A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Lou Harrison

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May 14, 1917: Lou Silver Harrison is born in Portland, Oregon, USA, the first of two children born to Clarence Maindenis Harrison, who held several occupations before becoming proprietor of a tire business bought with his wife’s inheritance, and Calline Lillian Silver, daughter of a streetcar mechanic, and owner of the Silver Court Apartments, also bought with her inheritance.
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December 13, 1934: Blue Glass for flute and piano by Lou Harrison (17) is performed for the first time, at his graduation ceremony from Burlingame High School, California, the composer at the keyboard.
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March 26, 1936: Piano Sonata no.1 by Lou Harrison (18) is performed for the first time, at the California School of Fine Arts, San Francisco.
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May 2, 1937: Changing World, a dance with music by Lou Harrison (19) to nine choreographers (including the composer), is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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October 15, 1937: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play The Winter’s Tale by Lou Harrison (20) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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November 16, 1937: Prelude for Grandpiano by Lou Harrison (20) is performed for the first time in the Community Playhouse, San Francisco by the composer.
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June 10, 1938: Incidental music to Euripides play Electra by Lou Harrison (21) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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August 5, 1938: Conquest for flute or ocarina or recorder, piano, conch shell, and percussion by Lou Harrison (21) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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May 19, 1939: Four works for percussion are performed for the first time at the Cornish School in Seattle conducted by John Cage (26): Pulse and Return, both by Henry Cowell (42) and Lou Harrison’s (22) Fifth Simfony and Counterdance in the Spring.
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June 9, 1939: Incidental music to Euripides’ play The Trojan Women by Lou Harrison (22) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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July 6, 1940: Something to Please Everybody for recorder, piano, and percussion by Lou Harrison (23) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland. Also premiered is Harrison’s 16 to 24 for piano and percussion.
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July 18, 1940: John Cage (27) gives an important all-percussion concert at Mills College, Oakland, featuring his own music, as well as that of Henry Cowell (43) and others. Among the performers are Lou Harrison (23), Cage, and his wife Xenia.
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August 2, 1940: Omnipotent Chair for bass and percussion by Lou Harrison (23) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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November 14, 1940: Sanctus for alto and piano by Lou Harrison (23) is performed for the first time, at the San Francisco Museum of Art.
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May 14, 1941: Third Construction for four percussionists by John Cage (28) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco conducted by the composer. Among the performers are Lou Harrison and the composer’s wife. Also premiered are Lou Harrison’s Song of Quetzalcoatl and Simfony #13, both for four percussionists, on the composer’s 24th birthday. The two combine on a piece called Double Music for percussion. The concert is organized entirely by Cage and Harrison.
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May 18, 1941: Exposition of a Cause for piano by Lou Harrison (24) is performed for the first time.
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July 5, 1941: Edgard Varèse (57) sends a telegraph to John Cage (28) and Lou Harrison (24) asking them not to use the term “organized sound” on their recording of Harrison’s Simfony #13. Varèse claims authorship of the term. The two can not comply as the recording is already being produced.
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August 10, 1941: First Concerto for Flute and Percussion by Lou Harrison (24) is performed for the first time, at Bennington College, Vermont by Otto Luening (41), Henry Cowell (44), and Frank Wigglesworth.
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August 24, 1941: Lou Harrison’s (24) dance score Green Mansions is performed for the first time, in Stern Grove, San Francisco.
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May 7, 1942: Fourth Construction for percussion quintet by John Cage (29) is performed for the first time, at the Holloway Playhouse in the Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco. It is now known as Imaginary Landscape no.2 (March). Also premiered are two works by Lou Harrison (24): Canticle #3 for ocarina, percussion, and guitar, and In Praise of Johnny Appleseed for percussion and wooden flute.
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August 9, 1942: Lou Harrison (25) and a friend move from San Francisco, driving to Los Angeles to work with the Lester Horton dance company.
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November 3, 1942: Incidental music to Saroyan’s play The Beautiful People by Lou Harrison (25) is performed for the first time, in Royce Hall of UCLA.
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January 24, 1944: Six Sonatas for cembalo by Lou Harrison (26) are performed completely for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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May 8, 1944: Gigue and Musette for piano by Lou Harrison (26) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles. Also premiered is Harrison’s Suite for piano.
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June 17, 1945: Lou Harrison (28) and John Cage (32) attend a concert in Town Hall, New York of compositions by Alan Hovhaness (34). They are both surprised at the music, how beautiful it is with so few materials, drones and a melody. After the performance, Harrison meets Hovhaness and writes a review for the New York Herald Tribune. Hovhaness will recall, “Lou gave me the first good review I ever had.”
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April 5, 1946: Symphony no.3 “The Camp Meeting” for small orchestra by Charles Ives (71) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Chamber Music Hall, New York, conducted by Lou Harrison (28) 44 years after it was composed. The work will win the 1947 Pulitzer Prize. Also premiered is Harrison’s Motet for the Day of Ascension for chamber orchestra conducted by the composer.
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January 26, 1947: Trio for violin, viola, and cello by Lou Harrison (29) is performed for the first time, at the New School for Social Research, New York.
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February 19, 1947: After years of correspondence and championing of his work, Lou Harrison (29) meets Charles Ives (72) for the first time, in Danbury, Connecticut. Ives asks Harrison to edit his complete works.
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May 5, 1947: It is announced that Charles Ives (72) has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his Symphony no.3, completed around 1911. Ives writes to the man who conducted the premiere last year, Lou Harrison (29), “As you are very much to blame for getting me into that Pulitzer Prize street, and for having a bushel of letters to answer and for having a check of $500 thrown over me by the Trustees of Colum. Uni. you have got to help me by taking 1/2 of this...and the rest I’ll send to the New Music Edition and Arrow Press.” See 5 April 1946.
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December 14, 1947: Western Dance from Merce Cunningham’s dance The Open Road by Lou Harrison (30) is performed for the first time, in the version for six instruments, at Hunter College, New York.
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May 21, 1948: First Suite for Strings by Lou Harrison (31) is performed for the first time, at the National Institute of Arts and Letters as part of a ceremony awarding creative grants to Harrison, Henry Cowell (51), and Vincent Persichetti (33).
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January 23, 1949: The Perilous Chapel a dance by Lou Harrison (31) is performed for the first time, at the Hunter Playhouse, New York.
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March 15, 1949: Suite no.2 for strings by Lou Harrison (31) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University.
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July 29, 1949: Incidental music to Cocteau’s play Marriage at the Eiffel Tower by Lou Harrison (32) is performed for the first time, at Reed College, Oregon conducted by the composer. Also premiered is Harrison’s incidental music to Yeats’ play The Only Jealousy of Emer. See 20 October 1961.
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January 22, 1950: Solstice, a dance for flute, oboe, two cellos, bass, tack-piano, and celesta by Lou Harrison (32), is performed for the first time, in Hunter Playhouse, New York.
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April 15, 1950: Suite for cello and harp by Lou Harrison (32) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University. Also premiered are two movements from Harrison’s Seven Pastorales for chamber orchestra. See 25 November 1951.
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July 28, 1950: An Almanac of the Seasons for voice, speaker, and chamber orchestra by Lou Harrison (33) to words of Breton and Hymes is performed for the first time, at Reed College, Portland, Oregon the composer conducting.
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May 8, 1951: Alleluia for Small Orchestra by Lou Harrison (33) is performed for the first time, in McMillin Theatre, Columbia University.
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July 9, 1951: Io and Prometheus, a dance for piano by Lou Harrison (34), is performed for the first time, at the University of Colorado at Boulder. See 7 September 1985.
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August 24, 1951: The Glyph, a multi-media presentation with music by Lou Harrison (34), is performed for the first time, at Black Mountain College, North Carolina.
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November 25, 1951: Seven Pastorales for chamber orchestra by Lou Harrison (34) is performed completely for the first time, in New York.
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November 29, 1951: Chorales for Spring for piano by Lou Harrison (34) is performed for the first time, at Black Mountain College, North Carolina.
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January 11, 1952: Suite for violin, piano, and small orchestra by Lou Harrison (34) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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February 10, 1952: Two Pastorales for prepared piano by John Cage (39) is performed completely for the first time, in the Cherry Lane Theatre, New York. Also premiered are Fugue for David Tudor for piano by Lou Harrison (34), Intermission 4 and Intermission 5 for piano by Morton Feldman (26), Three Pieces for Piano by Earle Brown (25), and For Piano (I) by Christian Wolff (17). It is the first complete performance of Feldman’s Intermissions 1-5. See 5 July 1951 and 9 December 1951.
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April 23, 1952: Praises for Hummingbirds and Hawks for chamber orchestra by Lou Harrison (34) is performed for the first time, in Brooklyn.
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January 24, 1954: Mass to St. Anthony for chorus, trumpet, harp, and strings by Lou Harrison (36) is performed for the first time, in Carl Fischer Hall, New York.
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March 27, 1954: Lou Harrison (36) departs for Rome where his music is to be performed in a composition contest sponsored by the Congress for Cultural Freedom and the International Conference for Contemporary Music.
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April 14, 1954: An Air from Act 3 of Rapunzel, a chamber opera by Lou Harrison (36) to words of Morris, is performed for the first time, in Rome as part of a composition competition. This will win a 20th Century Masterpiece Award, conferred on Harrison by Igor Stravinsky (71). See 14 May 1959.
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January 18, 1956: Strict Songs for chamber orchestra and male chorus by Lou Harrison (38) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Louisville. See 20 November 1992.
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May 14, 1959: Rapunzel, a chamber opera by Lou Harrison to words of Morris, is performed for the first time, in Kaufmann Auditorium, New York on the composer’s 42nd birthday. See 14 April 1954.
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May 23, 1959: Recitatives from Lou Harrison’s (42) Political Primer to his own words are performed for the first time, at the University of Buffalo.
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November 19, 1959: Concerto for violin with percussion orchestra by Lou Harrison (42) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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January 16, 1961: Labyrinth #3 for percussion by Lou Harrison (43) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York, 20 years after it was composed.
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March 25, 1961: Lou Harrison (43) boards a freighter in California making for Japan where he has been invited to the East-West Music Encounter Conference in Tokyo.
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October 18, 1961: Suite for Symphonic Strings by Lou Harrison (44) is performed for the first time, in Louisville.
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October 20, 1961: A suite from Lou Harrison’s (44) incidental music to Cocteau’s play Marriage at the Eiffel Tower is performed for the first time, in Santa Cruz, California. See 29 July 1949.
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November 12, 1961: Two works by Lou Harrison (44) are performed for the first time, in Aptos, California: Psalter Sonato for great psaltery or cheng, and Prelude for Piri and Reed Organ.
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January 21, 1962: Concerto in Slendro for violin, two tack-pianos, celesta, and percussion by Lou Harrison (44) is performed for the first time, in Santa Cruz, California.
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May 20, 1962: Alma Redemptoris Mater for baritone, violin, trombone, and tack piano by Lou Harrison (45) is performed for the first time, in Nepenthe, California.
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February 17, 1963: May Rain for voice, piano, and percussion by Lou Harrison (45) to words of Gidlow is performed for the first time, in Aptos, California, 22 years after it was composed. Also premiered is Harrison’s Holly and Ivy: A Carol for tenor, harp, two violins, cello, and bass.
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February 28, 1963: Suite for Percussion by Lou Harrison (45) is performed for the first time, in the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 21 years after it was composed.
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March 9, 1963: An expanded version of Jephtha’s Daughter, a theatre piece with flute, percussion, and other optional instruments by Lou Harrison (45), is performed for the first time, at Cabrillo College, Aptos, California. See 26 February 1941.
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March 17, 1963: Sonata for unaccompanied violin by Lou Harrison (45) is performed for the first time, in Aptos, California, 27 years after it was composed.
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May 26, 1963: Pacifika Rondo for various eastern and western instruments by Lou Harrison (46) is performed for the first time, at the University of Hawaii.
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August 2, 1963: Pied Beauty for baritone, cello, and percussion by Lou Harrison (46) to words of Hopkins is performed for the first time, in San Francisco, 23 years after it was composed.
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October 12, 1964: Party Pieces for wind quintet by Virgil Thomson (67), Henry Cowell (67), John Cage (52), and Lou Harrison (47) is performed for the first time, in the San Francisco Tape Music Center.
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November 15, 1964: Wesak Sonata for cheng by Lou Harrison (47) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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August 23, 1965: Symphony on G for orchestra by Lou Harrison (48) is performed for the first time, at Cabrillo College, Aptos, California.
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April 3, 1966: Easter Cantata for alto, chorus, two trumpets, two trombones, glockenspiel, chimes, harp, and strings by Lou Harrison (48) to words of St. Luke is performed for the first time, at Hartnell College, Salinas, California.
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May 1, 1967: Music for Violin with Various Instruments, European, Asian, and African by Lou Harrison (49) is performed for the first time, at San Jose State University, California.
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November 19, 1967: In Memory of Victor Jowers for clarinet or english horn and piano or harp by Lou Harrison (50) is performed for the first time, at the memorial service in Aptos, California.
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April 7, 1968: Peace Piece 1: Invocation for the Health of all Beings for chorus and chamber orchestra to Buddhist words, and Peace Piece 2 for tenor and chamber orchestra to words of Duncan, both by Lou Harrison (50) are performed for the first time, in the First Unitarian Church, Berkeley, California.
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August 4, 1968: Incidental music to Corneille’s play Cinna by Lou Harrison (51) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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August 17, 1968: Three works by Lou Harrison (51) are performed for the first time, in Aptos, California: France 1917-Spain 1937 (About the Spanish War) for string quartet and percussion (31 years after it was composed), Peace Piece 3: Little Song on the Atom Bomb for voice, two violins, viola, and harp to his own words, and Nova Odo for chorus and orchestra to his own words (first complete).
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May 22, 1969: Orpheus--for the Singer to the Dance for tenor, chorus, and percussion by Lou Harrison (52) to words of Duncan, is performed for the first time, at San Jose State University, California.
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July 23, 1970: At the Tomb of Charles Ives for trombone, two psalteries, two dulcimers, three harps, tam-tam, five violins, viola, cello, and bass by Lou Harrison (53) is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado.
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November 5, 1971: Young Caesar, a puppet opera by Lou Harrison (54) to words of Gordon and the composer, is performed for the first time, at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. See 9 April 1988.
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August 11, 1972: La Koro Sutro (The Heart Sutra) for chorus, organ, harp, and gamelan by Lou Harrison (55) is performed for the first time, at San Francisco State University.
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November 13, 1972: Festive Movement for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano by Lou Harrison (55) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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April 30, 1973: Concerto for organ with percussion orchestra by Lou Harrison (55) is performed for the first time, at San Jose State University.
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December 9, 1974: Suite for violin with American gamelan by Lou Harrison (57) is performed for the first time, at Lone Mountain College, San Francisco.
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December 7, 1975: Elegiac Symphony (Symphony no.2) for orchestra by Lou Harrison (58) is performed for the first time, in the Paramount Theatre, Oakland.
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August 14, 1976: Bomba for percussion by Lou Harrison (59) is performed for the first time, in Aptos, California, 37 years after it was composed.
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February 25, 1977: Binary Variations on “O Sinner Man” for Renaissance instruments by Lou Harrison (59) is performed for the first time, at the University of California at Santa Cruz.
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August 27, 1978: Threnody for Carlos Chávez (†0) for viola and Sundanese gam degung by Lou Harrison (61) is performed for the first time, in Santa Cruz, California.
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January 26, 1979: Serenade for Guitar with Optional Percussion by Lou Harrison (61) is performed for the first time, in Schenectady, New York.
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February 3, 1979: Waltz for Evelyn Hinrichsen for piano by Lou Harrison (61) is performed for the first time, at The Kitchen, New York.
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April 28, 1979: String Quartet Set by Lou Harrison (61) is performed for the first time, at the University of Toronto.
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May 9, 1980: Scenes from Cavafy for baritone, male chorus, harp, and Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (62) to words of Cavafy paraphrased by the composer, is performed for the first time, at San Jose State University.
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November 13, 1980: Double Fanfare for percussion by Lou Harrison (63) and Anthony Cirone is performed for the first time, in San Jose Civic Auditorium.
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February 18, 1981: Gending Hermes for Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (63) is performed for the first time, in Evans Auditorium, Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon.
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April 22, 1981: Gending Alexander for Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (63) is performed for the first time, at the University of Delaware.
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June 13, 1981: Estampie for Susan Summerfield for organ by Lou Harrison (64) is performed for the first time, in Chico, California.
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May 10, 1982: Double Concerto for violin, cello, and gamelan by Lou Harrison (64) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland. Also premiered is the first movement of Harrison’s Tributes to Charon for percussion.
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June 10, 1982: Beyond the Far Blue Mountains, a film score by Lou Harrison (65) is performed for the first time, in Centre de Pompidou, Paris.
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August 26, 1982: Two works are performed for the first time, in Aptos, California: Elegy, to the Memory of Calvin Simmons for eleven instruments by Lou Harrison (65), and Piece for Small Orchestra no.1 by Conlon Nancarrow (69), 42 years after it was composed.
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August 29, 1982: Third Symphony for orchestra by Lou Harrison (65) is performed for the first time, in Aptos, California.
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December 9, 1982: Incidental music for the narrative Richard Whittington for gamelan and voice by Lou Harrison (65) to words of Masefield is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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September 28, 1983: Lagu Cirebon for Cirebonese gamelan by Lou Harrison (66) is performed for the first time, at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
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December 7, 1984: For the Pleasure of Ovid’s Changes for Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (67) is performed for the first time, at Mills College, Oakland.
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February 16, 1985: Gending Vincent for Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (67) is performed for the first time, at the University of Oregon in Eugene.
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May 9, 1985: Faust for soprano, tenor, bass, chorus, chamber orchestra, and Sundanese gamelan degung by Lou Harrison (67) to words of Foley after Goethe, is performed for the first time, at the University of California at Santa Cruz.
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September 7, 1985: Io and Prometheus, a dance for chamber ensemble by Lou Harrison (68), is performed for the first time, in Athens. See 9 July 1951.
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September 28, 1985: Three Songs for male chorus and chamber ensemble by Lou Harrison (68) to words of Whitman and the Bible is performed for the first time, in Portland, Oregon.
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October 20, 1985: Piano Concerto with Selected Orchestra by Lou Harrison (68) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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February 28, 1987: Varied Trio for violin, piano, percussion, harp, and bells by Lou Harrison (69) is performed for the first time, in Hertz Hall, Berkeley, California.
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May 14, 1987: Two works by Lou Harrison are performed for the first time, at Mills College in Oakland on the composer’s 70th birthday: Ariadne, a dance for flute and percussion, and Concerto for piano with Javanese gamelan.
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May 17, 1987: Philemon and Baukis for violin and Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (70) is performed for the first time, in All Saints Episcopal Church, Watsonville, California.
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August 14, 1987: The Clays’ Quintet for trumpet, horn, mandolin, harp, and percussion by Lou Harrison (70) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 15, 1987: Three movements from the Mass for Saint Cecilia’s Day for chorus, harp, and optional organ by Lou Harrison (70) are performed for the first time, at California State University, Sacramento. See 18 November 1988.
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February 28, 1988: A Summerfield Set for piano by Lou Harrison (70) is performed for the first time, at Mills College in Oakland.
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April 9, 1988: Young Caesar, an opera by Lou Harrison (70) to words of Gordon and the composer, is performed as a stage opera for the first time, at the Portland (Oregon) Center for the Performing Arts. See 5 November 1971.
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July 28, 1988: Grand Duo for violin and piano by Lou Harrison (71) is performed for the first time, in Aptos, California.
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November 18, 1988: Mass for Saint Cecilia’s Day for chorus, harp, and optional organ by Lou Harrison (71) are performed completely for the first time, in Santa Cruz, California. See 15 November 1987.
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March 17, 1989: Pedal Sonata for organ by Lou Harrison (71) is performed for the first time, at the Central United Methodist Church in Stockton, California.
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November 28, 1989: New Moon, a dance for flute, clarinet, trumpet, trombone, violin, bass, and percussion by Lou Harrison (72) is performed for the first time, in Joyce Theatre, New York.
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January 13, 1990: A Soedjatmoko Set for chorus, solo voice, and Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (72) is performed for the first time, at Lewis and Clark College, Portland, Oregon.
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April 3, 1990: Piano Trio by Lou Harrison (72) is performed for the first time, in Houston.
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November 2, 1990: Last Symphony (Symphony no.4) for baritone and orchestra by Lou Harrison (73) is performed for the first time, at the Brooklyn Academy Opera House.
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October 4, 1991: Homage to Pacifica for chorus, solo voice, narrator, Javanese gamelan, bassoon, harp, psaltery, and percussion by Lou Harrison (74) to words of Twain, Chief Seattle, and the composer, is performed for the first time.
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March 7, 1992: Songs in the Forest for flute, violin, piano, vibraphone, and narrator by Lou Harrison (74) to his own words is performed for the first time, in De Young Museum, San Francisco.
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April 6, 1992: Now Sleep the Mountains, All for chorus, percussion, and two pianos by Lou Harrison (74) is performed for the first time, at San Jose State University.
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July 17, 1992: Gending Max Beckmann for Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (75) is performed for the first time, at Lick Observatory, California.
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November 20, 1992: Strict Songs, in the setting for baritone, chorus, and chamber orchestra by Lou Harrison (75) to his own words, is performed for the first time, at the University of California at Santa Cruz. See 18 January 1956.
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November 27, 1992: Tandy’s Tango for piano by Lou Harrison (75) is performed for the first time.
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January 14, 1993: Suite for Four Haisho (Japanese panpipes) with percussion and narrator by Lou Harrison (75) to his own words is performed for the first time.
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March 1, 1994: An Old Times Tune for Merce Cunningham’s 75th Birthday for string quartet and piano by Lou Harrison (76) is performed for the first time, at Lincoln Center, New York.
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April 25, 1994: Canticle and Round in Honor of Gerhard Samuel’s Birthday for percussion by Lou Harrison (76) is performed for the first time, at the University of Cincinnati.
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May 15, 1994: Gending Moon for male voice and Javanese gamelan by Lou Harrison (77) to his own words is performed for the first time, at Cabrillo College, Aptos, California.
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August 18, 1994: Vestiunt Silve for soprano, flute, two violas, and harp by Lou Harrison (77) to a Goliard song, is performed for the first time, in Dartington Hall, Totnes, Devon.
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October 22, 1994: New York Waltzes for piano by Lou Harrison (77) are performed for the first time, in Aptos, California, 43 years after they were composed.
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May 13, 1995: Suite for cello and piano by Lou Harrison is performed for the first time, in All Saints Episcopal Church, Watsonville, California on the eve of the composer’s 78th birthday.
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September 6, 1995: A Parade for MTT for orchestra by Lou Harrison (78) is performed for the first time, in Davies Hall, San Francisco.
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September 8, 1995: New First Suite for Strings by Lou Harrison (78) is performed for the first time, on Majorca.
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October 27, 1996: Devotions, a film with music by Lou Harrison (79), is shown for the first time, at the Seattle Lesbian and Gay Festival.
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December 6, 1996: Suite for Sangen for shamisen by Lou Harrison (79) is performed for the first time.
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March 6, 1997: Rhymes with Silver, a dance for violin, viola, cello, piano, and percussion by Lou Harrison (79) is performed for the first time, in Zellerbach Hall, Berkeley, California.
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March 18, 1997: Festival Dance for two pianos by Lou Harrison (79) is performed for the first time, at Cooper Union College, New York, 46 years after it was composed.
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March 25, 1997: A 12-Tone Morning After to Amuse Henry for piano by Lou Harrison (79) is performed for the first time, at the 92nd Street Y, New York, 52 years after it was composed. This is the centennial year of its dedicatee, Henry Cowell (†31).
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April 26, 1997: Concerto for P’i-p’a with String Orchestra by Lou Harrison (79) is performed for the first time, in Lincoln Center, New York.
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February 2, 2003: Lou Silver Harrison dies of heart failure in Lafayette, Indiana, USA while traveling to attend a concert of his music in Columbus, Ohio aged 85 years, eight months, and 19 days.  His mortal remains will be cremated.
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September 27, 2005: for Lou Harrison for string quartet, strings, and two pianos by John Luther Adams (52) is performed for the first time, at the New England Conservatory of Music, Boston.