A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Hans Werner Henze

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July 1, 1926: Hans Werner Henze is born in Gütersloh, Germany, the first of six children born to Franz Gebhart Henze, a schoolteacher, and Margarete Adele Geldmacher, daughter of a miner.
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June 6, 1944: World War II: The Japanese destroyer Minazuki is sunk by a US submarine off Tawitawi near Sabah. 109 men are lost. British forces win back Kohima, India from the Japanese after 64 days of fierce fighting.

Dawn. 18,000 British and American airborne troops are on the ground in Normandy with the intention of capturing bridges and disrupting communication.  Beginning 06:30 Carried by the largest armada yet assembled, an Allied (United States-Great Britain-Canada-Free France-Poland-Netherlands-Norway-Greece) invasion force lands in Normandy on a line from Carentan to Caen, immediately establishing an effective beachhead. By midnight, 155,000 troops are ashore.

French troops capture Tivoli, 25 km east of Rome.

Members of a panzer division in Magdeburg, who have formed a secret Antimilitarist Club, including Hans Werner Henze (17), drink a toast to the invasion of Europe.

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July 20, 1944: World War II: 12:42 A bomb explodes at Hitler’s headquarters in East Prussia. It was left by Colonel Claus, Count von Stauffenberg as part of a plot to overthrow the government by certain members of the officer corps. Four people are killed, but Hitler is only injured. Von Stauffenberg flies back to Berlin to spring the plot but upon landing he learns that Hitler is alive. The conspirators go ahead with the plan and arrest Gen. Fromm, Commander of the Reserve Army.  18:45 Minister of Propaganda Joseph Goebbels announces over German radio that Hitler is alive and well. Conspirators in Paris order the arrest of all Gestapo and security service officers. When it is learned that Hitler lives, the plan collapses.  Evening. Gen. Friedrich Olbricht and Count von Stauffenberg are executed in the War Ministry, Berlin. Over 5,000 men and women, most not directly connected with the plot, will be executed.  One of the units chosen to move to Berlin to support the uprising is a panzer division in Magdeburg which includes Private Hans Werner Henze (18). After traveling for several hours they stop and return to Magdeburg.
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February 14, 1945: World War II: Indian troops capture Singu, 65 km north of Mandalay. American planes bomb Chemnitz and Magdeburg.

Soviet troops take Schneidemühl (Pila) and Deutsch Krone (Walcz), 80 km north of Poznan as well as Sorau (Zary) and Grünberg (Zielona Góra), southeast of Frankfurt-an-der-Oder.

The city now engulfed in a firestorm, US planes attack Dresden. Returning from Prague to Berlin, a contingent of German soldiers including Private Hans Werner Henze (18) passes through the city.

Chile declares war on Germany.

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April 18, 1945: World War II: War Correspondent Ernie Pyle is killed by enemy fire on Okinawa. 325,000 German troops surrounded in the Ruhr surrender. Their commander, Field Marshall Walther Model, kills himself.

American troops capture Magdeburg and cross the border into Czechoslovakia. As US soldiers reach Magdeburg, German units in the city, including Private Hans Werner Henze (18) are hurriedly evacuated towards Berlin.

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May 1, 1945: Listeners to German radio are told to stand by for an important announcement. This is followed by excerpts from Götterdämmerung and the slow movement of Anton Bruckner's (†48) Seventh Symphony (composed for the death of Wagner (†62)). Finally, Admiral Dönitz, speaking from Hamburg, announces the death of Hitler. He also appeals that the fight against Bolshevism be continued. Hans Werner Henze (18) is one of a small group of soldiers in a village near Esbjerg, Denmark who listens to the broadcast. They light a candle and celebrate surviving the war. In Garmisch, Richard Strauss (81) writes in his diary, “...from 1 May onwards the most terrible period of human history came to an end, the twelve-year reign of bestiality, ignorance, and anti-culture under the greatest criminals, during which Germany’s 2,000 years of cultural evolution met its doom and irreplaceable monuments of architecture and works of art were destroyed by a criminal rabble of soldiers. Accursed be technology!”
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September 27, 1946: Kammerkonzert for piano, flute, and strings by Hans Werner Henze (20) is performed for the first time, in Darmstadt.
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October 5, 1947: Concertino for piano, winds, and percussion by Hans Werner Henze (21) is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden.
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July 29, 1948: Der Vorwurf, a concert aria for baritone, trumpet, trombone, and strings by Hans Werner Henze (22) to words of Werfel, is performed for the first time, in Darmstadt.
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August 25, 1948: Hans Werner Henze (22) begins his first love affair, with the ballet dancer Heinz Poll. “I suddenly knew which my true home was, knew where I belonged, in whose society I would feel at ease and in whose I would not. I had become a human being, become a man. For the first time in my life I was truly happy.” (Copley, 300) Homosexuality is presently a crime in Germany. Henze’s First Symphony is performed completely for the first time, in Bad Pyrmont. See 9 April 1964.
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December 12, 1948: Violin Concerto no.1 by Hans Werner Henze (22) is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden. The work was commissioned by Berlin Radio and was scheduled for performance there, but plans were changed due to the blockade of Berlin.
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February 6, 1949: Chor gefangener Trojer for chorus and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (22) to words of Goethe, is performed for the first time, in Bielefeld.
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May 7, 1949: Hans Werner Henze’s (22) opera for actors Das Wundertheater, after Cervantes, (tr. Graf von Schack), is performed for the first time, in the Heidelberg Stadttheater.
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June 17, 1949: Variations for piano by Hans Werner Henze (22) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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June 26, 1949: Apollo et Hyazinthus for alto and eight players by Hans Werner Henze (22) to words of Trakl, is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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September 28, 1949: Ballett-Variationen for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (23) is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in the Schumann-Saal, Düsseldorf. See 21 December 1958.
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December 1, 1949: Symphony no.2 by Hans Werner Henze (23) is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart.
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March 16, 1950: Kammer-Sonate for piano, violin, and cello by Hans Werner Henze (23) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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April 25, 1950: Five Madrigals for small choir and ensemble by Hans Werner Henze (23) to words of Villon is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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June 14, 1950: Whispers from Heavenly Death, a cantata for high voice and piano by Hans Werner Henze (23) to words of Whitman, is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart.
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June 23, 1950: An orchestral suite from the ballet Jack Pudding by Hans Werner Henze (23) is performed for the first time, in Heidelberg. See 30 December 1950.
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December 30, 1950: Jack Pudding, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (24) to a story by Sivori after Molière, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in the Hessisches Staatstheater, Wiesbaden.
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May 8, 1951: Das Vokaltuch der Kammersängerin Rosa Silber, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (24), is performed for the first time, in a concert setting, in Titania-Palast, Berlin. See 15 October 1958.
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October 7, 1951: Symphony no.3 by Hans Werner Henze (25) is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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November 19, 1951: A recording of Hans Werner Henze’s (25) radio opera after Kafka Ein Landarzt is performed for the first time, in Hamburg. See 29 November 1951 and 30 November 1965.
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November 29, 1951: Hans Werner Henze’s (25) radio opera after Kafka Ein Landarzt is broadcast live for the first time. See 19 November 1951 and 30 November 1965.
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February 17, 1952: Boulevard Solitude, a lyric drama by Hans Werner Henze (25) to words of Jokisch after Weil, is performed for the first time, at the Hanover Opera House. See 7 June 1952.
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May 29, 1952: Labyrinth, a choreographic fantasy by Hans Werner Henze (25), is performed for the first time, in a concert setting, in Darmstadt. See 25 May 1997.
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June 7, 1952: Hans Werner Henze’s (25) Sinfonische Zwischenpiele aus dem lyrischen Drama “Boulevard Solitude” is performed for the first time, in Aachen. See 17 February 1952.
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July 22, 1952: Pas d’action, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (25), is performed for the first time, in the Prinzregententheater, Munich. The composer will withdraw this work and use the music in Tancredi. See 15 January 1953.
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September 1, 1952: Der Idiot, a ballet-pantomime by Hans Werner Henze (26) to a scenario by Bachmann after Dostoyevsky, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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September 14, 1952: Piano Concerto no.1 by Hans Werner Henze (26) is performed for the first time, in Düsseldorf.
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December 16, 1952: String Quartet no.2 by Hans Werner Henze (26) is performed for the first time, in Baden-Baden.
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January 15, 1953: Tancredi, suite for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (26), is performed for the first time, in Hamburg. See 22 July 1952 and 18 May 1966.
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February 15, 1953: Woodwind Quintet by Hans Werner Henze (26) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Radio Bremen.
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May 27, 1953: Hans Werner Henze’s (26) radio opera after Kafka Ein Landarzt is staged for the first time, in Cologne. See 29 November 1951 and 30 November 1965.
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December 4, 1953: Hans Werner Henze’s (27) radio opera Das Ende einer Welt, to words of Hildesheimer, is performed for the first time, in Hamburg. See 30 November 1965.
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April 30, 1954: Ode an den Westwind for cello and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (27) is performed for the first time, in Bielefeld.
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June 5, 1954: Die schlafende Prinzessin, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (27) to a scenario by Zehden, is performed for the first time, at the Essen Stadttheater.
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June 27, 1954: Wiegenlied der Mutter Gottes for chorus and nine players by Hans Werner Henze (27) to words of Lope de Vega, is performed for the first time, in Duisburg.
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May 31, 1955: Quattro poemi for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (28) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt. The conductor, Leopold Stokowski, has a standing rule that latecomers may not be admitted until the intermission. Unfortunately for the composer, he arrives late and is not able to hear his piece.
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February 14, 1956: Drei sinfonische Etuden für Orchester by Hans Werner Henze (29) is performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
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March 9, 1956: Concerto per il Marigny for eight players by Hans Werner Henze (29) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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May 14, 1956: While driving on a country road near Lodi, Hans Werner Henze (29) crashes into a milk cart and breaks his collarbone. With his arm in a cast for six weeks, he is unable to complete the ballet Maratona he is writing for the Ballets Babilée in Paris.
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May 26, 1956: Five Neapolitan Songs for voice and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (29) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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September 23, 1956: Parts of König Hirsch, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (30) to words of von Cramer after Gozzi, are performed for the first time, in the Berlin Städtische Oper. Demonstrations break out, for and against, in the audience. See 4 October 1957, 10 March 1963, and 5 May 1985.
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February 8, 1957: A suite for two jazz bands and orchestra from Hans Werner Henze’s (30) ballet Maratona to a story by Visconti, is performed for the first time, in Cologne. See 24 September 1957.
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September 24, 1957: Maratona, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (31) to a story by Visconti, is performed for the first time, in the Städtische Oper Berlin. See 8 February 1957.
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October 4, 1957: König Hirsch, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (30) to words of von Cramer after Gozzi, is performed completely for the first time, over the airwaves of RAI, Turin. See 23 September 1956 and 5 May 1985.
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October 20, 1957: Nachtstücke und Arien for soprano and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (31) to words of Bachmann, is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen. A few seconds after the performance begins, Pierre Boulez (32), Luigi Nono (33), and Karlheinz Stockhausen (29) stand up and leave the hall.
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March 3, 1958: The second orchestral suite from Hans Werner Henze’s (31) ballet Undine is performed for the first time, in Mannheim. See 27 October 1958 and 10 January 1959.
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March 21, 1958: Sonata per Archi for chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (31) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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October 15, 1958: Das Vokaltuch der Kammersängerin Rosa Silber, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (32), is staged for the first time, in Cologne. See 30 December 1951.
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October 27, 1958: Undine, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (32) to a scenario by Ashton after de la Motte-Fouqué, is performed for the first time, at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. The composer conducts in the presence of Queen Elizabeth. See 3 March 1958 and 10 January 1959.
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November 26, 1958: Kammermusik for tenor and nine players by Hans Werner Henze (32) to words of Hölderlin, is performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
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November 27, 1958: Three new works are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Westdeutscher Rundfunk, Cologne: Concerto for viola and orchestra no.2 op.340 by Darius Milhaud (66), Omnia tempus habent, a cantata for soprano and 17 instruments by Bernd Alois Zimmermann (40) to words of the Vulgate Bible, and Drei Dithyramben for chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (32).
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December 21, 1958: Hans Werner Henze’s (32) ballet blanc Ballet-Variationen is staged for the first time, in Wuppertal. See 3 October 1949.
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January 10, 1959: Trois pas des Tritons, an orchestral excerpt from Hans Werner Henze’s (32) opera Undine, is performed separately for the first time, in Rome. See 3 March 1958 and 27 October 1958.
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September 16, 1959: L’usignolo dell’imperatore, a pantomime by Hans Werner Henze (33) to a scenario by di Majo, after Andersen, is performed for the first time, at Teatro La Fenice, Venice.
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September 26, 1959: Piano Sonata by Hans Werner Henze (33) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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March 28, 1960: Jeux des Tritons, an excerpt from Hans Werner Henze’s (33) ballet Undine for piano and orchestra, is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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May 22, 1960: Der Prinz von Homburg, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (33) to words of Bachmann after Kleist, is performed for the first time, at the Hamburg Staatsoper. See 24 July 1992.
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May 20, 1961: Elegy for Young Lovers, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (34) to words of Auden and Kallman, is performed for the first time, in Schwetzingen. See 28 October 1988.
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January 20, 1962: Antifone for eleven instruments by Hans Werner Henze (35) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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January 28, 1963: Hans Werner Henze (36) delivers a public lecture in the Kongreßhalle, Berlin. He will always consider it one of the most important statements of his beliefs as an artist.
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March 10, 1963: Il Re Corvo, oder Die Irrfahrten der Wahrheit, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (36) to words of von Cramer after Gozzi, is performed for the first time, in the Staatstheater, Kassel. The work is a reduction and rewriting of the composer’s König Hirsch. See 23 September 1956.
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April 24, 1963: Novae de Infinito laudes, a cantata for four solo voices, chorus, and small orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (36) to words of Bruno, is performed for the first time, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice, under the baton of the composer.
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May 16, 1963: Symphony no.5 by Hans Werner Henze (36) is performed for the first time, in New York, directed by Leonard Bernstein (44).
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October 9, 1963: Symphony no.4 by Hans Werner Henze (37) is performed for the first time, in Berlin, directed by the composer.
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November 7, 1963: Six Absences for harpsichord by Hans Werner Henze (37) is performed for the first time, in Mainz.
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April 9, 1964: A revised version of Hans Werner Henze’s (37) Symphony no.1 is performed for the first time, in Berlin. See 25 August 1948.
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April 12, 1964: Being Beauteous for soprano, harp, and four cellos by Hans Werner Henze (37) to words of Rimbaud, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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August 23, 1964: Ariosi for soprano, violin, and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (38) to words of Tasso, is performed for the first time, in Edinburgh.
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September 20, 1964: Incidental music to Aristophanes’ (tr. Hacks) play Der Frieden by Hans Werner Henze (38), is performed for the first time, in the Munich Kammerspiele.
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October 12, 1964: Being Beauteous for soprano, harp, and four cellos by Hans Werner Henze (37) to words of Rimbaud, is performed for the first time, in Berlin, the composer conducting.
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November 30, 1964: Divertimenti for two pianos by Hans Werner Henze (38) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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February 26, 1965: Cantata della Fiaba Estrema for soprano, small choir, and instrumental ensemble by Hans Werner Henze (38) to words of Morante, is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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March 16, 1965: In memoriam: Die Weisse Rose for twelve players by Hans Werner Henze (38) is performed for the first time, in Bologna.
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March 21, 1965: Hans Werner Henze’s (38) Lucy Escott Variations for piano is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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March 26, 1965: In memoriam: Die weiße Rose for small orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (38) is performed for the first time, in Bologna.
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April 6, 1965: During the dress rehearsal for Hans Werner Henze's (38) Der junge Lord in West Berlin, East German planes fly low over the city creating sonic booms. It is an act of intimidation two days before a meeting of the West German Bundestag in West Berlin.
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April 7, 1965: Der junge Lord, a comic opera by Hans Werner Henze (38) to words of Bachmann after Hauff, is performed for the first time, at the Deutsche Oper, Berlin.
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April 26, 1965: Symphony no.4 by Charles Ives (†10) for orchestra and chorus ad.lib. is performed for the first time, in New York almost 50 years after it was completed. Present for the occasion is Hans Werner Henze (38). See 29 January 1927 and 10 May 1933.
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September 4, 1965: Hans Werner Henze (39) delivers a speech at the Stadthalle, Bayreuth in support of Willy Brandt and the SPD. Both Brandt and his wife are present.
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October 12, 1965: Zwischenspiele für Orchester from Hans Werner Henze’s (39) opera Der junge Lord is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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October 13, 1965: Ein Landarzt, a monodrama for baritone and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (39) to words of Kafka, after the composer’s opera, is performed for the first time, in Berlin. See 30 November 1965.
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November 30, 1965: A revised version of Ein Landarzt, a radio opera by Hans Werner Henze (39) after Kafka, is staged for the first time, in the Frankfurt Staatstheater. On the same program is the first staging of a revised version of Henze’s Das Ende einer Welt, to words of Hildesheimer, and a revision of Das Wundertheater, an opera for singers after Cervantes, (tr. Graf von Schack). See 7 May 1949, 19 November 1951, 4 December 1953, and 13 October 1965.
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January 14, 1966: Jewish Chronicle for voices and orchestra by Karl Amadeus Hartmann (†2), Hans Werner Henze (39), Boris Blacher, Paul Dessau, and Rudolf Wagner-Régeney is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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May 18, 1966: Tancredi, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (39) to a scenario by Csobàdi, is staged for the first time, at the Vienna Staatsoper. See 15 January 1953.
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August 6, 1966: The Bassarids, an opera seria by Hans Werner Henze (40) to words of Auden and Kallman after Euripides, is performed for the first time, in Salzburg. Included is the first performance of Henze’s intermezzo The Judgement of Calliope to words of Auden and Kallman.
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September 20, 1966: Musen Siziliens for chorus and 19 players by Hans Werner Henze (40) to words of Vergil, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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December 2, 1966: Doppio Concerto for oboe, harp, and strings by Hans Werner Henze (40) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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January 23, 1967: Lieder von einer Insel for chamber chorus, trombone, two cellos, bass, organ, and percussion by Hans Werner Henze (40) to words of Bachmann, is performed for the first time, in Selb.
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April 1, 1967: Fantasia für Streicher by Hans Werner Henze (40) is performed for the first time, in Berlin as music for the film Der junge Törless.
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April 4, 1967: Telemanniana for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (40) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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April 6, 1967: Los Caprichos for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (40) is performed for the first time, in Duisburg.
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October 10, 1967: Bolivian officials announce that Ernesto “Che” Guevara was killed in a clash between his revolutionary forces and Bolivian federal troops two days ago. In fact, he was captured by Bolivian forces on 8 October and shot to death by a Bolivian soldier the next day. When they hear the news, Hans Werner Henze (41) and Ernst Schnabel, the composer and poet of Das Floß der Medusa, decide to turn the hero of the work into a Guevara-like figure.
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November 2, 1967: Concerto per contrabasso for double bass and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (41) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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February 18, 1968: Thousands of people rally in London, Rome, and West Berlin to protest US policy in Vietnam. The Berlin march includes Hans Werner Henze (41) and Luigi Nono (44).
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May 18, 1968: Moralities, scenic cantatas by Hans Werner Henze (41) to words of Auden after Aesop, is performed for the first time, in Cincinnati. See 1 April 1970.
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September 29, 1968: Piano Concerto no.2 by Hans Werner Henze (42) is performed for the first time, at the opening of a new arts center in Bielefeld. The composer is called to the stage to acknowledge the applause, but the orchestra refuses to stand with him. He will later learn it is because of his leftist political views.
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December 9, 1968: Das Floss der “Medusa”, an oratorio volgare e militare for soprano, baritone, speaker, chorus, boys’ chorus, and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (42) to words of Schnabel, is to be premiered tonight in Hamburg. Before the performance, a poster of Che Guevara is placed on stage, only to be torn down by the organizer of the concert. Left-wing students stick a red flag on the platform in retaliation. When concert officials attempt to remove the banner, the students vigorously defend it. Meanwhile, some members of the West German Radio Chorus refuse to sing under the red flag but the composer will not have it removed. Given these circumstances, the chorus departs. Meanwhile, police have arrived in battle gear, arrest several students and shove the poet, Ernst Schnabel, through a glass door before arresting him as well. Under these conditions the composer refuses to go on and the concert is cancelled. See 29 January 1971.
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February 14, 1969: Versuch über Schweine for baritone and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (42) to words of Salvatore, is performed for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London the composer conducting. The audience is very appreciative.
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March 21, 1969: After being photographed three times by Mexican police, Hans Werner Henze (42) arrives in Havana on a flight from Mexico City.
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November 26, 1969: Symphony no.6 for two chamber orchestras by Hans Werner Henze (43) is performed for the first time, in Havana.
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April 1, 1970: A revised version of Moralities, scenic cantatas by Hans Werner Henze (43) to words of Auden after Aesop, is performed for the first time, in Saarbrücken Kongresshalle. See 18 May 1968.
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June 22, 1970: El Cimmarón for speaker, baritone, flute, guitar, and percussion by Hans Werner Henze (43) to words of Barnet, is performed for the first time, in Aldeburgh, Suffolk.
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January 29, 1971: Das Floss der “Medusa”, an oratorio volgare e militare for soprano, baritone, speaker, chorus, boys’ chorus, and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (44) to words of Schnabel, is performed for the first time, in Vienna. See 9 December 1968.
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February 11, 1971: Compases para preguntas ensimismadas for viola and 22 players by Hans Werner Henze (44) is performed for the first time, in Basel.
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April 23, 1971: Mänadentanz for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (44) from his opera Die Bassariden is performed for the first time, in Bielefeld.
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May 17, 1971: Der langwierige Weg in die Wohnung der Natascha Ungeheuer, a theatre piece by Hans Werner Henze (44) to words of Salvatore, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of RAI originating in Teatro Olimpico, Rome.
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November 2, 1972: Violin Concerto no.2 for violin, tape, bass-baritone, and 33 instruments by Hans Werner Henze (46) to words of Enzensberger is performed for the first time, in Basel.
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November 16, 1972: Heliogabalus Imperator for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (46) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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January 4, 1974: Stimmen for two voices and instrumental ensemble by Hans Werner Henze (47) to words of various authors is performed for the first time, in London the composer conducting.
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March 4, 1974: La cubana, oder Ein Leben für die Kunst, a vaudeville by Hans Werner Henze (47) to words of Enzensberger after Barnet, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of National Educational Television originating in New York. See 28 May 1975.
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October 20, 1974: Tristan for piano, orchestra, and tape by Hans Werner Henze (48) is performed for the first time, in London.
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May 28, 1975: La cubana, oder Ein Leben für die Kunst, a vaudeville by Hans Werner Henze (48) to words of Enzensberger, after Barnet, is staged for the first time, in the Staatstheater am Gärtnerplatz, Munich. See 4 March 1974.
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September 13, 1975: Ragtimes and Habaneras for brass by Hans Werner Henze (49) is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London.
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May 6, 1976: A suite of music from the film Katharina Blum for chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (49) is performed for the first time, in Brighton, Sussex.
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July 12, 1976: We Come to the River, actions for music by Hans Werner Henze (50) to words of Bond, is performed for the first time, at Covent Garden. It is largely ignored by the public and the press.
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August 1, 1976: Don Chisciotte, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (50) after Paisiello to words of Lorenzi and Paisiello, is performed for the first time, in Montepulciano.
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August 6, 1976: Amicizia! for seven players by Hans Werner Henze (50) is performed for the first time, in Montepulciano.
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September 12, 1976: String Quartet no.3 by Hans Werner Henze (50) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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September 20, 1976: Royal Winter Music: “first sonata on Shakespeare characters” for guitar by Hans Werner Henze (50) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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February 2, 1977: Carillon, Récitatif, Masque for mandolin, guitar, and harp by Hans Werner Henze (50) is performed for the first time, in London.
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May 25, 1977: String Quartet no.4 and String Quartet no.5 by Hans Werner Henze (50) are performed for the first time, in Schwetzingen.
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August 10, 1977: Violin Sonata by Hans Werner Henze (51) is performed for the first time, in Montepulciano.
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September 17, 1977: Aria de la folia española for chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (51) is performed for the first time, in St. Paul, Minnesota.
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December 31, 1977: Hans Werner Henze (51) suffers his first heart attack, in London.
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August 2, 1978: Il vitalino raddopiato for violin and chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (52) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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February 28, 1979: L’Autunno for five wind players by Hans Werner Henze (52) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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March 17, 1979: Orpheus, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (52) to a scenario by Bond, is performed for the first time, in the Württembergische Staatsoper, Stuttgart. The composer considers it a “brilliant success.”
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April 20, 1980: Two works by Hans Werner Henze (53) are performed for the first time, in Witten: El Rey de Harlem for voice and small ensemble to words of Lorca, and Sonata for viola and piano.
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April 22, 1980: Barcarola for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (53) is performed for the first time, in Zürich. The audience requires the last movement to be repeated.
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August 2, 1980: Pollicino, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (54) to words of Leva after Collodi, Grimm, and Perrault, is performed for the first time, in Montepulciano.
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September 1, 1980: Apollo trionfante for winds, keyboards, percussion, and double bass by Hans Werner Henze (54) from his dance-drama Orpheus is performed for the first time, in Gelsenkirchen.
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November 16, 1980: Arien des Orpheus for guitar, harp, harpsichord, and strings by Hans Werner Henze (54) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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November 25, 1980: Royal Winter Music: “Second Sonata on Shakespeare Characters” for guitar by Hans Werner Henze (54) is performed for the first time, in Brussels.
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December 2, 1980: Sonatina for violin and piano by Hans Werner Henze (54) is performed for the first time, in London.
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January 6, 1981: Dramatische Szenen aus Orpheus II for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (54) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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August 23, 1981: Cherubino for piano by Hans Werner Henze (55) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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April 14, 1982: I sentimenti di Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach for flute, harp, and strings by Hans Werner Henze (55) is performed for the first time, in Teatro Olimpico, Rome.
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May 26, 1982: Le Miracle de la rose for clarinet and 13 players by Hans Werner Henze (55) is performed for the first time, in London.
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June 6, 1982: Two works called Canzona are performed for the first time, in Stuttgart: Canzona for oboe, three violas, cello, piano, and harpsichord by Hans Werner Henze (55), and Canzona for four violas by Wolfgang Rihm (30).
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September 12, 1982: Dramatische Szenen aus Orpheus I for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (56) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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October 12, 1982: Five Scenes from the Snow Country for marimba by Hans Werner Henze (56) is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart.
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October 13, 1982: Sechs Stücke für junge Pianisten by Hans Werner Henze (56) is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart.
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March 4, 1983: A concert version of Orpheus for speaker and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (56) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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June 2, 1983: The English Cat, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (56) to words of Bond after Balzac, is performed for the first time, in the Württemburgische Staatsoper Stuttgart. See 9 August 1990.
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June 15, 1983: Drei Lieder for tenor and piano by Hans Werner Henze (56) to words of Auden is performed for the first time, in Aldeburgh, Suffolk.
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September 17, 1983: Sonata per otto ottoni for brass by Hans Werner Henze (57) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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September 24, 1983: Capriccio for cello by Hans Werner Henze (57) is performed for the first time, in Linz.
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October 30, 1983: Oedipus der Tyrann, oder Der Vater vertreibt seinen Sohn und schickt die Tochter in die Küche, a musical play by Hans Werner Henze (57), von Böse, Holt, and Lang to words of Hollmüller, is performed for the first time, in Kindberg.
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September 26, 1984: Sonata for seven players by Hans Werner Henze (58) is performed for the first time, in London.
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October 14, 1984: Deutschlandsberger Mohrentanz I for recorders, guitars, percussion, string quartet, and string orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (58) is performed for the first time, in Deutschlandsberg, Austria.
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October 19, 1984: Deutschlandsberger Mohrentanz II for recorders, guitars, percussion, string quartet, and string orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (58) is performed for the first time, in Deutschlandsberg, Austria.
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December 1, 1984: Symphony no.7 by Hans Werner Henze (58) is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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May 5, 1985: The original uncut version of König Hirsch, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (58) to words of von Cramer, is staged for the first time, in Stuttgart 30 years after it was composed. See 4 October 1957 and 23 September 1956.
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September 10, 1985: Orpheus Behind the Wire for chorus by Hans Werner Henze (59) to words of Bond is performed for the first time, in Southampton.
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September 29, 1985: Selbst- und Zweigespräche for viola, guitar, and chamber organ by Hans Werner Henze (59) is performed for the first time, in Bruhl.
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February 5, 1986: Fandango sopra un basso del Padre Soler for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (59) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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June 1, 1986: Serenade for violin by Hans Werner Henze (59) is performed for the first time, in Bad Godesburg.
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August 27, 1986: Ode an eine Äolsharfe for guitar and fifteen instruments by Hans Werner Henze (60) is performed for the first time, in Lucerne.
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August 29, 1986: Konzertstück for violin and small orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (60) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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December 12, 1986: Sieben Liebeslieder for cello and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (60) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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December 13, 1986: Zwölf kleine Elegien for Renaissance instruments by Hans Werner Henze (60) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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January 24, 1988: Cinque piccoli concerti e ritornelli for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (61) is performed for the first time, in London.
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October 28, 1988: A revised version of Elegy for Young Lovers, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (62) to words of Auden and Kallman, is performed for the first time, in Teatro La Fenice, Venice. See 20 May 1961.
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March 18, 1989: Der heisse Ofen, a comic opera by Peter Maxwell Davies (54), Hans Werner Henze (62), and others, is performed for the first time, at the Kassel Staatstheater.
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June 5, 1989: Tanz- und Salonmusik from the mime-drama Der Idiot by Hans Werner Henze (62) is performed for the first time, in Bristol.
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September 8, 1989: Drei Lieder über den Schnee for soprano, baritone, and eight instruments by Hans Werner Henze (63) to words of Treichel is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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September 12, 1989: Für Manfred for violin by Hans Werner Henze (63) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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September 14, 1989: Festum for orchestra by Luciano Berio (63) is performed for the first time, in Dallas. Also premiered is Allegro brillante for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (63).
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November 11, 1989: At the 92nd Street Y, New York, Peter Serkin plays a program of eleven premieres of works for piano he commissioned. Included are Interlude I for by Leon Kirchner (70), Feurklavier by Luciano Berio (64), Piano Piece by Hans Werner Henze (63), Les Yeux clos II by Toru Takemitsu (59), the first piece from ...in real time op.50 by Alexander Goehr (57), and My Song by Bright Sheng (33).
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May 5, 1990: Hans Werner Henze’s (63) music drama Das verratene Meer to word of Treichel after Mishima, is performed for the first time, in the Deutsche Oper, Berlin.
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May 6, 1990: Introitus, from Hans Werner Henze’s (63) unperformed Requiem, for piano and chamber orchestra, is performed for the first time, in the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden. See 24 February 1993.
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May 11, 1990: The mortal remains of Luigi Nono are laid to rest on the island of San Michele, Venice. Among the mourners is Hans Werner Henze (63).
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May 16, 1990: Five Nocturnes for violin and piano by Hans Werner Henze (63) is performed for the first time, in London.
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August 9, 1990: A revised version of The English Cat, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (64) to words of Bond after Balzac, is performed for the first time, in Montepulciano. See 2 June 1983.
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January 12, 1991: Paraphrasen über Dostojewsky, for actor and eleven instruments by Hans Werner Henze (64) to words of Bachmann, is performed for the first time, in Barbican Hall, London.
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January 14, 1991: A revised version of Das Vokaltuch der Kammersängerin Rosa Silber, a ballet by Hans Werner Henze (64), is performed for the first time, in a concert setting, in London. Also premiered is the Agnus Dei from his unperformed Requiem for piano and strings. See 24 February 1993.
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April 6, 1991: Der verwunschene Wald for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (64) is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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July 28, 1991: Zwei Konzertarien for tenor and small orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (65) to words by von Cramer, are performed for the first time, in Montepulciano.
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December 11, 1991: Dies irae, Ave verum corpus, and Lux aeterna, from Hans Werner Henze’s (63) unperformed Requiem, for piano and chamber orchestra, are performed for the first time, in London. See 24 February 1993.
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July 24, 1992: A revised version of Hans Werner Henze’s (66) opera Der Prinz von Homburg to words of Bachmann after von Kleist, is performed for the first time, in the Bayerischer Staatsoper, Munich.
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November 26, 1992: Rex tremendae, Lacrimosa, and Sanctus, ( Drei geistliche Konzerte ) from Hans Werner Henze’s (63) unperformed Requiem, for piano, trumpet, and chamber orchestra, are performed for the first time, in Suntory Hall, Tokyo. See 24 February 1993.
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February 24, 1993: Requiem, nine sacred concertos for piano, trumpet, and chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (66), is performed completely for the first time, in Berlin. See 6 May 1990, 14 January, 11 December 1991, and 26 November 1992.
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March 25, 1993: Piano Quintet by Hans Werner Henze (66) is performed for the first time, at the University of California, Berkeley.
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May 18, 1993: Adagio adagio, a serenade for piano, violin, and cello by Hans Werner Henze (66) is performed for the first time, in Darmstadt.
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September 12, 1993: Lieder und Tänze aus der Operette La Cubana for mezzo soprano and chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (67) are performed for the first time, in the Kleiner Tonhallesaal, Zürich.
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October 1, 1993: Symphony no.8 by Hans Werner Henze (67) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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August 25, 1994: Introduktion, Thema, und Variationen for cello, harp, and strings by Hans Werner Henze (68) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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November 13, 1994: Toccata mistica for piano by Hans Werner Henze (68) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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March 25, 1995: Appassionatamente for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (68) is performed for the first time, in Vienna.
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March 23, 1996: Knastgesänge, three music-theatre pieces for puppet players, singers, and instrumentalists by Hans Werner Henze (69) to words of Treichel, is performed for the first time, in Theater Basel.
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May 7, 1996: New works are performed for the first time, in Basel: Pol for six players by Wolfgang Rihm (44), Rasche Fuge zur Sache Bach for string quartet by Henri Pousseur (66), and Voie lactée ô soeur lumineuse, a toccata for 19 instruments in honor of Paul Sacher by Hans Werner Henze (69).
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November 7, 1996: Second Sonata for strings by Hans Werner Henze (70) is performed for the first time, in Leipzig.
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January 11, 1997: Venus and Adonis, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (70) to words of Treichel, is performed for the first time, at the Bayerische Staatsoper, Munich.
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January 31, 1997: Erlkönig, a fantasia for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (70), is performed for the first time, in Paris in a concert celebrating the 200th anniversary of the birth of Franz Schubert.
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May 25, 1997: Three ballets by Hans Werner Henze (70) are performed for the first time, in Schwetzingen: Labyrinth to a scenario by Baldwin, Le disperazioni del Signor Pulcinella to a scenario by Sivori after Molière (a revision of Jack Pudding ), and Le fils de l’air to a story by Cocteau. See 29 May 1952 and 30 December 1950.
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June 23, 1997: A Birthday Card for Hans for mezzo-soprano and ensemble by Peter Maxwell Davies (62) to words of da Ponte is performed for the first time, in St. Magnus Cathedral, Orkney. It was composed to celebrate the 70th birthday of Hans Werner Henze (70).
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September 11, 1997: Symphony no.9 for chorus and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (71) to words of Treichel is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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March 26, 1998: Hans Werner Henze (71) is awarded the Bavarian Maximilian Order for Science and Art in Munich.
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May 16, 1998: Violin Concerto no.3 by Hans Werner Henze (71) is performed for the first time, in the Konzerthaus, Berlin.
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November 15, 1998: A revised version of Ballet-Variationen by Hans Werner Henze (72) is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in Berlin. See 28 September 1949 and 21 December 1958.
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May 12, 1999: Trio in three movements for violin, viola, and cello by Hans Werner Henze (72) is performed for the first time, in Schwetzingen.
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November 11, 1999: New works are performed for the first time, in Avery Fisher Hall, New York: Fraternité: Air pour l’orchestre by Hans Werner Henze (73), Vocalise for soprano and orchestra by John Corigliano (61), Oltra mar (Across the Sea) for chorus and orchestra by Kaija Saariaho (47) to words of Maalouf and Said, and America—A Prophecy for mezzo-soprano, orchestra, and chorus ad.lib. by Thomas Adès (28) to words of Chilam Balam and Matteo Flexa.
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November 23, 1999: Sechs Gesänge aus dem Arabischen for tenor and piano by Hans Werner Henze (73) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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January 1, 2000: Album for violin by Hans Werner Henze (73) is performed for the first time, in the Stuttgart Staatsoper.
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February 2, 2000: Sieben Boleros for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (73) is performed for the first time, in Las Palmas, Grand Canary Island.
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March 30, 2000: A Tempest for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (73) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Birmingham.
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April 21, 2000: Cinque canzoni napoletane for solo voice and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (73) to anonymous 17th century texts, is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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June 4, 2000: Aria de la folía española for four saxophones, piano-four hands, and percussion by Hans Werner Henze (63), in Hannover.
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October 22, 2000: Ein kleines Potpourri aus der Oper Boulevard Solitude for flute, piano, vibraphone, and harp by Hans Werner Henze (74) is performed for the first time, at EXPO 2000.
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October 26, 2000: Hans Werner Henze (63) is one of five recipients of the 12th Praemium Imperiale, given by the Japan Art Association and presented by the Japanese imperial family.
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June 29, 2001: Scorribanda Sinfonica for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (74) is performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
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July 1, 2001: Memoiren eines Außenseiters, a film about Hans Werner Henze, is broadcast over the airwaves of Hessische Rundfunk. Today is the composer’s 75th birthday.
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September 11, 2001: L’heure bleu, a serenade for 16 players by Hans Werner Henze (75), is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt.
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September 22, 2001: Notturno for winds, double bass, and piano by Hans Werner Henze (75) is performed for the first time, in Koblenz.
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August 17, 2002: Symphony no.10 by Hans Werner Henze (76) is performed for the first time, in Lucerne.
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August 6, 2003: Prelude to “Tristan” for piano by Hans Werner Henze (77) is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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August 12, 2003: L’Upupa und der Triumph der Sohnesliebe, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (77) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Salzburg.
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August 16, 2003: Englische Balladen und Sonette for piano and cello by Hans Werner Henze (77) is performed for the first time, in the Wiener Saal, Salzburg.
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October 15, 2003: Gogo no Eiko, Das verratene Meer, a Musikdrama by Hans Werner Henze (77) to words of Treichel after Mishima, is performed for the first time, in Suntory Hall, Tokyo.
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December 19, 2003: Appassionatamente plus for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (77) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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February 1, 2004: Aristaeus for narrator and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (77) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in the Konzerthaus, Berlin.
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August 9, 2004: Triplo concerto barocco for chamber orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (78) is performed for the first time, in the Konzerthaus, Berlin.
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February 3, 2005: Fünf Botschaften für die Königin von Saba for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (78) is performed for the first time, in the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées, Paris.
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September 4, 2005: Adagio, Fuge und Mänadentanz von der Oper “Die Bassariden” for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (79) is performed for the first time, in the Laeiszhalle, Hamburg.
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December 22, 2005: Sebastian im Traum for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (79) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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May 11, 2006: “Was können wir tun” from the opera König Hirsch by Hans Werner Henze (79) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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July 6, 2006: Chamber Concerto no.5 for chamber ensemble by Hans Werner Henze (80) is performed for the first time, in Munich.
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September 6, 2007: Phaedra, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (81) to words of Lehnert, is performed for the first time, in the Staatsoper, Berlin.
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October 2, 2008: Elogium Musicum for chorus and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (82) to words of Serpa is performed for the first time, in the Gewandhaus, Leipzig.
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September 25, 2010: Gisela! oder: die merk- und denkwürdigen Wege des Glücks, an opera by Hans Werner Henze (84) to words of Kerstan and Lehnert, is performed for the first time, in Gladbeck, Germany.
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May 26, 2012: An den Wind for chorus and orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (85), to words of Lehnert, is performed for the first time, in the Thomaskirche, Leipzig.
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October 20, 2012: Ouverture zu einem Theater for orchestra by Hans Werner Henze (86) is performed for the first time, at the Deutsche Oper, Berlin.
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October 27, 2012: Hans Werner Henze dies in Dresden, Federal Republic of Germany, aged 86 years, three months, and 26 days. His earthly remains will be laid to rest in Marino, Italy, near Rome.
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September 28, 2013: Nebelheim und Sonnenland by Hans Werner Henze (†0) is performed for the first time, in the Deutsche Oper Berlin.