A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Sofiya Asgatovna Gubaydulina

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June 7, 1940: Sofiya Gubaidulina (8) gets her first review, in Komsomolets Tatarii, her hometown newspaper in Kazan. It is a performance she gave with her sister Ida playing piano.
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November 12, 1951: Sofiya Gubaidulina (20) attends a concert by the pianist Mariya Venianimovna Yudina in Kazan. Yudina, a devout believer, bows her head and makes a sign of the cross. This is a profound moment for Gubaidulina, who is privately harboring religious beliefs.
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December 19, 1952: Sofia Gubaidulina (21), a student at Kazan Conservatory, wins a Stalin Scholarship.
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January 22, 1956: Sofia Gubaidulina (24) marries Mark Alyeksandrovich Liando, a geologist, in Moscow.
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June 25, 1956: Today’s edition of Soviet Musician identifies Sofia Gubaidulina (24) as the winner of first prize in gymnastics at an athletic competition of students at all of Moscow’s higher education institutions. She is studying at Moscow Conservatory.
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May 12, 1957: In a recital at Moscow Conservatory, Glenn Gould performs the Piano Sonata of Alban Berg (†21), the Piano Variations op.27 of Anton Webern (†11), and two movements from the Piano Sonata no.3 of Ernst Krenek (57). Among the audience is Sofiya Gubaidulina (25).
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June 19, 1959: At ceremonies marking graduation from Moscow Conservatory, works by the diploma recipients are performed in the conservatory’s Bolshoy Hall. Among them are a Symphony in E flat by Sofia Gubaidulina (27).
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November 2, 1959: Four-and-a-half months after graduating from Moscow Conservatory, Sofia Gubaidulina (28) gives birth to a daughter, Nadia.
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December 15, 1962: Chaconne for piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (31) is performed for the first time, in Gnesin Hall, Moscow. The first half of the program is dedicated to her works.
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March 13, 1966: The Piano Sonata of Sofia Gubaidulina (34) is performed for the first time, by the composer in Moscow.
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February 25, 1967: Sofia Gubaidulina’s (35) Five Etudes for harp, double bass, and percussion is given its “official” premiere in Malyi Hall of the Moscow Conservatory.
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March 25, 1970: At the urging of her friend, the pianist Maria Venianimovna Yudina, Sofia Gubaidulina (38) is baptized into the Russian Orthodox Church in the Church of the Prophet Elijah, Moscow.
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April 4, 1971: Concordanza for chamber ensemble by Sofia Gubaidulina (39) is performed for the first time, in Royan.
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May 13, 1971: Night in Memphis, a cantata for mezzo-soprano, male chorus, and chamber orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (39) to an ancient Egyptian text (tr. Akhmatova and Potapova), is performed for the first time, in Zagreb.
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November 23, 1971: Fairy-Tale Poem for orchestra by Sofiya Gubaidulina (40) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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April 5, 1972: Music for harpsichord and percussion from the Collection of Mark Pekarski by Sofia Gubaidulina (40) is performed for the first time, in the October Concert Hall, Leningrad.
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September 19, 1972: A program of music by contemporary Soviet composers during the Warsaw Autumn Music festival is scheduled to include compositions by Sofia Gubaidulina (40), Vitaly Geviksman, Edison Denisov, and Roman Ledenyov. Through the intervention of Tikhon Khrennikov, General Secretary of the Soviet Composers Union, none of their music is played on the final program.
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March 1, 1973: Roses, a cycle for soprano and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (41) to words of Aigi, is performed for the first time, at the Moscow Youth Musical Club in an evening dedicated to her and her music.
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May 5, 1973: Detto II for cello and chamber ensemble by Sofia Gubaidulina (41) is performed for the first time, in Malyi Hall of Moscow Conservatory.
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January 15, 1974: Abzählreime, a song cycle for voice and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (42) to words of Satunovsky, is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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November 22, 1974: Quattro for two trumpets and two trombones by Sofia Gubaidulina (43) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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April 16, 1975: Rumore e silenzio for harpsichord, celesta, and percussion by Sofia Gubaidulina (43) is performed for the first time, in Leningrad.
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March 28, 1976: Sofia Gubaidulina (44) appears on stage in the Concert Hall of the House of Scientists in Moscow, along with Vyacheslav Petrovich Artyomov and Viktor Yevseyevich Suslin in a group which will one day have the name Astraea. They improvise on traditional instruments.
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May 6, 1976: Concerto for bassoon and low strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (44) is performed for the first time, in the Hall of the Union of Soviet Composers, Moscow.
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December 24, 1976: Rubáiyát, a canata for solo voice and chamber orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (45) to words of medieval Persian poets (tr. Derzhavin), is performed for the first time, in Moscow. Up to the opening down beat, no one is sure if the authorities will let it be heard.
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February 22, 1977: Dots, Lines, and Zigzag for bass clarinet and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (45) is performed for the first time, in the Information Center of the Czech Socialist Republic in East Berlin.
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April 5, 1977: Misterioso for seven percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (45) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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October 24, 1977: Astrea, a group including Sofia Gubaidulina and two others, which plays on traditional instruments, performs at the Moscow Jazz Club (on her 46th birthday). Afterwards, they are driven home by a man unknown to them who they assume is a KGB agent. He tells them to call him if they ever need anything like foreign currency or a way out of the country.
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December 12, 1977: Ten Etudes for cello by Sofia Gubaidulina (46) are performed for the first time, at the Moscow Composers Union.
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January 16, 1978: Concerto for symphony orchestra and jazz band with three sopranos and tape by Sofia Gubaidulina (46) to words of Fet is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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February 22, 1978: Introitus for piano and chamber orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (46) is performed for the first time, in the Hall of the Composers’ Union, Moscow along with premieres by three other composers. Every important “unofficial” composer in the USSR is in attendance.
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May 17, 1978: Duo Sonata for two bassoons by Sofia Gubaidulina (46) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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September 16, 1978: Te salutant for large pops orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (46) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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October 11, 1978: Quartet for four flutes by Sofia Gubaidulina (46) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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December 10, 1978: Bacchanal for soprano, saxophone quartet, bayan, and percussion by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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January 13, 1979: Jubilatio for four percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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March 24, 1979: String Quartet no.1 by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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March 27, 1979: In croce for cello and organ by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) is performed for the first time, in Kazan.
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May 21, 1979: Light and Dark for organ by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) is performed for the first time, in Leningrad.
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October 14, 1979: Detto I for organ and percussion by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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October 22, 1979: Hour of the Soul for percussion, mezzo-soprano, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) to words of Tsvyetayeva is performed for the first time, in Paris. See 26 May 1988.
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November 10, 1979: The Sixth All-Union Congress of the Composers Union meets in the Kremlin. Union head Tikhon Nikolayevich Khrennikov denounces the playing of “avant-garde” Soviet composers in the west under the guise of Soviet music. He mentions seven “non-conformists” by name. Among them is Sofia Gubaidulina (48). It will bring her into personal and professional disrepute.
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April 8, 1980: De profundis for bayan by Sofia Gubaidulina (48) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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February 9, 1981: Garden of Joy and Sorrow for flute, harp, and viola with speaker ad lib by Sofia Gubaidulina (49) to words of Tanzer is performed for the first time, in the Hall of the Composers Union, Moscow.
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April 30, 1981: Descensio for three trombones, three percussionists, harp, piano, and celesta by Sofia Gubaidulina (49) is performed for the first time, at Centre Pompidou, Paris.
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May 17, 1981: Pantomime for double bass and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (49) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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May 30, 1981: Offertorium for violin and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (49) is performed for the first time, in Vienna. See 24 September 1982 and 2 November 1986.
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February 1, 1982: Perception, five miniatures for baritone and seven strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (50) to words of Tanzer and the Bible, is performed for the first time, in the Hall of the Composers Union, Moscow. See 11 July 1986.
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April 15, 1982: The three most important composers of the Soviet avant-garde are heard together for the first time in a major Moscow venue. Performed are Offertorium for violin and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (50), Painting by Edison Denisov, and a suite from the incidental music to Dead Souls by Alfred Schnittke (47). It takes place in the Bolshoy Hall of the Moscow Conservatory.
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April 16, 1982: March for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (50), Alfred Schnittke (47), and Edison Denisov is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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September 24, 1982: A revision of Offertorium for violin and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (50) is performed for the first time, in West Berlin. See 30 May 1981 and 2 November 1986.
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October 18, 1982: On a visit to Moscow, five West German composers have a “secret” meeting with seven Soviet composers in the apartment of Edison Denisov. Among the seven are Sofia Gubaidulina (50) and Alfred Schnittke (47). During a long night, the twelve are able to make deep personal and lasting connections.
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October 20, 1982: The Seven Words for cello, bayan, and strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (50) is performed for the first time, in Malyi Hall of Moscow Conservatory. It is programmed under the title Partita after the Soviet censor refuses to allow the Christian nature of the title. It is not well received.
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January 16, 1985: Quasi hoquetus for viola, bassoon, and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (53) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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July 11, 1986: A second version of Perception by Sofia Gubaidulina (54) to words of Tanzer and the Bible is performed for the first time, in Lockenhaus, Austria. See 1 February 1982.
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September 4, 1986: Stimmen...Verstummen..., a symphony in 12 movements by Sofia Gubaidulina (54) is performed for the first time, in West Berlin. Luigi Nono (62) is present and is moved to meet the composer backstage and hold her hands, without comment.
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November 2, 1986: A second revision of Offertorium for violin and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (49) is performed for the first time, in London. See 30 May 1981 and 24 September 1982.
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March 25, 1987: Two works for soprano and eight players by Sofia Gubaidulina (55) is performed for the first time, in Cologne: Hommage à T.S. Eliot and Ein Walzerspass nach Johann Strauss .
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July 23, 1987: String Quartet no.2 by Sofia Gubaidulina (55) is performed for the first time, in Kuhmo, Finland.
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August 22, 1987: String Quartet no.3 by Sofia Gubaidulina (55) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh.
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September 19, 1987: Sofia Gubaidulina (55) departs Moscow for her first visit to the United States.
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November 29, 1987: Et exspecto for bayan by Sofia Gubaidulina (56) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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May 22, 1988: Through the efforts of Laurel Fay, John Cage (75) and Sofia Gubaidulina (56) meet in Leningrad. Although he is unable to hear her music on this trip, Cage will compose Two2 based on his conversation with Gubaidulina.
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May 26, 1988: A revised version of Hour of the Soul for percussion, mezzo-soprano, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (47) to words of Tsvyetayeva is performed for the first time, in Leningrad. See 22 October 1979.
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June 22, 1988: Two Songs on German Folk Poems for mezzo-soprano, flute, harpsichord and cello by Sofia Gubaidulina (56) are performed for the first time, in Heidelberg.
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January 4, 1989: Answer without a Question for three orchestras by Sofia Gubaidulina (57) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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March 4, 1989: Trio for violin, viola, and cello by Sofia Gubaidulina (57) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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June 22, 1989: Steps for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (57) is performed for the first time in its revised version, in Bad Kissingen. See 19 December 1990 and 25 March 1993.
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November 3, 1989: Pro et contra for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (58) is performed for the first time, in Louisville.
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November 27, 1989: Hommage à Marina Tsvetayeva for chorus by Sofia Gubaidulina (58) is performed for the first time, in Stockholm.
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June 8, 1990: Rejoice before God for chorus and organ by Sofia Gubaidulina (58) to words of the Psalms is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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September 11, 1990: Alleluia for chorus, boy soprano, organ, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (58) to words from the Russian Orthodox liturgy, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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December 19, 1990: The original version of Steps for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (59) is performed for the first time, in Berlin. See 22 June 1989.
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February 23, 1991: Do you Hear us Luigi? for six percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (59) is performed for the first time, in Moscow. It is in honor of Luigi Nono (†0).
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March 11, 1991: Sofia Gubaidulina (59) returns to Germany from Canada and takes up residence at the Worpswede artist colony. She will live here for over three months and compose Aus dem Stundenbuch inspired by Buch vom mönchischen Leben by Rainer Maria Rilke.
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August 27, 1991: Aus dem Stundenbuch for cello and orchestra, male chorus, and female speaker by Sofia Gubaidulina (59) to words of Rilke is performed for the first time, in Helsinki.
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September 18, 1991: Straight and Crooked for seven percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (59) is performed for the first time, in Turin the composer playing harpsichord and celesta.
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September 30, 1991: Sofia Gubaidulina (59) returns to Germany from Italy where she has been given a stipend and nine months residence at the Schreyahn artists’ colony in the Wendland.
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November 16, 1991: Silenzio for bayan, violin, and cello by Sofia Gubaidulina (60) is performed for the first time, in Hannover.
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December 18, 1991: Sofia Gubaidulina (60) is awarded the Premio Franco Abbiati in Varese, Italy.
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December 27, 1991: Sonata for two percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (60) is performed for the first time, in Moscow 25 years after it was composed.
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December 27, 1991: Lauda for vocal soloists, speaker, chorus, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina is performed for the first time, in Genoa.
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July 25, 1992: Tatar Dance for bayan and two double basses by Sofia Gubaidulina (60) is performed for the first time, in Hitzacker, Germany.
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March 25, 1993: The third version of Steps for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (61) is performed for the first time, in Stockholm. See 22 June 1989 and 19 December 1990.
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June 12, 1993: Now always Snow for chamber chorus and chamber ensemble by Sofia Gubaidulina (61) to words of Aigi is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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September 3, 1993: Laudatio pacis, an oratorio for vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra (without strings) by Sofia Gubaidulina (61), Marek Kopelent, and Paul-Heinz Dittrich to words of Amos Comenius, is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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September 30, 1993: Meditation on the Bach Chorale Vor Deinen Thron tret ich Hiermit for harpsichord and string quintet by Sofia Gubaidulina (61) is performed for the first time, in Bremen.
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January 20, 1994: String Quartet no.4 with tape by Sofia Gubaidulina (62) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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February 1, 1994: And: The Feast is in Full Progress for cello and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (62) is performed for the first time, in Las Palmas, Grand Canary.
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February 12, 1994: In Erwartung for saxophone quartet and six percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (62) is performed for the first time, in Stockholm.
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February 24, 1994: Dancer on a Tightrope for violin and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (62) is performed for the first time, at the Library of Congress, Washington. Since 20 January, the composer has been present at four premieres of her work, in New York, the Canary Islands, Stockholm, and Washington.
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May 28, 1994: “An Angel...” for mezzo-soprano and double bass by Sofia Gubaidulina (62) to words of Lasker-Schüler is performed for the first time, in Berlin.
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June 4, 1994: ...early in the morning before waking... for seven kotos by Sofia Gubaidulina (62) is performed for the first time, in Tokyo.
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November 29, 1994: Figures of Time for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (63) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Birmingham.
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February 18, 1995: Music for flute, strings, and percussion by Sofia Gubaidulina (63) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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July 6, 1995: Two Etudes for double bass by Sofia Gubaidulina (63) are performed for the first time, in Lockenhaus, Austria.
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April 11, 1996: Quaternion for four cellos by Sofia Gubaidulina (64) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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November 25, 1996: Galgenlieder à 3, a cycle for mezzo-soprano, double bass, and percussion by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) to words of Morgenstern, is performed for the first time, in Huddersfield.
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December 8, 1996: Motives from Tatar Folklore for domra and piano by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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January 16, 1997: Impromptu for flute, violin and strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) is performed for the first time, in the Cologne Philharmonie.
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April 17, 1997: Concerto for viola and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) is performed for the first time, in Chicago.
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May 23, 1997: Galgenlieder à 5, a cycle for mezzo-soprano, flute, percussion, bayan, and double bass by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) to words of Morgenstern, is performed for the first time, in Hannover.
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July 6, 1997: Aus den Visionen der Hildegard von Bingen for alto by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) is performed for the first time, in Ludwigsburg.
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September 27, 1997: Ritorno Perpetuo for harpsichord by Sofia Gubaidulina (65) is performed for the first time, in Warsaw.
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February 9, 1998: Sonnengesang for cello, chamber chorus, and percussion by Sofia Gubaidulina (66) to words of St. Francis of Assisi is performed for the first time, in Frankfurt-am-Main.
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October 31, 1998: Sofia Gubaidulina (67) is awarded the Praemium Imperiale in ceremonies in Suntory Hall, Tokyo.
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April 14, 1999: In the Shadow of the Tree for koto, bass koto, cheng, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (67) is performed for the first time, in Tokyo.
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April 29, 1999: Two Paths for two violas and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (67) is performed for the first time, in Avery Fisher Hall, New York.
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May 6, 1999: Sofia Gubaidulina (67) is awarded the Léonie Sonning Music Prize.
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October 24, 1999: On her 68th birthday, Sofia Gubaidulina is awarded the Preis der Stiftung Bibel und Kultur by German President Johannes Rau.
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September 1, 2000: St. John Passion for vocal soloists, choruses, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (68) to words from St. John the Evangelist and the Apocalypse is performed for the first time, in Stuttgart. It is a great success, the audience applauding for 20 minutes.
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November 9, 2000: A weeklong annual festival by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra begins today in Stockholm, this year honoring the music of Sofia Gubaidulina (69).
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March 22, 2001: Sofia Gubaidulina (69) is awarded the Goethe Medal in Weimar.
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April 18, 2001: Risonanza for two trumpets, four trombones, organ, and six strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (69) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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October 22, 2001: As part of the International Festival Sofia Gubaidulina during her 70th birthday year, her family home in Kazan officially becomes the Sofia Gubaidulina Center for Contemporary Music.
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March 16, 2002: St. John Easter for solo voices, two choruses, organ and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (70) is performed for the first time, in Hamburg.
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May 10, 2002: Mirage: the Dancing Sun for eight cellos by Sofia Gubaidulina (70) is performed for the first time, in Beauvais.
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May 27, 2002: Sofia Gubaidulina (70) is awarded the Polar Music Prize by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden in Stockholm.
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August 17, 2002: German citizen Sofia Gubaidulina (70) is awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany in Kiel.
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September 15, 2002: The Rider on the White Horse for orchestra and organ by Sofia Gubaidulina (70) is performed for the first time, in Rotterdam.
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October 2, 2002: Reflections on the Theme BACH for string quartet by Sofia Gubaidulina (70) is performed for the first time, at Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire.
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January 11, 2003: Passionen eines Lebens, a film about Sofia Gubaidulina (71), is shown for the first time, over ZDF/ARTE television in Germany.
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February 28, 2003: On the Edge of Abyss for seven cellos and two waterphones by Sofia Gubaidulina (71) is performed for the first time, in Moscow.
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April 17, 2003: The Light of the End for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (71) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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October 10, 2003: Under the Sign of Scorpio for bayan and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (71) is performed for the first time, in Stockholm.
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March 14, 2004: Verwandlung for trombone, saxophone quartet, cello, double bass, and tam-tam by Sofia Gubaidulina (72) is performed for the first time, in Turku, Finland.
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March 19, 2004: The American Academy of Arts and Letters inducts Sofia Gubaidulina (72) as a Foreign Honorary Member.
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September 11, 2004: Hour of the Soul for voice and wind orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (72) to words of Tsvetayeva is performed for the first time, in Bolzano, Italy, 30 years after it was composed.
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May 26, 2005: The Deceitful Face of Hope and Despair for flute and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (73) is performed for the first time.
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February 15, 2006: Feast During a Plague for orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (74) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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June 11, 2006: The Lyre of Orpheus for violin, percussion, and strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (74) is performed for the first time, in Basel.
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January 12, 2007: The Triptych Nadeyka by Sofia Gubaidulina (75), consisting of The Lyre of Orpheus for violin, percussion, and strings, The Deceitful Face of Hope and Despair for flute and orchestra, and Feast During a Plague for orchestra, is performed completely for the first time, in Barbican Hall, London.
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September 18, 2008: Glorious Percussion, a concerto for percussion ensemble and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (76), is performed for the first time, in Gothenburg.
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June 21, 2009: Sofia Gubaidulina (77) is awarded the European Church Music Prize in Schwäbisch Gmünd.
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November 14, 2009: Fachwerk for percussion and strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (78) is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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June 30, 2010: Sotto voce for viola, double bass, and two guitars by Sofia Gubaidulina (78) is performed for the first time, in Passau.
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August 30, 2011: Labyrinth for twelve cellos by Sofia Gubaidulina (79) is performed for the first time, in Lucerne.
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July 22, 2014: Why? for flute, clarinet, and strings by Sofia Gubaidulina (82) is performed for the first time, in Forli.
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March 1, 2015: Pilgrims for violin, double bass, piano, and two percussionists by Sofia Gubaidulina (83) is performed for the first time, in Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts, Chicago.
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April 18, 2015: O Come, Holy Ghost for soprano, bass, and chorus by Sofia Gubaidulina (83) to medieval texts, is performed for the first time, in the Frauenkirche, Dresden.
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February 23, 2017: Triple Concerto for violin, cello, bayan, and orchestra by Sofia Gubaidulina (85) is performed for the first time, in Boston.