February 25, 1996: Henry Brant’s (82) orchestration of the Concord Sonata of Charles Ives (†41) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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June 6, 1996: The Universe Symphony of Charles Ives (†42), realized by Reinhard, is performed for the first time, in New York. See 29 October 1993 and 28 January 1994.
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October 1, 1998: Emerson Overture for piano and orchestra by Charles Ives (†44) (realized by Porter) is performed for the first time, in Severance Hall, Cleveland.
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April 30, 2003: My Father Knew Charles Ives for orchestra by John Adams (56) is performed for the first time, in Davies Hall, San Francisco.