A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Paul Hindemith

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November 16, 1895: Paul Hindemith is born in Hanau, near Frankfurt-am-Main, German Empire, eldest of three children born to Robert Rudolf Emil Hindemith, a house painter, and Marie Sophie Warnecke, daughter of sheepherders.
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July 5, 1913: A Set of Variations for piano by Paul Hindemith (17) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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June 12, 1914: Andante and Scherzo op.1 for clarinet, horn, and piano by Paul Hindemith (18) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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April 26, 1915: String Quartet in C op.2 by Paul Hindemith (19) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main. The composer plays the first violin part.
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July 24, 1915: Paul Hindemith (19) signs a contract as violinist in the Frankfurt Opera.
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September 25, 1915: World War I: 07:00 British forces send 150 tons of chlorine towards the Germans, then go over the top at Loos. They manage to push the Germans back to their secondary defense line.  Robert Rudolph Hindemith, father of Paul Hindemith (19), dies in Belgium. 09:15 French forces attack along a 30 km front in Champagne.  Fritz Jürgens, 27-year-old German composer, is killed in action in Champagne.

Noon. French forces attack along a 30 km front in Artois. The combined assault makes small gains, capturing Souchez, but then is pushed back with vigor.

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June 28, 1916: Concerto for cello and orchestra op.3 by Paul Hindemith (20) is performed for the first time, at the Hoch Conservatory, Frankfurt the composer making his conducting debut.
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December 18, 1916: Eight Waltzes op.6 for piano duet by Paul Hindemith (21) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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March 12, 1917: Three Movements for cello and piano op.8 by Paul Hindemith (21) is performed for the first time, in the Kleiner Saalbau, Frankfurt-am-Main.
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August 13, 1917: World War I: Paul Hindemith (21) receives his army record card after his induction into the German army. He is stationed at Frankfurt-am-Main. Later sent to France, he will never see action, always having musical duties. “I play the big drum,” he reports home.
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September 25, 1917: Paul Hindemith’s (21) first published work is brought out by Breitkopf and Härtel, Leipzig: Three Pieces for cello and piano.
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March 6, 1918: Piano Quintet in e minor op.7 by Paul Hindemith (22) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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June 2, 1919: The first public concert devoted to the music of Paul Hindemith (23) takes place at the newly founded Verein für Theater-und Musikkultur in Frankfurt-am-Main. Works premiered include the Violin Sonata op.11/1, the Viola Sonata op.11/4, and the String Quartet no.2 op.10. The composer appears as violist in the quartet, as pianist in the two sonatas.
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October 27, 1919: Sonata no.1 for cello and piano op.11/3 by Paul Hindemith (23) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main along with the premiere of Melancholie op.13, a cycle of songs for voice and string quartet to words of Morgenstern.
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February 26, 1920: Three Hymns of Walt Whitman op.14 for voice and piano by Paul Hindemith (24) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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February 28, 1920: In einer Nacht.../Träume und Erlibnisse op.15, a suite for piano by Paul Hindemith (24), is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart.
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April 10, 1920: The Violin Sonata op.11/2 by Paul Hindemith (24) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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November 14, 1920: Paul Hindemith’s (24) Sonata for unaccompanied viola op.11/5 is performed for the first time, in Friedburg, by the composer.
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December 16, 1920: Piano Sonata op.17 by Paul Hindemith (25) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 4, 1921: Two stage works by Paul Hindemith (25) are performed for the first time, in the Landestheater, Stuttgart: Mörder, Hoffnung der Frauen op.12, an opera to words of Kokoschka, and Das Nusch-Nuschi op.20, a play for Burmese marionettes to words of Blei.
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August 1, 1921: String Quartet no.3 op.16 by Paul Hindemith (25) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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January 24, 1922: Des Todes Tod for voice and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (26) to words of Reinacher is performed for the first time, privately, in Berlin. See 7 March 1922.
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January 25, 1922: Acht Lieder nach verschiedenen Dichten op.18 by Paul Hindemith (26) are performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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March 7, 1922: Des Todes Tod for voice and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (26) to words of Reinacher is performed publicly for the first time, in Berlin. See 24 January 1922.
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March 18, 1922: Paul Hindemith’s (26) Sonata for unaccompanied viola op.25/1 is performed for the first time, by the composer in Cologne.
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March 26, 1922: Sancta Susanna op.21, an opera by Paul Hindemith (26) to words of Stramm, is performed for the first time, at the Opernhaus, Frankfurt-am-Main.
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July 12, 1922: Kleine Kammermusik op.24/2 by Paul Hindemith (26) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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July 31, 1922: Kammermusik no.1 and Die junge Magd, a song cycle for alto, flute, clarinet, and string quartet op.23/2 to words of Trakl, both by Paul Hindemith (26), are performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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November 4, 1922: String Quartet no.4 op.22 by Paul Hindemith (26) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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December 13, 1922: The Christmas fairy tale Tuttifäntchen by Paul Hindemith (27), to words of Michel and Becker, is performed for the first time, in Darmstadt.
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January 10, 1923: Sonata for viola and piano op.25/4 by Paul Hindemith (27) is performed for the first time, in Elberfeld-Barmen. The soloist is the composer.
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February 3, 1923: At a performance of Paul Hindemith’s (27) String Quartet op.22 in Prague, the composer meets Leos Janácek (68) for the first time. Janácek gives him a copy of his Violin Sonata and within a few days, Hindemith will give the German premiere of the piece, in Frankfurt.
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May 6, 1923: Sonata for cello alone op.25/3 by Paul Hindemith (27) is performed for the first time, in Freiburg.
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June 22, 1923: 13 of the 15 songs of Das Marienleben, a song cycle by Paul Hindemith (27) to words of Rilke, are performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen. See 15 October 1923.
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July 26, 1923: “Minimax” Repertorium für Militärorchester for string quartet by Paul Hindemith (27) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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August 7, 1923: The Clarinet Quintet op.30 of Paul Hindemith (27) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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August 15, 1923: The first Bauhaus festival opens in Weimar. Concerts over the next six weeks will include music by Igor Stravinsky (41), Feruccio Busoni (67), Ernst Krenek (22), and Paul Hindemith (27).
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October 15, 1923: Das Marienleben, a song cycle by Paul Hindemith (27) to words of Rilke, is performed completely for the first time, in Frankfurt. See 22 June 1923.
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November 5, 1923: String Quartet no.5 op.32 by Paul Hindemith (27) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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December 1, 1923: Der Dämon op.28, a dance pantomime by Paul Hindemith (28) to words of Krell, is performed for the first time, at the Darmstadt Landestheater.
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May 15, 1924: At the registry office in Frankfurt-am-Main, Paul Hindemith (28) marries Gertrud Rottenberg, daughter of Ludwig Rottenberg, music director of the Frankfurt Opera, in whose orchestra Hindemith plays.
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May 21, 1924: The Sonata for unaccompanied violin op.31/1 by Paul Hindemith (28) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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August 6, 1924: String Trio no.1 by Paul Hindemith (28) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg, the composer playing the viola.
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September 22, 1924: Tanzstücke op.19 for piano by Paul Hindemith (28) are performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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October 30, 1924: The cantata Die Seranaden op.35 by Paul Hindemith (28) to the words of several Romantic poets, is performed for the first time over the airwaves of Radio Frankfurt.
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October 31, 1924: Kammermusik no.2 op.36/1 for piano and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (28) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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November 2, 1924: Five of the six Lieder nach alten Texten op.33/1-4, 6 for chorus by Paul Hindemith (29) are performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen. See 26 July 1925.
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April 30, 1925: Kammermusik no.3 op.36/2, a cello concerto by Paul Hindemith (29), is performed for the first time, in Bochum, the composer conducting.
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July 18, 1925: The Concerto for Orchestra op.38 by Paul Hindemith (29) is performed for the first time, in Duisberg.
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July 25, 1925: The Concerto for oboe, bassoon, violin, and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (29) is performed for the first time, in Duisburg
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July 26, 1925: The fifth of the Lieder nach alten Texten op.33 for chorus by Paul Hindemith (29) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen. See 2 November 1924.
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September 25, 1925: Kammermusik no.4 op.36/3 for violin and chamber orchestra by Paul Hindemith (29) is performed for the first time, in Dessau.
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October 5, 1925: Klaviermusik op.27 by Paul Hindemith (29) is performed for the first time, in Dresden.
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February 18, 1926: Drei Anekdoten für Radio for clarinet, trumpet, violin, double bass, and piano by Paul Hindemith (30) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Frankfurt Radio.
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July 24, 1926: Konzertmusik op.41 for wind orchestra by Paul Hindemith (30) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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July 25, 1926: Musik für mechansiche Instrumente op.40 by Paul Hindemith (30) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen along with the premiere of Rondo aus der Klaviermusik op.37 for mechanical piano.
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August 13, 1926: 1922. Suite for piano op.26 by Paul Hindemith (30) is performed for the first time, in Hannover.
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November 9, 1926: Cardillac op.39, an opera by Paul Hindemith (30) to words of Lion, after Hoffmann, is performed for the first time, at the Dresden Staatsoper. See 20 June 1952.
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February 10, 1927: Leos Janácek (72), Arnold Schoenberg (52), and Paul Hindemith (31) are inducted into the Prussian Academy of Arts.
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July 17, 1927: Paul Hindemith's (31) dramatic sketch Hin und zurück, to words of Schiffer, is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden. It is received well by press and public. Also on the program is the premiere of Mahagonny, a “songspiel” by Kurt Weill (27) to words of Bertolt Brecht, accompanied by loud insults and flying missiles, mostly rotten produce. This marks the first appearance of Lotte Lenja (Frau Weill) in a work of Weill. Among the audience is Aaron Copland (26).
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November 3, 1927: Kammermusik no.5 op.36/4, a viola concerto by Paul Hindemith (31), is performed for the first time, in Berlin, the composer as soloist.
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December 7, 1927: Zwei Lieder für drei Singstimmen by Paul Hindemith (32) to words of Hölderlin and Keller are performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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January 8, 1928: Kammermusik no.7 op.46/2, a concerto for organ and chamber orchestra by Paul Hindemith (32), is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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March 15, 1928: A Trio for piano, viola, and heckelphone or tenor saxophone op.47 by Paul Hindemith (32), is performed for the first time, in Wiesbaden, the composer as violist.
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March 29, 1928: Kammermusik no.6 op.46/1 for viola d’amore and chamber orchestra by Paul Hindemith (32) is performed for the first time, in Cologne, the composer as soloist.
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July 14, 1928: Vormittagsspuk for mechanical piano by Paul Hindemith (32) is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden.
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March 27, 1929: Frau Musica op.45/1, a cantata for chorus and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (33) to words of Luther, is performed for the first time, in Nuremberg. Also performed is Hindemith’s Ein Jäger aus Kurpfalz op.45/3 for strings and winds.
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June 8, 1929: Neues vom Tage, a comic opera by Paul Hindemith (33) to words of Schiffer, is performed for the first time, in the Kroll Opera House, Berlin. See 7 April 1954.
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July 27, 1929: Der Lindberghflug, a radio play by Bertolt Brecht with music by Paul Hindemith (33) and Kurt Weill (29), is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden. See 5 December 1929.
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July 28, 1929: William Walton (27) meets with Paul Hindemith (33) in Baden-Baden to discuss his Viola Concerto. Hindemith agrees to perform the solo.
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July 28, 1929: Paul Hindemith’s (33) music theatre work Lehrstück, to words of Brecht, is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden. The story leaves the audience aghast.
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October 3, 1929: The Viola Concerto of William Walton (27) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. Paul Hindemith (33) is the soloist with the composer at the podium. Also premiered is the Overture, Elegy, and Rondo for orchestra by Arnold Bax (45).
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December 5, 1929: Concerto for viola and orchestra op.108 by Darius Milhaud (37) is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam. The soloist is Paul Hindemith (33).
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March 28, 1930: Konzertmusik op.48 for viola and chamber orchestra by Paul Hindemith (34) is performed for the first time, in Hamburg, the composer as soloist.
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June 18, 1930: Grammophonplatten-eigene Stücke for xylophone and three phonograph discs by Paul Hindemith (34) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 19, 1930: Paul Hindemith’s (34) radio play Sabinchen is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 20, 1930: The first public performance on the Trautonium takes place at the Berlin Academy of Music. The three instruments are played by Paul Hindemith (34), his student Oskar Sala, and a piano teacher at the academy, Rudolph Schmidt. The electronic instrument was developed by Friedrich Trautwein over the last two years. Hindemith’s Des kleinen Elektromusikers Lieblinge is performed for the first time.
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June 21, 1930: Wir bauen eine Stadt, a children’s opera by Paul Hindemith (34) to words of Seitz, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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October 12, 1930: Konzertmusik op.49 for piano, brass, and two harps by Paul Hindemith (34) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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April 3, 1931: Konzertmusik op.50 for strings and brass by Paul Hindemith (35) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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June 7, 1931: Konzertstück for trautonium and strings by Paul Hindemith (35) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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November 21, 1931: Das Unaufhörliche, an oratorio by Paul Hindemith (36) to words of Benn, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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April 15, 1932: Philharmonisches Konzert by Paul Hindemith (36), composed to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Berlin Philharmonic, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 20, 1932: Mahnung an die Jugend, sich der Musik zu befleißigen, a cantata for narrator, children’s chorus, and strings by Paul Hindemith (36) to words of Agricola, is performed for the first time, in Plön. Other excerpts from Plöner Musiktag premiered today are Orchestral Concert Morgenmusik for brass, Trio for three recorders, and Tafelmusik.
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March 17, 1933: String Trio no.2 by Paul Hindemith (37) is performed for the first time, in Antwerp, the composer performing the viola part.
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January 23, 1934: Duet for viola and cello by Paul Hindemith (38) is performed for the first time, in London.
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March 12, 1934: Mathis der Maler, a symphony based on the unperformed opera of the same name by Paul Hindemith (38), is performed for the first time, in Berlin. The work is enthusiastically received, despite criticism of Hindemith by top Nazis. See 28 May 1938.
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November 16, 1934: The Reichsmusikkammer equates Paul Hindemith (38) with Richard Strauss (70) and Hans Pfitzner (65) as “the only true composers and articles of export.” Hindemith has threatened to emigrate if attacks on him are not stopped.
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November 25, 1934: In the Deutsche Allgemeine Zeitung, Wilhelm Fürtwängler, vice-president of the Reichsmusikkammer, publishes an article strongly defending Paul Hindemith (39) who was the subject of a Nazi boycott. He also condemns politics invading art. In the evening, at the Berlin Staatsoper, Furtwängler is unable to begin the performance he is to conduct until he receives an ovation lasting 20 minutes. See 6 December 1934.
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December 4, 1934: Wilhelm Furtwängler resigns his posts as Deputy President of the Reichsmusikkammer, Director of the Berlin Staatsoper, and conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic, mostly because the government insists on labeling Paul Hindemith (39) a “cultural Bolshevik.”
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December 6, 1934: Speaking in the Berlin Sportpalast, Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels denounces Paul Hindemith (39) (although not by name): “Purely German his blood may be, but this only provides dramatic confirmation of how deeply the Jewish intellectual infection has eaten into the body of our own people.” He also denounces the “moral decay” of atonal composers. Following the speech, a telegram to Goebbels is read congratulating him on “weeding out undesirable elements,” signed by Reichsmusikkammer President Richard Strauss (70). Strauss will deny that he sent the telegram, but there was a telegram sent to Goebbels, drafted by Strauss’ son Franz and approved by Strauss, congratulating Goebbels for going after atonality.
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February 26, 1935: At a meeting of the leadership council of the Reichsmusikkammer, a solution to the “Hindemith problem” is devised. Richard Strauss (70) will ask Joseph Goebbels to reinstate Paul Hindemith (39) to his position at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik and withdraw a ban on his works, as long as the number of performances is kept low so as not to seem like an endorsement.
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April 6, 1935: Paul Hindemith (39) and his wife arrive in Ankara. He will consult with the Turkish government with the aim of reforming their music education system.
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November 14, 1935: Der Schwanendreher, a viola concerto by Paul Hindemith (39), is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam, the composer as soloist.
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January 17, 1936: Paul Hindemith (40) signs an oath of allegiance to Adolf Hitler.
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January 22, 1936: Trauermusik for viola and strings by Paul Hindemith (40) is performed for the first time, in London the composer as soloist. The work was written yesterday in response to the death of King George V.
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February 18, 1936: Sonata for violin and piano no.3 by Paul Hindemith (40) is performed for the first time, in Geneva.
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March 22, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) writes to Fritz Stein, director of the Frankfurt Hochmusikschule, submitting his resignation effective 30 September.
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March 25, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) sails from Hamburg aboard the SS Deutschland for the United States.
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April 2, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) arrives in New York from Hamburg aboard the SS Deutschland.
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April 10, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) makes his first performing appearance in the United States, playing his own Sonata for viola solo at the Library of Congress, Washington. On the same program, Hindemith’s Piano Sonata no.3, Sonata for flute and piano, and the first four of the Sechs Lieder for tenor and piano to words of Hölderlin, are performed for the first time. Also premiered are the first two movements of Concerto for Horns by Carlos Chávez (37). See 4 November 1964.
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April 12, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) appears as viola soloist with the Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by Arthur Fiedler in the Boston Chamber Music Club. He plays the Sonata for viola solo op.25/1 and Der Schwanendreher. Also performed is his Wind Quintet op.24/2.
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April 15, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) performs Der Schwanendreher with the New York Philharmonic in Carnegie Hall, less satisfactorily than in Boston. Nadia Boulanger (49) gives a reception afterward which is attended by Igor Stravinsky (54).
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April 21, 1937: A Sonata for viola solo by Paul Hindemith (41) is performed for the first time, in Chicago. He composed it on the train to Chicago within the last two days.
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April 27, 1937: Paul Hindemith (41) sails from New York for Hamburg on the SS Europa.
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September 30, 1937: Paul Hindemith’s (41) resignation from the Frankfurt Hochschule becomes effective.
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December 5, 1937: Symphonic Dances by Paul Hindemith (42) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC, originating from London the composer conducting.
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January 18, 1938: Paul Hindemith’s (42) Organ Sonatas nos. 1 and 2 are performed for the first time, at the West London Synagogue.
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February 18, 1938: Paul Hindemith (42) arrives in New York from Bremerhaven aboard the SS Deutschland for a second concert tour of the United States.
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March 19, 1938: Paul Hindemith (42) teaches in the United States for the first time when he lectures on “Inspiration” at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts.
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April 2, 1938: After eleven concerts in the United States, Paul Hindemith (42) departs for Germany.
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May 24, 1938: As part of the Reichsmusiktage which began two days ago, an exhibition of degenerate music opens in Düsseldorf. Among the composers enshrined as “cultural bolsheviks” are Arnold Schoenberg (63), Igor Stravinsky (55), Alban Berg (†2), Paul Hindemith (42), Kurt Weill (38), and Ernst Krenek (37).
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May 28, 1938: Mathis der Maler, an opera by Paul Hindemith (42) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the Zürich Stadttheater. It is an immediate success. See 12 March 1934.
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July 20, 1938: Sonata for oboe and piano by Paul Hindemith (42) is performed for the first time, in London.
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July 21, 1938: Nobilissima visione, a dance legend by Paul Hindemith (42) to a scenario by Massine, is performed for the first time, in London, the composer conducting.
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August 16, 1938: Paul Hindemith (42) and his wife abandon their Berlin residence. They will soon reside in Switzerland.
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September 13, 1938: An orchestral suite from Nobilissima visione by Paul Hindemith (42) is performed for the first time, in Venice.
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September 29, 1938: Having abandoned their Berlin residence, Paul Hindemith (42) and his wife move to Bluche, Switzerland.
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November 6, 1938: A Bassoon Sonata by Paul Hindemith (42) is performed for the first time, in Zürich. Also premiered is Hindemith’s Sonata for piano four-hands.
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January 28, 1939: Paul Hindemith (43) sails from Boulogne aboard the Dutch liner SS Volendam for New York.
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February 7, 1939: Paul Hindemith (43) arrives in Hoboken, New Jersey aboard the Dutch liner SS Volendam for his third concert tour of the United States in as many years.
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February 21, 1939: In San Francisco, Paul Hindemith (43) writes to his wife about a stop in Cheyenne, Wyoming. “This is still genuine cowboy country. Even the non-cowboy citizens wear the appropriate hats, not to speak of the heavy watch chains and cowboy boots. Everywhere in the shops you find a marvelous selection of guns, of shirts in the most unpredictable colors and fabrics of all kinds, of riding boots, spurs, and fascinating saddles. It was a most interesting stop. However, I cannot imagine them playing Mozart in these outfits.”
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February 28, 1939: Paul Hindemith (43) visits several film studios in Los Angeles in search of a contract. He stops at the Disney studio and talks with Walt Disney as they are creating Fantasia. “I spoke with the great music god Stokowski and had the feeling that in spite of his friendliness he was very insecure and did not particularly like my being there. When I saw what kind of trash he was making and that he was wearing an ultramarine blue silk shirt and a lemon-yellow cravat with albino-like face I really could not muster up the proper feeling of awe.”
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April 23, 1939: Three new works are performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York: Quartet for clarinet, violin, cello, and piano, and Sonata for viola and piano no.3, both by Paul Hindemith (43) as well as the Soliloquy from Soliloquy and Dance for viola and piano by Roy Harris (41). See 10 March 1940.
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April 26, 1939: After his third concert tour of the United States, Paul Hindemith (43) sails from New York aboard the SS President Roosevelt making for Le Havre.
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August 13, 1939: The first four of the Six Orchestral Songs from Das Marienleben by Paul Hindemith (43) are performed for the first time, in Scheveningen, Switzerland. See 21 September 1959.
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February 15, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) arrives by ship in New York from Genoa. Travelling on a German passport he was stopped and questioned in Gibraltar by the Royal Navy. After a perfunctory interview, the captain in charge tells him “Right-O, Mr. Hindemith. Good by and good luck.” The composer tells his wife, “I hope the fellow is soon promoted to Admiral.”
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February 18, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) arrives in Buffalo to take up residence for his first lengthy teaching position in the US, at the University of Buffalo.
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February 29, 1940: Yale University offers Paul Hindemith (44) six days of lectures. He immediately accepts.
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March 12, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) gives the first of six successive Tuesday afternoon lectures at Cornell University.
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March 14, 1940: Violin Concerto by Paul Hindemith (44) is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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March 30, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) visits the students and faculty at Yale University. The day is so positive for all, the Yale faculty believe he must be brought there permanently.
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April 6, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) makes his second visit to Yale. He is invited to join the faculty beginning in September.
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June 22, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) takes up residence in Lenox, Massachusetts. He is there to teach at the Berkshire Music Center.
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July 8, 1940: The opening ceremonies for the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood in Lennox, Massachusetts take place. The first season includes the residency of Paul Hindemith (44) and Aaron Copland (39). Among the students are Norman Dello Joio (27), Leonard Bernstein (21) and Lukas Foss (17).
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July 31, 1940: Organ Sonata no.3 by Paul Hindemith (44) is performed for the first time, at the Tanglewood Music Festival, Lennox, Massachusetts.
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August 4, 1940: One of Paul Hindemith’s (44) students at Tanglewood, Charles Naginski, drowns in the Housatonic River. Officially an accident, the fact that he could not swim and that he went alone suggests design to some. There is speculation that the rigor of Hindemith’s approach drove him to it.
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August 5, 1940: In Paul Hindemith’s (44) composition class at Tanglewood, an air of underlying tension pervades the class. Harold Shapero will remember, “After about two hours went by, the tension got extreme. And Hindemith suddenly burst out and said, ‘They say I killed him.’ Nobody could reply to that. Hindemith wasn’t unsympathetic. He tried to figure out what he’d done and if it could have been his fault. He did talk about it. And then we let it lie, and that was the end of it.” (Copland/Perlis 2012, 131)
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September 10, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) departs Lenox, Massachusetts. He will move to New Haven, Connecticut after meeting his wife in New York as she arrives from Lisbon.
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September 15, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) takes up residence in New Haven, Connecticut where he will be teaching at Yale University.
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November 20, 1940: Paul Hindemith (44) is awarded the Howland Memorial Prize by President Charles Seymour of Yale University. It is the highest honor given by Yale.
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February 7, 1941: Cello Concerto by Paul Hindemith (45) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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February 8, 1941: The governing body of Yale University approves a permanent position for Paul Hindemith (45).
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July 6, 1941: The Berkshire Music Center opens at Tanglewood for a second season. Paul Hindemith (45) and Aaron Copland (40) are again the resident composers. Students include Norman Dello Joio (28), Ulysses Kay (24), Robert Ward (23), and Lukas Foss (18).
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November 21, 1941: Symphony in E flat by Paul Hindemith (46) is performed for the first time, in Minneapolis.
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November 23, 1941: Sonata for english horn and piano by Paul Hindemith (46) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 20, 1942: Sonata for two pianos by Paul Hindemith (47) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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April 23, 1943: Paul Hindemith (47) directs the first of several concerts of early music he will give over the next ten years at Yale University.
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October 3, 1943: Thema mit vier Variationen (Die vier Temperamente), for piano and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (51), is performed for the first time, in Winterthur. See 20 November 1946.
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October 29, 1943: Paul Hindemith’s (47) ballet overture Amor and Psyche is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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November 7, 1943: String Quartet no.6 by Paul Hindemith (47) is performed for the first time, in Washington.
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January 20, 1944: Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes of Carl Maria von Weber for orchestra by Paul Hindemith (48) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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February 15, 1944: Ludus Tonalis for piano by Paul Hindemith (48) is performed for the first time, at the University of Chicago.
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April 16, 1944: The Expiring Frog: recitative and aria ranatica for voice and piano by Paul Hindemith (48) to words of Dickens and the Encyclopedia Britannica is performed for the first time, in New Haven.
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May 5, 1944: Sonata for violin and piano by Paul Hindemith (48) is performed for the first time, in Lisbon.
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September 3, 1944: Theme and Variations: The Four Temperaments for piano and string orchestra by Paul Hindemith (48) is performed for the first time, in Boston. The soloist is Lukas Foss (22).
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October 30, 1944: Three new ballets are performed for the first time, in the Library of Congress, Washington to celebrate the 80th birthday of Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge: Jeux de printemps (six excerpts for chamber orchestra) op.243 by Darius Milhaud (52), Hérodiade, an orchestral recitation after Mallarmé by Paul Hindemith (48), and Appalachian Spring by Aaron Copland (43) to a scenario by Graham. See 7 May 1945, 4 October 1945, and 11 December 1945.
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January 11, 1946: Paul Hindemith (50) becomes a citizen of the United States.
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March 21, 1946: String Quartet no.7 by Paul Hindemith (50) is performed for the first time, in Washington.
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May 14, 1946: When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloom’d: Requiem for those we Love for mezzo-soprano, baritone, chorus, and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (50) to words of Whitman, is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 20, 1946: Thema mit vier Variationen (Die vier Temperamente), a choreographed version of the orchestral work by Paul Hindemith (51), is performed for the first time, in the Central High School of Needle Trades, New York. See 3 October 1943.
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February 1, 1947: Paul Hindemith’s (51) orchestral work Symphonia serena is performed for the first time, in Dallas.
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February 27, 1947: Paul Hindemith’s (51) Piano Concerto is performed for the first time, in Cleveland.
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April 19, 1947: Paul Hindemith (51) and his wife arrive in Genoa, their first return to Europe since 1940.
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May 2, 1947: Two new works commissioned by Harvard University to accompany a symposium on music criticism are performed for the first time, at the Harvard University Memorial Church: Apparebit repentina Dies for chorus and brass by Paul Hindemith (51) to an anonymous eighth century text, and In the Beginning for mezzo-soprano and chorus by Aaron Copland (46) to words from the Bible.
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July 1, 1947: Paul Hindemith (51) is appointed Battell Professor of the Theory of Music by Yale University.
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November 1, 1948: Paul Hindemith’s (52) Cello Sonata is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC.
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December 30, 1948: Paul Hindemith’s (53) Wind Septet is performed for the first time, in Milan.
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January 3, 1949: Paul Hindemith (53) begins a ten-lecture tour of six German cities over the next month sponsored by the US occupation government.
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May 15, 1949: Concerto for woodwinds, harp, and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (53) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre of Columbia University. It is his 25th wedding anniversary.
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July 6, 1949: William Walton (47) writes to Yale University turning down their offer to succeed Paul Hindemith (53) as Professor of Composition.
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July 20, 1949: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hindemith (53) depart Yale University, driving to Colorado Springs where he will conduct and give lectures at Colorado College.
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November 4, 1949: The first two movements of the Concerto for trumpet, bassoon, and string orchestra by Paul Hindemith (53) is performed for the first time, in New Haven, Connecticut.
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March 1, 1950: Sinfonietta in E by Paul Hindemith (54) is performed for the first time, in Louisville the composer conducting.
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March 16, 1950: Music divinas laudes for three voices and optional brass by Paul Hindemith (54) to words of Griselius is performed for the first time, at Harvard University conducted by the composer.
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April 26, 1950: A Sonata for double bass by Paul Hindemith (54) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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June 8, 1950: Paul Hindemith’s (54) French Horn Concerto is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden the composer conducting.
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December 11, 1950: Paul Hindemith’s (55) Clarinet Concerto is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia. The solo part is played by the commissioner, Benny Goodman.
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March 2, 1951: The City of Hamburg awards the Bach Prize to Paul Hindemith (55).
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April 5, 1951: Symphony in B flat for winds by Paul Hindemith (55) is performed for the first time, in Washington, conducted by the composer.
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May 31, 1951: President Theodor Heuss of the Federal Republic of Germany confers on Paul Hindemith (55) the Order of Merit, the country’s highest civilian honor, in ceremonies in Bonn.
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July 15, 1951: Paul Hindemith (55) completes his book A Composer’s World: Horizons and Limitations. It is an expansion of his six Charles Eliot Norton lectures at Harvard University, given in the Autumn of 1949.
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January 25, 1952: Paul Hindemith’s (56) symphony Die Harmonie der Welt, commissioned to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Kammerorchester of Basel, is performed for the first time, in Basel.
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June 20, 1952: A revised version of Cardillac, an opera by Paul Hindemith (56) to his own words after Lion, is performed for the first time, in the Zürich Stadttheater.
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January 12, 1953: The New York Music Critics Circle names Francis Poulenc’s (54) Stabat mater as the best choral work of 1952 and Paul Hindemith’s (57) Septet as the best work of chamber music.
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July 9, 1953: Cantique de l’espérance for mezzo-soprano, chorus, audience, orchestra, and wind orchestra by Paul Hindemith (57) to words of Claudel, is performed for the first time, in the Palace of Fine Arts, Brussels the composer conducting. It was commissioned by UNESCO. See 4 June 1955.
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April 7, 1954: A revised version of Paul Hindemith’s (58) lustige Oper Neues vom Tage to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Naples, conducted by the composer.
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June 4, 1955: Ite, angeli veloces, a cantata in three parts by Paul Hindemith (59), is performed completely for the first time, in Wuppertal, conducted by the composer. The three parts are I. Chant de triomphe du roi David, to words from the Bible, for alto, tenor, chorus, audience, orchestra, and wind orchestra, II. Custos quid de nocte for tenor, chorus, and orchestra, and III. Cantique de l’espérance, to words of Claudel, for mezzo-soprano, chorus, audience, orchestra, and wind orchestra. See 9 July 1953.
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October 10, 1955: The Sibelius Prize is awarded to Paul Hindemith (59) by the Wihuri Foundation.
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August 11, 1957: Paul Hindemith’s (61) opera Die Harmonie der Welt, to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Prinzregententheater, Munich conducted by the composer.
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September 23, 1958: Octet for winds and strings by Paul Hindemith (62) is performed for the first time, in Berlin, the composer performing one of the viola parts. Also premiered is Hindemith’s Suite französischer Tänze for orchestra.
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October 18, 1958: Twelve Madrigals for chorus by Paul Hindemith (62), to words of Weinheber, are performed for the first time, in Vienna, conducted by the composer.
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January 10, 1959: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hindemith (63) sail from Genoa making for New York.
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January 21, 1959: Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hindemith (63) arrive in New York, almost six years after moving to Switzerland.
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January 30, 1959: Pittsburgh Symphony by Paul Hindemith (63), commissioned to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Pittsburgh, is performed for the first time, in Pittsburgh.
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February 21, 1959: After a brief concert tour in the United States, Paul Hindemith (63) and his wife sail from New York, heading for Europe.
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April 2, 1959: Five motets for voice and piano by Paul Hindemith (63) to words from the Bible are performed for the first time, in Vienna: Cum natus esset, In Principio erat Verbum, Pastores loquebantur, Nuptiae factae sunt, and Defuncto Herode.
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September 21, 1959: The fifth and sixth of the Six Orchestral Songs from Das Marienleben by Paul Hindemith (63) are performed for the first time, in Copenhagen. See 13 August 1939.
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February 8, 1960: Paul Hindemith (64) and his wife arrive in New York aboard the SS United States for more concertizing and a visit to Yale.
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March 12, 1960: Paul Hindemith (64) and his wife depart New York for Le Havre aboard the SS United States.
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July 1, 1960: New works are performed in the Basel Kongresshalle for the 500th anniversary of Basel University, including Cantata academica, carmen basiliense op.62 for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Benjamin Britten (46) and March for orchestra by Paul Hindemith (64).
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July 29, 1960: Two works are performed for the first time, at the Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York: Élégie et rondeau for alto saxophone and piano by Karel Husa (38) and Concerto for two alto saxophones by Paul Hindemith (64) 27 years after it was composed. See 6 May 1962.
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October 2, 1960: Four motets for voice and piano by Paul Hindemith (64) to words from the Bible are performed for the first time, in Berlin: Ascendente Jesu in naviculam, Angelus Domini apparuit, Dicebat Jesus scribis et pharisaels, and Cum factus esset Jesus annorum duodecim.
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April 13, 1961: Five motets for voice and piano by Paul Hindemith (65) to words from the Bible are performed for the first time, in Venice: Dixit Jesus Petro, Erat Joseph et Maria, Vidit Joannes Jesum, Exiit edictum and Cum descendisset Jesus.
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July 18, 1961: Paul Hindemith (65) and his wife arrive in New York from Europe.
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September 8, 1961: Paul Hindemith (65) and his wife return to their home in Switzerland from the United States.
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December 17, 1961: Das lange Weihnachtsmahl, an opera by Paul Hindemith (66) to words of Wilder (tr. Hindemith), is performed for the first time, at the Nationaltheater, Mannheim, conducted by the composer. See 13 March 1961.
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June 23, 1962: Mainzer Umzug for soprano, tenor, baritone, chorus, and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (66) to words of Zuckmayer, is performed for the first time, at the Städtisches Theater, Mainz.
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March 6, 1963: Paul Hindemith (67) and his wife arrive in New York from Le Havre aboard the SS America.
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March 13, 1963: The Long Christmas Dinner, an opera by Paul Hindemith (67) to words of Wilder, is performed for the first time in the original English version, at the Juilliard School of Music, New York, conducted by the composer. See 17 December 1961.
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April 25, 1963: Concerto for organ and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (67) is performed for the first time, in New York, the composer conducting.
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May 2, 1963: Paul Hindemith (67) and his wife depart New York for Switzerland. The pair, both US citizens, will never see America again.
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November 12, 1963: Mass for chorus by Paul Hindemith (67) is performed for the first time, in Vienna, the composer conducting in his last public appearance.
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November 15, 1963: Paul Hindemith is taken ill at his home in Blonay, Switzerland and transferred to a hospital in Frankfurt, one day before his 68th birthday.
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December 28, 1963: Paul Hindemith dies of acute pancreatitis in the Marienkrankenhaus, Frankfurt, Federal Republic of Germany, aged 68 years, one month, and twelve days.
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January 4, 1964: The earthly remains of Paul Hindemith are laid to rest in the Cimetière la Chiésaz Saint-Légier, Vaud, Switzerland. (see 28 December)
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November 4, 1964: The fifth and sixth of the Sechs Lieder for tenor and piano by Paul Hindemith (†0) to words of Hölderlin are performed for the first time, in Frankfurt. See 10 April 1937.
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September 6, 1974: Three Orchestral Songs op.9 by Paul Hindemith (†10) to words of Lotz and Lasker-Schüller are performed for the first time, in Frankfurt, 57 years after they were composed.
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September 14, 1980: Lustige Sinfonietta op.4 for orchestra by Paul Hindemith (†16) is performed for the first time, in Berlin, 64 years after it was composed.
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October 9, 1983: Krzysztof Penderecki (49) receives the Sibelius Prize in Helsinki from the Wihuri Foundation. Previous winners include Jean Sibelius (†26), Igor Stravinsky (†12), Paul Hindemith (†19), Dmitri Shostakovich (†8), Olivier Messiaen (74), Witold Lutoslawski (70), and Benjamin Britten (†6).
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March 21, 1987: Ragtime (wohltemperiert) for orchestra by Paul Hindemith (†23) is performed for the first time, in Berlin, 66 years after it was composed.
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July 6, 1989: Wie es wär’, wenn’s anders wär for soprano and eight instruments by Paul Hindemith (†25) to words of von Miris (pseud. of Bonn) is performed for the first time, in Munich, 71 years after it was composed.
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February 6, 1995: Vier Lieder nach Texten des Angelus Silesius for voice and piano by Paul Hindemith (†31) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Rundfunksendung Sudwestfunk II, 60 years after they were composed.
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March 26, 2000: Die Harmonie der Welt, an opera by Paul Hindemith (†36) to his own words, is performed completely for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 22, 2001: Sonata for ten instruments by Paul Hindemith (†37) is performed for the first time, in Heimbach, 84 years after it was composed.
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June 24, 2001: The Sonata for violin alone op.11/6 by Paul Hindemith (†37) is performed completely for the first time, in Heimbach, 83 years after it was composed.
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March 12, 2004: Two Pieces for organ by Paul Hindemith (†40) are performed for the first time, in Vienna, 86 years after they were composed.
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December 9, 2004: Concerto for piano-left hand and orchestra by Paul Hindemith (†40) is performed for the first time, in Berlin, 81 years after it was composed.