A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Johann Nepomuk Hummel

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November 14, 1778: Johann Nepomuk Hummel is born at Huttergasse 50 (now Klobunická 2) in Pressburg (Bratislava), Kingdom of Hungary, the only child of Johannes Hummel, violinist and conductor, and Margaretha Sommer, widow of a wig maker.
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March 10, 1789: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (10) performs a Mozart (33) piano concerto (perhaps K.503), his Variations on “Lison dormait” K.264 and a set of original variations at a concert in Dresden.
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May 23, 1789: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (33) hears Johann Nepomuk Hummel (10) play in Berlin.
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October 28, 1789: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (10) gives a performance at the home of Landgraf Wilhelm IX in Weissenstein.
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December 5, 1789: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (11) gives a performance before 50 people at a “Women’s Club” in Celle.
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April 20, 1792: In the eighth Haydn-Salomon concert in London, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (13) plays the piano part in Joseph Haydn’s (60) Piano Trio in Ab Hob.XVI: 14. It is the first known public performance of a piano trio by Haydn.
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May 29, 1793: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (14) gives a performance at the summer home of Elector Maximilian Franz in Münster.
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November 18, 1796: Now studying with Antonio Salieri (46) and Johann Georg Albrechtsberger (60) in Vienna, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (18) gives a concert in Pressburg (Bratislava).
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May 2, 1798: Publication of three sonatas op.5 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (19) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung. Nos. 1 and 2 are for piano and violin. No.3 is for piano and viola.
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February 9, 1799: Publication of three fugues for piano op.7 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (20) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 21, 1799: Dankgefühl einer Geretteten, a monodrama by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (20) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 28, 1799: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (20) gives a musical academy at the Augarten, Vienna to benefit victims of recent floods.
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August 17, 1803: Publication of the Piano Trio op.12 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (24) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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October 1, 1803: Publication of the Variations for piano and flute op.14 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (24) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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January 1, 1804: Concerto for trumpet and orchestra by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (25) is performed for the first time, for Prince Esterházy in Vienna.
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January 12, 1804: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (25) signs a contract to serve as Konzertmeister to Prince Nikolas Esterházy at Eisenstadt.
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April 1, 1804: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (25) enters upon duties as Konzertmeister to Prince Nikolas Esterházy at Eisenstadt. Effectively, he performs the duties of Kapellmeister, although Franz Joseph Haydn (72) still holds the title.
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June 20, 1804: Publication of the Variations for piano op.10 and the Rondo for piano op.11 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (25) is advertised in the Wiener Zeitung.
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June 23, 1804: Although Franz Joseph Haydn (72) has not officially resigned as kapellmeister, Prince Nicholas Esterházy rearranges the duties of his musical employees to allow for Haydn’s absence. Most of his responsibilities are taken up by Vice-Kapellmeister Johann Nepomuk Fuchs and Konzertmeister Johann Nepomuk Hummel (25). He further commands that “the entire chapel, with male and female singers, will, according to the order that already exists, hold a weekly rehearsal every Thursday morning and are to appear, every individual without exception, in uniform in service at the Castle at 10:30 before my presence or that of my wife and children.” (Heartz2009, 665)
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December 8, 1804: Publication of the Variations for piano op.15 of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (26) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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January 23, 1805: Publication of the Piano Sonata op.13 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (26) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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February 23, 1805: Publication of the Twelve Dances for piano op.16 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (26) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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July 6, 1805: Publication of the Fantasy for Piano op.18 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (26) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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July 24, 1805: Publication of the Concerto for piano, violin and orchestra op.17 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (26) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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April 15, 1806: Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s (27) cantata Diana ed Endimione to words of Brizzi is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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June 29, 1806: Das Fest des Dankes und Freude, a cantata by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (27), is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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October 29, 1806: Publication of the Rondo for piano op.19 and the Hungarian Dance for piano op.23 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (27) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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December 3, 1806: Publication of the Variations for piano op.21 of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (28) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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January 28, 1807: Publication of the Piano Sonata op.20, the Piano Trio op.22, Twelve Dances for piano op.24 and the Twelve Dances for piano op.25 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (28) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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February 3, 1808: Publication of the Twelve Dances for piano op.27 and the Twelve Dances for piano op.28 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (29) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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December 17, 1808: Publication of the Piano Sonata op.38 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (30) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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December 25, 1808: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (30) is dismissed from the service of Prince Nikolas Esterházy. The reason is that he did not give enough attention to his duties, in favor of composing for the theatre in Vienna. Hummel asks to be reinstated, and he is.
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January 27, 1810: Publication of the Variations for piano op.34 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (31) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 26, 1810: Mathilde von Guise, an opera by Johan Nepomuk Hummel (31) after Mercier-Dupaty is performed for the first time, in the Kärntnertortheater, Vienna.
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April 1, 1810: Emperor Napoléon, in person, marries Archduchess Marie Louise, daughter of the Emperor Franz I of Austria, in a civil ceremony at Saint Çloud. A cantata for the occasion by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (31) is performed.
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August 22, 1810: Publication of the Violin Sonata op.37a by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (31) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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February 2, 1811: Publication of the Twelve Dances for piano op.40 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (32) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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February 9, 1811: Publication of the Concerto for piano and orchestra op.34a and the Twelve Dances op.39 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (32) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 18, 1811: Having been sacked once before and reinstated, Johann Nepomuk Hummel is finally dismissed by Prince Nikolas Esterházy. See 25 December 1808.
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July 10, 1811: Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s (32) pantomime Der Zauberring, oder Harlekin als Spinne to words of Angiolini, is performed for the first time, in the Theater an der Wien, Vienna.
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October 30, 1811: Publication of a Piano Trio op.35 and the Piano Variations op.40a by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (32) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 25, 1812: Publication of the Twelve Dances for piano op.44 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (33) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 5, 1812: Dies Haus is zu verkaufen, a singspiel by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (33) to words of Klebe after Duval, is performed for the first time, at the Leopoldstädttheater, Vienna.
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May 23, 1812: Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s (33) pantomime Der Zauberkampf, oder Harlekin in seiner Heimat to words of Kees is performed for the first time, in Theater an der Wien, Vienna.
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September 11, 1812: Sappho von Mitilene, a ballet by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (33) to a scenario by Viganò, is performed for the first time, at Theater an der Wien, Vienna.
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October 24, 1812: Publication of Eight Piano Pieces op.37 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (33) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 16, 1813: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (34) marries Elisabeth Röckel, a vocalist, in Vienna.
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December 8, 1813: A benefit for wounded Austrian and Bavarian soldiers at the University of Vienna features the first performance of two works by Ludwig van Beethoven (42): the Symphony no.7 and Wellington’s Victory. The works cause ecstatic applause and critical raves. The concert is so successful it will be repeated 12 December. Wellingtons’s Victory is directed by Beethoven with the assistance of Ignaz Moscheles, and Antonio Salieri (63). The violins include Louis Spohr (29), Ignaz Schuppanzigh, and Joseph Mayseder. Playing bass drum are Meyer Beer (Giacomo Meyerbeer) (22) and Johann Nepomuk Hummel (35). Besides the Beethoven works, the concerts also include two marches, one by Jan Ladislav Dussek (†0), one by Ignace Joseph Pleyel (56), performed by Mälzel’s Mechanical Trumpeter with orchestral accompaniment.
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March 10, 1814: Die Eselshaut, oder Die blaue Insel, a feenspiel by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (35) to words of Geway, is performed for the first time, in the Theater an der Wien, Vienna.
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April 11, 1814: “Germania,” the finale of a pasticcio called Die gute Nachricht, by Ludwig van Beethoven (43), is performed for the first time. The overture, a quartet “Ein Jüngling in den Besten Jahren”, duet “Kehre wieder, holde Taube”, and trio “Kommt, Freunde, blicket all hinauf” are by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (35). The work celebrates the occupation of Paris.
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June 15, 1814: Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s (35) singspiel Die Rückfahrt des Kaisers to words of Veith is performed for the first time, in the Theater an der Wien, Vienna.
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March 10, 1815: Publication of Six Polonaises op.70 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (36) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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June 15, 1815: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (36) gives the first of two very well received performances at the Deutsches Theater, Pest.
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June 26, 1815: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (36) gives the second of two very well received performances at the Deutsches Theater, Pest.
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January 28, 1816: The Septet op.74 for piano, flute, oboe, horn, viola, cello, and bass by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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April 9, 1816: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) gives a solo performance in Prague. It is his first time in the city in 20 years.
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May 7, 1816: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) gives an all-Hummel performance in Leipzig.
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May 12, 1816: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) gives a second performance in Leipzig. Both this and the one of five days ago are extraordinarily successful.
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August 17, 1816: Publication of the Septet op.74 for piano, flute, oboe, horn, viola, cello, and bass by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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October 2, 1816: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) accepts a position with King Friedrich I of Württemberg in Stuttgart.
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October 11, 1816: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (37) reaches Stuttgart to take up his new position with King Friedrich I of Württemberg.
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January 3, 1817: Publication of the Adagio, Variations, and Rondo on “The Pretty Polly” op.75 for piano by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (38) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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January 31, 1817: A prelude and chorus for Grillparzer’s play Die Ahnfrau by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (38), is performed for the first time, in Theater an der Wien, Vienna.
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February 10, 1817: King Wilhelm I of Württemberg signs a contract with Johann Nepomuk Hummel (38), four months after Hummel began working for him.
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June 11, 1817: Publication of the Variations for Piano op.76 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (38) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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February 11, 1818: Publication of the Mass op.77 for chorus and orchestra by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (39) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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April 19, 1818: Publication of the Adagio, Variations, and Rondo on “Schöne Minka” op.78 for piano by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (39) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 22, 1818: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (39) and cellist Nikolaus Kraft perform in Stuttgart.
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September 30, 1818: Tired of having to fight for the money he feels is due him, and the attacks on his honor, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (39) writes to King Wilhelm I of Württemberg asking to be released from his contract. The King will refuse.
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November 12, 1818: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (39) informs the Stuttgart management that he considers himself absolved from his contract. The court responds that he is dismissed.
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January 5, 1819: A contract with Johann Nepomuk Hummel (40) appointing him as Kapellmeister to the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, is submitted to Grand Duke Carl August for his approval.
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January 14, 1819: Grand Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach approves a contract with Johann Nepomuk Hummel (40) appointing him as Kapellmeister.
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February 23, 1819: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (40) signs a contract with Grand Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach making him Kapellmeister.
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February 16, 1821: Publication of the Piano Concerto op.85 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (42) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 3, 1821: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (42) gives a concert in Berlin. While in the city, he makes the acquaintance of royal Kapellmeister Gaspare Spontini (36).
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November 4, 1821: In Weimar, Felix Mendelssohn (12) meets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe for the first time. In spite of the vast difference in their ages, the two begin a strong friendship over the next two weeks. Felix has brought several songs by his sister Fanny (15) on Goethe texts. The poet is delighted and will compose a poem for Fanny in gratitude. Also present is the Weimar Kapellmeister Johann Nepomuk Hummel (42).
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April 22, 1822: After three successful concerts in St. Petersburg, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (43) performs once again in Riga. It is so successful that he has to do another one on 26 April.
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April 29, 1822: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (43) gives a concert in Königsberg and tomorrow will improvise on the organ of the Burgkirche. Thus ends his only tour of Russia.
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May 8, 1822: Publication of the Quintet for Piano and Strings op.87 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (43) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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July 15, 1822: Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka (18) graduates from St. Petersburg University Boarding School. At the ceremony he plays the Piano Concerto in a minor by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (43).
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December 1, 1822: Franz Liszt (11), now a piano student of Carl Czerny (31) and a composition student of Antonio Salieri (72), gives his first public concert in the Landständischer Saal, Vienna. Liszt plays the a minor piano concerto of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (44). It is very well received. The Allgemeine Zeitung will call him “a little Hercules...fallen from the clouds.”
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February 2, 1823: A cantata for the birthday of the Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (44) is performed for the first time.
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April 13, 1823: Franz Liszt (11) gives a large concert in the Redoutensaal, Vienna, playing music of Hummel (44), Moscheles, and improvisations on themes suggested by the audience.
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August 5, 1823: Maria Szymanowska (33) meets Johann Wolfgang von Goethe for the first time, in Marienbad.
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November 17, 1824: Publication of the Two Piano Pieces op.109a by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 22, 1825: Abraham and Felix Mendelssohn (16) arrive in Paris to accompany Abraham’s sister Henriette back to Berlin. While in Paris, Felix will come in contact with and perform for many of the composers and virtuosos of the city including Hummel (46), Auber (43), Kalkbrenner (39), Rossini (33), Halévy (25), Liszt (13), and Kreutzer.
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April 8, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) gives the first of his Friday concerts on his current stay in Paris.
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April 15, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) gives the second of his concerts on his current stay in Paris.
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April 22, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) gives the third of his concerts on his current stay in Paris.
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April 29, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) gives the fourth of his Friday concerts on his current stay in Paris. They are a great success.
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May 23, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) gives his farewell concert to Paris, at the Salle du Menus-Plaisirs.
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June 10, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) is given honorary membership in the Société de Musique, Geneva.
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August 30, 1825: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) is given honorary membership in the Société Academique des Enfants d’Apollon in Paris.
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November 7, 1825: Feierlichster Tag, for chorus by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (46) to words of Riemer, is performed for the first time, in Weimar as part of celebrations for the 50th anniversary of Goethe’s service to the Weimar court.
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April 5, 1826: Publication of the Rondo brillant op.109 for piano by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (47) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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November 3, 1826: In a letter dated today, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (47) is informed that he has been created a chevalier of the Legion of Honor by King Charles X. See 16 March 1827.
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February 2, 1827: A cantata for the birthday of Grand Duke Carl August of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) is performed for the first time.
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March 8, 1827: A day after arriving in Vienna on a concert tour, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) visits the home of his close friend, Ludwig van Beethoven (56), now on his deathbed.
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March 13, 1827: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) visits Ludwig van Beethoven (56) on his deathbed, one of four visits by Hummel this month. They share a glass of wine.
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March 16, 1827: A diploma dated today creates Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) a chevalier of the Legion of Honor. See 3 November 1826.
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March 20, 1827: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) and his wife Elisabeth visit Ludwig van Beethoven (48) on his deathbed. Beethoven can only speak in whispers.
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March 23, 1827: With great difficulty, Ludwig van Beethoven (56) signs a will. He leaves his entire estate to his nephew Karl. During the final visit of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48), Beethoven tells him that he expects death soon.
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March 29, 1827: A large crowd gathers around the Schwarzspanierhaus in Vienna where the body of Beethoven lies. Among the spectators are many children, as school has been cancelled for the day. The authorities feel it necessary to call in soldiers to control the large number of people. Inside, nine priests bless the body and a chorale is sung. At 15:00 the procession to the church begins. A military band plays an arrangement of Beethoven’s funeral march from the Piano Sonata op.26. 15-20,000 people watch the procession take one and a half hours to go a little more than a block to Trinity Church of the Minorities. Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48), Carl Czerny (36), and Franz Schubert (30) are among the mourners. A carriage takes the coffin to Währing Cemetery where a funeral oration by Franz Grillparzer is read by Heinrich Anschütz, and the earthly remains of Ludwig van Beethoven are laid to rest.
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April 7, 1827: A concert in honor of Ludwig van Beethoven (†0) takes place in Vienna. Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) improvises variations on the second movement of Beethoven’s Symphony no.7.
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April 23, 1827: Publication of the Gradual Quod quod in orbe op.88 and the Offertorium op.89a, both for chorus and orchestra, by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 2, 1827: The Allgemeine muskalische Zeitung publishes a report that Johann Nepomuk Hummel (48) will be succeeding Carl Maria von Weber (†0) as Kapellmeister in Dresden. It will be widely reported elsewhere. The report is erroneous.
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February 16, 1829: A cantata for the engagement of Princess Augusta of Saxe-Weimar by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (50) is performed for the first time.
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October 30, 1829: Goethe hears Nicolò Paganini (47) play in Weimar with an orchestra conducted by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (50). “In relation to this pillar of flame and cloud I had no base for what is known as enjoyment...All I heard was something akin to a meteor, and then was unable to account for it. All the same it is strange to hear people--especially women--talking about it. With no hesitation they say out loud what are effectively confessions.”
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January 16, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) is voted honorary membership in the Philharmonic Society of London.
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February 20, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) departs Weimar for a tour of France and England.
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March 5, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) arrives in Paris on his current tour. It is his second trip to the French capital.
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March 24, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) gives a very successful concert in the Salle Chantereine, Paris.
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April 3, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) gives his second and last concert on this trip through Paris.
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April 8, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) departs Paris for London.
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April 17, 1830: While he is in London, Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) is created a corresponding member of the Institut de France in the Académie des Beaux Arts.
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April 29, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) gives his first concert on his current stay in London, in the concert hall of the King’s Theatre, Haymarket.
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May 11, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) gives his second concert on his current stay in London, in the concert hall of the King’s Theatre, Haymarket.
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June 21, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) gives the farewell concert on his current trip to London. In spite of the audience’s concern for the health of the King, the performance is a success.
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July 10, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) departs London after a highly successful three months of concertizing.
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September 30, 1830: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (51) is made an honorary member of the Maatschappij tot Bevorderung der Toonkunst of Rotterdam.
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November 20, 1830: Publication of the Concerto for Piano and Orchestra op.113 by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) is announced in the Allgemeiner musikalischer Anzeiger, Vienna.
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March 22, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) departs Weimar for a second tour to England.
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April 24, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) arrives in London for concertizing.
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April 26, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) performs before the royal family at St. James’ Court.
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May 11, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) gives his first public concert on this tour to London, in the concert room of the King’s Theatre, Haymarket. Attendance is lower than usual owing to the ongoing election campaign.
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June 29, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) and Nicolò Paganini (48) give a joint concert before King William, the Queen and nobility at St. James’ Palace. Paganini’s presence in London has been overshadowing Hummel’s efforts on his current visit to the city. The two have met before, having shared a stage in Weimar in 1829.
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July 5, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) gives his first English concert outside of London, in Manchester. A second performance follows on 7 July.
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July 17, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) departs London for Germany with a gift from Queen Adelaide.
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August 20, 1831: Feeling neglected by his teacher Friedrich Wieck, Robert Schumann (21) writes to Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) asking to be his pupil. Nothing will come of it.
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November 6, 1831: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (52) is made an honorary member of the Maatschappy van Verdiensten of Amsterdam.
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March 26, 1832: The mortal remains of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe are laid to rest in Weimar. Music for the event is composed and directed by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53).
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April 25, 1832: Having not heard from his letter of last 20 August, Robert Schumann (21) writes a second letter to Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53), enclosing his Papillons op.2.
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May 24, 1832: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53) in Weimar writes to Robert Schumann (21) in Leipzig. Schumann wrote twice to Hummel asking for a critique of his opp.1 and 2. Hummel finds Schumann talented but says he is “trying too hard to achieve originality, by which I mean something strange.” (Kroll 286) He encourages Schumann but says nothing about taking him as a pupil.
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August 25, 1832: César Franck (9) is given a large collection of the music of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (53) as a prize for winning the first prize in solfege at the Royal Conservatory of Liège.
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December 28, 1832: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) is awarded the Order of the White Falcon by his employer, Grand Duke Carl Friedrich of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.
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January 5, 1833: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) petitions his employers in Weimar that he be absolved of the requirement to wear a servant’s uniform. They will agree, but it will be applicable only when he gives performances outside Weimar.
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March 1, 1833: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) arrives in London for another few months in the city.
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March 9, 1833: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) meets Queen Adelaide at Windsor Castle. He plays the organ for her and plays for her and King William in the evening.
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March 14, 1833: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) begins a new tour of London as a conductor, directing Der Freischütz at the King’s Theatre.
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May 17, 1833: In response to queries about the remaining concerts this season, the directors of the Philharmonic Society, London write to Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) that “they cannot avail themselves of your assistance.”
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May 21, 1833: The directors of the Philharmonic Society, London change their decision of four days ago and invite Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) to perform at an upcoming concert.
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June 16, 1833: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) arrives at Ostende, having departed England for the last time.
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June 23, 1833: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) ends his last tour to northern climes on his return to Weimar.
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September 4, 1833: Publication of the Fantasia op.123 for piano and the Fantasia on Themes from Mozart’s “The Marriage of Figaro” op.124 for piano by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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September 19, 1833: Publication of 24 Etudes op.125 for piano by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (54) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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May 16, 1834: Publication of Oberons Zauberhorn op.116, a fantasy for piano and orchestra by Johann Nepomuk Hummel (55) is announced in the Wiener Zeitung.
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March 18, 1835: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (56) is made an honorary member of the Maatschappy tot Bevordering der Toonkunst, Amsterdam.
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March 19, 1837: Johann Nepomuk Hummel (58) conducts his last orchestral concert at Weimar.
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October 17, 1837: 07:00 Johann Nepomuk Hummel dies at his home in the Marienstraße, Weimar, Grand Duchy of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, probably of heart disease, aged 58 years, eleven months and three days.
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October 20, 1837: A funeral is held in memory of Johann Nepomuk Hummel in Weimar in the presence of the Grand Ducal court. His mortal remains are laid to rest in the Historic Cemetery, near those of the ruling family, Goethe, and Schiller.
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March 24, 1839: César Franck (16) appears as piano soloist with the Conservatoire Concerts Society, Paris, playing music of Johann Nepomuk Hummel (60).
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July 23, 1839: Anton Rubinstein (9) makes his debut in Moscow. He plays a movement from the a minor concerto of Hummel (†1) and pieces by Field (†2), Henselt (25), Thalberg (27), and Liszt (27).
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May 6, 1846: Camille Saint-Saëns (10) gives his first evening public performance as pianist at the Salle Pleyel, Paris. He plays two concertos, the Mozart (†54) K.450 and Beethoven’s (†19) third, a Hummel (†8) sonata, a prelude and fugue by Bach (†95) and others, all from memory.