A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

John Harbison

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December 20, 1938: John Harris Harbison is born in Orange, New Jersey, USA, the son of Elmore Harris Harbison, a history professor at Princeton University, and Janet German.
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August 20, 1961: Duo for flute and piano by John Harbison (22) is performed for the first time, at the Brooklyn Museum, New York.
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December 18, 1962: He Shall Not Cry for female chorus and organ by John Harbison (23) is performed for the first time, in the Princeton University Chapel.
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March 10, 1964: Sinfonia for violin and orchestra by John Harbison (25) is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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February 28, 1973: Five Songs of Experience on Poems of William Blake for chorus, percussion, and string quartet by John Harbison (34) is performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre of Harvard University.
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August 12, 1973: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play The Merchant of Venice by John Harbison (34) is performed for the first time, in Francestown, New Hampshire.
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January 12, 1975: Elegiac Songs for mezzo-soprano and chamber orchestra by John Harbison (36) to words of Emily Dickinson is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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February 27, 1976: Music When Soft Voices Die for chorus by John Harbison (37) to words of Shelley is performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre of Harvard University.
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November 13, 1976: Three Harp Songs for tenor and harp by John Harbison (37) to words of Fried, Hamilton, and Snyder are performed for the first time, in Pickman Auditorium of the Longy School of Music, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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March 10, 1977: Diotima for orchestra by John Harbison (38) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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November 13, 1977: Book of Hours and Seasons for mezzo-soprano, flute, cello, and piano by John Harbison (38) to words of Goethe is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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February 25, 1978: The Flower-Fed Buffaloes for baritone, chorus, and seven players by John Harbison (39) is performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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November 7, 1978: Samuel Chapter for voice, flute, clarinet (or percussion or piano or viola), and cello by John Harbison (39) is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts directed by the composer.
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April 15, 1979: Quintet for Winds by John Harbison (40) is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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April 30, 1979: Full Moon in March, an opera by John Harbison (40) to his own words after Yeats, is performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre of Harvard University.
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August 20, 1979: Winter’s Tale, an opera by John Harbison (40) to his own words after Shakespeare, is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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May 12, 1980: Concerto for piano by John Harbison (41) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York, conducted by Gunther Schuller (54).
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July 14, 1980: Descant-Nocturne for orchestra by John Harbison (41) is performed for the first time.
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January 24, 1981: Concerto for violin by John Harbison (42) is performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston.
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August 4, 1981: Mottetti di Montale for soprano and piano by John Harbison (42) is performed for the first time, in Santa Fe, New Mexico. See 29 October 2000.
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August 7, 1981: Piano Quintet by John Harbison (42) is performed for the first time, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
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December 12, 1981: Nunc dimittis for male chorus by John Harbison (42) is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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July 23, 1982: Variations for clarinet, violin and piano by John Harbison (43) is performed for the first time, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
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February 15, 1983: Exequien for Calvin Simmons for alto flute, bass clarinet (or vibraphone or piano or two violas), and cello by John Harbison (44) is performed for the first time, at Williams College, Williamstown, Massachusetts.
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November 15, 1983: Mirabai Songs for soprano and piano by John Harbison (44) are performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston. See 1 February 1984.
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February 1, 1984: Mirabai Songs in the version for chamber ensemble and piano by John Harbison (45) are performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge conducted by Gunther Schuller (58). See 15 November 1983.
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March 6, 1984: Ulysses’ Raft for orchestra by John Harbison (45) is performed for the first time, in New Haven, Connecticut.
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March 22, 1984: Symphony no.1 by John Harbison (45) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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May 11, 1984: Ulysses’ Bow for orchestra by John Harbison (45) is performed for the first time, in Pittsburgh.
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March 22, 1985: Twighlight Music for horn, violin and piano by John Harbison (46) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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June 14, 1985: Concerto for oboe, clarinet, and strings by John Harbison (46) is performed for the first time, in Sarasota, Florida.
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October 11, 1985: String Quartet no.1 by John Harbison (46) is performed for the first time, in Corcoran Gallery, Washington.
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October 17, 1985: Prelude, Aria, and Waltz for orchestra by Arthur Berger (73) is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts directed by John Harbison (46). It is a reworking of his Three Pieces for String orchestra of 1946. See 26 January 1946.
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April 18, 1986: Music for 18 Winds by John Harbison (47) is performed for the first time, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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September 11, 1986: Remembering Gatsby, a foxtrot for orchestra by John Harbison (47), is performed for the first time, in Atlanta.
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October 11, 1986: Fanfare for Foley’s for brass and percussion by John Harbison (47) is performed for the first time, in Houston.
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November 21, 1986: The Flight Into Egypt, a cantata for soprano, baritone, chorus, and orchestra by John Harbison (47), is performed for the first time, at New England Conservatory, Boston. It will win the Pulitzer Prize. See 16 April 1987.
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April 16, 1987: John Harbison (48) is awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Music for his The Flight Into Egypt . See 21 November 1986.
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May 13, 1987: Symphony no.2 by John Harbison (48) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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October 3, 1987: Three Occasional Pieces for piano by John Harbison (48) are performed for the first time, in Kresge Auditorium of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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November 20, 1987: String Quartet no.2 by John Harbison (48) is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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December 21, 1987: Magnum Mysterium for brass quintet by John Harbison (49) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York.
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February 1, 1988: Rot und Weiss for voice, flute (or clarinet or violin), and cello by John Harbison (49) to words of Giraud (tr. Hartleben) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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February 12, 1988: Moments of Vision for soprano/handbells, tenor/handbells, and a consort of Renaissance instruments by John Harbison (49) to words of Hardy is performed for the first time, at Amherst College, Massachusetts.
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July 15, 1988: Piano Sonata no.1 by John Harbison (49) is performed for the first time, in Amherst, Massachusetts. It is dedicated to the memory of Roger Sessions (†3).
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October 24, 1988: Several works in honor of the 50th birthday of Joan Tower are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York, including For Joan on her 50 th for five players by John Corigliano (50), Minuet from Short Suite for four players by John Harbison (49), and Tower Power for five players by Joseph Schwantner (45).
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November 7, 1988: New works to words of Giraud (tr. Hartleben) are performed for the first time, in Los Angeles County Museum of Art: the first of the three Pierrot Songs for voice, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano by Leslie Bassett (65), Not Only Night for soprano, flute/piccolo, clarinet in E flat/bass clarinet, piano, violin, cello, and electronic sound generators by Roger Reynolds (54), and Im Spiegel for voice, violin, and piano by John Harbison (49). See 25 January 1989.
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December 2, 1988: Fantasy Duo for violin and piano by John Harbison (49) is performed for the first time, at the Library of Congress, Washington.
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November 13, 1989: The Natural World for voice, flute, clarinet (or piano or violin), and cello by John Harbison (50) to words of Bly, Stevens, and Wright is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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November 30, 1989: November 19, 1828 for piano quartet by John Harbison (50) is performed for the first time, in Atlanta.
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December 1, 1989: Nocturne for brass quintet by John Harbison (50) is performed for the first time, in Washington Square Church, New York.
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December 24, 1989: Several works by John Harbison (51) are performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York: Christmas Vespers for narrator and brass quintet, Little Fantasy on The Twelve Days of Christmas for brass quintet, Two Choral Preludes for Advent for brass quintet, and The Three Wise Men for brass quintet and narrator.
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April 26, 1990: Concerto for double brass choir and orchestra by John Harbison (51) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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May 9, 1990: Words from Paterson for baritone, flute/alto flute, oboe/english horn (or harp), piano (or viola), and cello by John Harbison (51) to words of Williams is performed for the first time, in the Kennedy Center, Washington.
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May 18, 1990: Concerto for viola by John Harbison (51) is performed for the first time, in Bridgewater, New Jersey.
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May 22, 1990: Simple Daylight for soprano and piano by John Harbison (51) to words of Fried is performed for the first time, in Herbst Theatre, San Francisco.
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December 17, 1990: Two Emmanuel Motets for chorus by John Harbison (51) are performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston.
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January 3, 1991: Ave Verum Corpus for chorus by John Harbison (52) is performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston. See 2 June 1991.
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February 14, 1991: David’s Fascinating Rhythm Method for orchestra by John Harbison (52) is performed for the first time, in Baltimore.
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February 28, 1991: Symphony no.3 by John Harbison (52) is performed for the first time, in Baltimore.
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June 2, 1991: Ave Verum Corpus for chorus and strings by John Harbison (52) is performed for the first time, in Ojai, California. See 3 January 1991.
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July 27, 1991: Between Two Worlds for soprano, two pianos and two cellos by John Harbison (52) to words of Bly and Boehme is performed for the first time, in Highland Park, Illinois.
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October 14, 1991: The Rewaking for soprano and string quartet by John Harbison (52) to words of Williams is performed for the first time, in Pittsburgh.
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November 17, 1991: Four More Occasional Pieces for piano by John Harbison (52) is performed for the first time, in First and Second Church, Boston.
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January 11, 1992: The Flute of Interior Time for baritone and piano by John Harbison (53) to words of Kabir (tr. Bly) is performed for the first time, in the Shauspielhaus, Berlin.
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March 26, 1992: Fanfares and Reflection for two violins by John Harbison (53) is performed for the first time, in Renée Weiler Concert Hall, New York.
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April 11, 1992: Due Libri for mezzo-soprano and chamber ensemble by John Harbison (53) is performed for the first time, in the Nauraushaun Presbyterian Church, Pearl River, New York.
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December 3, 1992: Concerto for oboe by John Harbison (53) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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December 13, 1992: John Harbison’s (53) longer setting of O Magnum Mysterium for chorus is performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston.
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April 3, 1993: I, II, III, IV, V: Fantasia on a Ground for strings by John Harbison (54) is performed for the first time, at the Music School at Rivers, Weston, Massachusetts. Also premiered are Harbison’s shorter setting of O Magnum Mysterium for chorus, the first three of the Inventions for a Young Percussionist, the theme and two variations of Variations (in first position) for string quartet, and the first three of the Inventions for a Young Pianist .
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August 2, 1993: Three City Blocks for band by John Harbison (54) is performed for the first time, at the Hilton Hotel Convention Center, Fort Smith, Arkansas.
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October 22, 1993: The Most Often Used Chords for orchestra by John Harbison (54) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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January 16, 1994: Communion Words for chorus by John Harbison (55) is performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston.
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April 7, 1994: Concerto for cello by John Harbison (55) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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April 17, 1994: Concerning Them Which Are Asleep for chorus by John Harbison (55) is performed for the first time, in Emmanuel Church, Boston.
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April 30, 1994: String Quartet no.3 by John Harbison (55) is performed for the first time, at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts.
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August 16, 1995: Requiem der Versöhung for vocal soloists, chorus and orchestra is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart. Among the 13 composers contributing to the work are Luciano Berio (69), György Kurtág (69), Krzysztof Penderecki (61), Alfred Schnittke (60), John Harbison (56), and Wolfgang Rihm (43).
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November 24, 1995: Flute Concerto by John Harbison (56) is performed for the first time, in Minneapolis.
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February 20, 1997: Olympic Dances for orchestra by John Harbison (58) is performed for the first time, in Denton, Texas. See 27 February 1997.
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February 27, 1997: Olympic Dances, a ballet by John Harbison, is performed for the first time, in Atlanta. See 20 February 1997.
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October 31, 1997: Fanfare for the Free Man for three oboes and three bassoons by John Harbison (58) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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January 22, 1999: La Primavera de Sottoripa for soprano and chamber ensemble by John Harbison (60) is performed for the first time, in Eugene, Oregon.
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April 22, 1999: Four Psalms for vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra by John Harbison (60) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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December 20, 1999: The Great Gatsby, an opera by John Harbison to words of Horwitz and the composer after Fitzgerald, is performed for the first time, at the Metropolitan Opera, New York on the composer’s 61st birthday.
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March 2, 2000: New works for solo piano are performed for the first time, in Weill Recital Hall, New York: Two Diversions for piano by Elliott Carter (91), On an Unwritten Letter by John Harbison (61), Image de Moreau by Louis Andriessen (60), Zwiesprache for piano by Wolfgang Rihm (47), and Dew-Fall-Drops by Tan Dun (42).
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October 29, 2000: Mottetti di Montale for mezzo-soprano and strings by John Harbison (61) is performed for the first time, in Boston. See 4 August 1981.
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March 7, 2001: Partita for orchestra by John Harbison (62) is performed for the first time, in Minneapolis.
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April 9, 2001: Chaconne for flute, clarinet, violin, cello and piano by John Harbison (62) is performed for the first time, at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music.
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May 13, 2001: North and South for mezzo-soprano, english horn, bassoon, violin, viola, cello, and double bass by John Harbison (62) to words of Bishop is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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October 26, 2001: Six American Painters for oboe, violin, viola, and cello by John Harbison (62) is performed for the first time, in Brookline, Massachusetts. See 14 April 2002.
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April 14, 2002: Six American Painters in the version for flute, violin, viola, and cello by John Harbison (63) is performed for the first time, in Cincinnati. See 26 October 2001.
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May 2, 2002: Two Songs on Poetry of Elizabeth Bishop for soprano and chamber ensemble by John Harbison (63) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 6, 2003: Requiem for four vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra by John Harbison (64) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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April 13, 2003: Piano Sonata no.2 by John Harbison (64) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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August 3, 2003: String Quartet no.4 by John Harbison (63) is performed for the first time, in La Jolla, California.
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August 26, 2003: Cucaraccia and Fugue for four violas by John Harbison (64) is performed for the first time, in Madison, Wisconsin. The composer plays one part. Also premiered is Harbison’s The Violist’s Notebook, Book II for solo viola.
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October 25, 2003: December 1 for mezzo-soprano and chamber ensemble by John Harbison (64) to words of Milosz is performed for the first time, in Tallahassee, Florida.
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November 2, 2003: We do not live to ourselves for chorus by John Harbison (64) to words of the Bible is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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January 12, 2004: Abraham, a motet for chorus and brass by John Harbison (65) to words of Genesis, is performed for the first time, at the Vatican.
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February 19, 2004: Fantasy on “Nobody Knows” for baritone and orchestra by David Del Tredici (67) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York. Also premiered is Ain’t Goin’ to Study War No Mo’ for baritone and chamber ensemble by John Harbison (65).
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April 18, 2004: Montale Sketches for piano by John Harbison (65) is performed for the first time, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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April 24, 2004: Aria for mezzo-soprano, oboe, clarinet, horn, bassoon, and piano by John Harbison (65) to words of Bishop is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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June 17, 2004: Symphony no.4 by John Harbison (65) is performed for the first time, in Seattle.
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July 1, 2004: Trio for violin, cello, and piano by John Harbison (65) is performed for the first time, in Bedford Hill, New York.
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October 24, 2004: Songs America Loves to Sing for flute, clarinet, violin, cello, and piano by John Harbison (65) is performed for the first time, in Atlanta.
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March 24, 2005: Two new works are performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston: Piano Concerto no.4 by Charles Wuorinen (66), and Darkbloom, Overture for an Imagined Opera for orchestra by John Harbison (66).
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February 3, 2006: Milosz Songs a cycle for voice and orchestra by John Harbison (67) to words of Milosz is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 19, 2006: But Mary Stood (Sacred Symphony) for soprano, chorus and strings by John Harbison (67) to words of the Bible is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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April 1, 2006: Concerto for Bass Viol by John Harbison (67) is performed for the first time, in Toronto.
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July 25, 2006: A performance of Igor Stravinsky’s (†25) L’Histoire du Soldat takes place at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts. The part of the soldier is taken by Elliott Carter (97), the devil is Milton Babbitt (90), and the narrator is read by John Harbison (67).
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December 23, 2006: Two works are performed for the first time, in St. Thomas’ Church, New York: Unto Us is Born a Son for chorus by John Harbison (68) and Unto us a son is born for chorus and organ by John Tavener (62).
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February 25, 2007: Umbrian Landscape with Saint for chamber orchestra and optional chorus by John Harbison (68) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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January 27, 2008: Madrigal for chorus by John Harbison (69) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 13, 2008: Cortège for six percussionists by John Harbison (69) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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April 17, 2008: Symphony no.5 by John Harbison (69) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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April 27, 2008: God Only Knows for voice and piano by John Harbison (69) is performed for the first time, at the Guggenheim Museum, New York.
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June 22, 2008: An orchestral suite from John Harbison’s (69) opera The Great Gatsby is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado.
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March 29, 2009: A Clear Midnight for soprano, male chorus, and string quintet by John Harbison (70) is performed for the first time, at Indiana University.
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April 24, 2009: French Horn Suite for four horns by John Harbison (70) is performed for the first time, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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April 27, 2009: The Seven Ages for mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet, violin, cello, percussion, and piano by John Harbison (70) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Hall, New York.
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May 3, 2009: Mary Lou for orchestra by John Harbison (70) is performed for the first time, in Pittsburgh.
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October 13, 2009: Leonard Stein Anagrams for piano by John Harbison (70) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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April 8, 2010: Double Concerto for violin, cello, and orchestra by John Harbison (71) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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April 30, 2010: Diamond Watch for two pianos by John Harbison (71) is performed for the first time, in Kresge Auditorium of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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July 9, 2011: Marian Tropes for string quartet by Charles Wuorinen (73) is performed for the first time, in Portland, Oregon. Also premiered is Finale, Presto for string quartet by John Harbison (72).
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October 16, 2011: Closer to My Own Life for mezzo-soprano and orchestra by John Harbison (72) to words of Munro, is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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January 12, 2012: Symphony no.6 for soprano and orchestra by John Harbison (73) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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April 21, 2012: String Quartet no.5 by John Harbison (73) is performed for the first time, in Madison, Wisconsin.
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April 24, 2012: Sonata for violin and piano no.1 by John Harbison (73) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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August 26, 2012: Koussevitzky Said for chorus and orchestra by John Harbison (73), to sayings of the maestro, is performed for the first time, at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts.
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October 21, 2012: Two works are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York: The Pool for chorus and piano by John Harbison (73), and Alphabet II for chorus by David Del Tredici (75) to words of The New England Primer .
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August 16, 2013: Bullycide for piano, string quartet, and double bass by David Del Tredici (76), is performed for the first time, in La Jolla, California. Also premiered is Crossroads in a version for soprano, oboe, two violins, viola, cello and double bass by John Harbison (74) to words of Glück. See 19 September 2013.
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September 19, 2013: Crossroads by John Harbison (74) to words of Glück, is performed for the first time, in a version for soprano, oboe, and string orchestra, in Stillwater, Minnesota. See 16 August 2013.
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April 6, 2014: The Right to Pleasure, a cycle for mezzo-soprano and string quintet by John Harbison (75), to words of Fisher, is performed for the first time, at the Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia.
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May 9, 2014: The Supper at Emmaus, a cantata for chorus, winds, organ, and strings by John Harbison (75), to words of the Bible, is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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September 11, 2014: String Trio by John Harbison (75) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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January 31, 2015: For Violin Alone by John Harbison (76) is performed for the first time, in the 92nd Street Y, New York.
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April 3, 2015: Never Time for jazz ensemble by John Harbison (76) is performed for the first time, in Kresge Auditorium of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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April 30, 2015: Rubies (after Thelonious Monk’s ‘Ruby My Dear’) for symphonic band by John Harbison (76) is performed for the first time, in New Brunswick, New Jersey.
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July 24, 2015: Seven Poems of Lorine Niedecker for voice and piano by John Harbison (76) is performed for the first time, at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts. Also premiered is Birkat Haderekh for clarinet, violin, cello, and piano by Shulamit Ran (65), conducted by John Harbison.
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May 7, 2016: The Nine Rasas for clarinet, viola, and piano by John Harbison (77) is performed for the first time, at the Longy School of Music, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
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May 22, 2016: The Cross of Snow for countertenor and four violas da gamba by John Harbison (77) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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January 25, 2017: A Bag of Tails (Codas for solo piano) by John Harbison (78) is performed for the first time, in Brooklyn, New York.
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March 5, 2017: Presences for cello, string quartet, and bass viol by John Harbison (78) is performed for the first time, in St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, New York.