A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Jan Ladislav Dussek

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February 12, 1760: Václav Jan Dussik (Jan Ladislav Dussek) is born in Czaslau, Kingdom of Bohemia (Cáslav, Czech Republic), 70 km east of Prague, first of eight children born to Jan Joseph Dussik, schoolteacher, organist, and composer, and Veronika Stevetová a harpist and daughter of a judge.
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December 16, 1779: Jan Ladislav Dussek (19) appears in public for the first time as a pianist in Malines (Mechelen).
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July 12, 1782: Jan Ladislav Dussek (22) gives a concert in Hamburg where he meets Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (68).
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January 15, 1783: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (22) three keyboard concertos C.2-4 in The Hague and three keyboard sonatas C.5-7 in Berlin, is announced in Cramer’s Magazin der Musik.
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January 28, 1787: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (26) three piano sonatas C.27-29 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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April 6, 1787: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (27) three piano sonatas C.30-32 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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May 18, 1787: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (27) Piano Concerto C.33 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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July 7, 1787: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (27) three piano sonatas C.34-36 is announced in the Mercure de France, Paris.
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September 1, 1787: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (27) three piano sonatas C.37-39 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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March 25, 1788: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (28) keyboard sonata C.40 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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June 15, 1788: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (28) three piano sonatas C.41-43 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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October 27, 1788: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (28) Petits airs comus, variés pour le clavecin ou forte piano C.44-49 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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February 23, 1789: Jan Ladislav Dussek (29) makes his first appearance in England at the Professional Concert in Hanover Square in London.
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March 16, 1789: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (29) three keyboard sonatas C.50-52 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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June 1, 1789: Jan Ladislav Dussek (29) performs at Hanover Square Rooms, London, perhaps his first appearance in England.
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May 13, 1790: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (30) three keyboard sonatas C.64-66 is announced in the Journal de Paris.
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June 15, 1790: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (30) three piano sonatas C.67-69 are entered in Stationers’ Hall, London.
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February 17, 1791: Three piano sonatas C.71-73 by Jan Ladislav Dussek (31) are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 11, 1791: The first season of the Salomon-Haydn (58) concerts in London begins in the Hanover Square Rooms. It includes the first performance of Symphony no.96. The program also features Jan Ladislav Dussek (31) playing his own piano music. Haydn is escorted into the room “amid universal applause.”
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March 16, 1791: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (31) three keyboard soantas C.74-76 is announced in Sieber’s Affiches et Annonces.
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June 3, 1791: The last of the Haydn (59)-Salomon concerts for this season takes place in London. Salomon includes Jan Ladislav Dussek (31) performing a new piano concerto.
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November 23, 1791: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (31) Harp Concerto C.53 is announced in The Times of London.
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January 10, 1792: Trio Sonatas for piano or harpsichord with violin ad.lib. by Jan Ladislav Dussek (31) are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 9, 1792: At a Salomon concert in London, the Sinfonia Concertante I: 105 by Joseph Haydn (59) is performed for the first time. Also on the program is a new concerto for pedal harp by Jan Ladislav Dussek (32).
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April 25, 1792: Johann Peter Salomon gives a concert for the benefit of Jan Ladislav Dussek (32) in the Hanover Square Rooms, London.
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August 31, 1792: Jan Ladislav Dussek (32) marries Giustina Sophia Corri, singer, pianist, and harpist, the daughter of Domenico Corri, an Italian voice teacher, in St. Anne’s Church, London.
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February 27, 1793: Six Sonatinas for piano or harpsichord with flute by Jan Ladislav Dussek (33) are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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April 17, 1793: Johann Peter Salomon presents a performance in London featuring Jan Ladislav Dussek (33), his wife, and Muzio Clementi (41).
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October 16, 1793: Publication of two works by Jan Ladislav Dussek (33) is announced in The Times of London. They are the Sonata for piano, flute and cello C.94 and the Rondo for piano C.95.
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November 19, 1793: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (33) Sonata for piano C.96 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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December 13, 1793: Publication of three piano works by Jan Ladislav Dussek (33) is announced in The Times of London. They are the Piano Concerto C.97, Variations on Within a Mile of Edinburgh C.101 and The Sufferings of the Queen of France. A Musical Composition, Expressing the Feelings of the Unfortunate Marie Antoinette, During her Imprisonment, Trial, &c. C.98.
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May 5, 1794: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (34) duet for piano and harp C.102 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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May 23, 1794: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (34) Piano Sonata with violin accompaniment op.27 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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May 28, 1794: The first set of Original Canzonettas by Joseph Haydn (62), to words of Hunter, is published by Corri&Dussek (34) in London.
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December 16, 1794: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (34) Piano Concerto C.104 is announced in The Times of London.
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February 2, 1795: The Fourth season of the Salomon-Haydn concerts begins in King’s Theatre, London. Johann Peter Salomon has sold his operation to the Opera Concert Series. Joseph Haydn (62) now works for them. His Symphony no.102 is performed for the first time. This is one of the more glittering musical events of the decade. Music by Haydn, Jan Ladislav Dussek (34), who is also present, Domenico Cimarosa (45) and others is presented by many of the great performers of the day. At one point, several patrons leave their seats to get a better view of Haydn. Not long thereafter, a chandelier crashes to the floor where they had just been sitting. According to legend, the symphony playing at the time, Haydn’s no.96, is thereafter called “The Miracle.” Unfortunately, the accident happened during the premiere of the Symphony no.102.
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March 9, 1795: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (35) six piano sonatas C.118-123 are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 10, 1795: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (35) Variations on Fal Lal La for piano C.124 is announced in The Times of London.
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May 27, 1795: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (35) Piano Concerto C.125 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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August 20, 1795: The second set of Original Canzonettas by Joseph Haydn (63) is published by Corri&Dussek (35) in London.
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September 5, 1795: Publication of several works by Jan Ladislav Dussek (35) is announced in The Times of London: three piano sonatas C.126-8, the Pedal Harp Concerto C.129 and two rondos for piano C.130-1.
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June 8, 1796: An advertisement in The Morning Post and Fashionable World informs the London public that Corri, Dussek (36), and Co. have opened a new warehouse in Haymarket for “Musical Publications, Piano Fortes, and other Instruments.” (Illiano, 90)
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June 29, 1796: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (36) two rondos C.139-140 is announced in The Times of London.
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July 1, 1796: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (36) three keyboard sonatas C.141-3 are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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July 12, 1796: Ignace Pleyel (39) advertises in the London and Edinburgh Gazettes that he has entered into a publishing relationship with Corri and Dussek (36).
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November 1, 1796: Instructions on the Art of Playing the Piano Forte or Harpsichord by Jan Ladislav Dussek (36) and Ignaz Pleyel (39) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London. Also entered is Pleyel’s Six Progressive Sonatinas with violin accompaniment B.574-579.
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December 12, 1796: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (36) Overture for piano-four hands C.144 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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January 1, 1797: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (36) piano piece La Chasse C.146 is announced in the Music Journal, London.
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January 2, 1797: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (36) two harp sonatas C.147-8 are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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February 11, 1797: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s three piano sonatas C.149-151 are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London on the eve of the composer’s 37th birthday.
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October 28, 1797: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (37) Piano Sonata C.152 is announced in The Times of London. The work is entitled “The Naval Battle and Total Defeat of the Grand Dutch Fleet by Admiral Duncan on the 11. of October 1797.”
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November 1, 1797: “The Naval Battle and Total Defeat of the Grand Dutch Fleet by Admiral Duncan on the 11. of October 1797” for piano by Jan Ladislav Dussek (37) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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February 23, 1798: Piano Concerto C.153 by Jan Ladislav Dussek (38) is performed for the first time, in London by the composer.
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April 24, 1798: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (38) Piano Sonata C.154 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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November 14, 1798: The Captive of Spilberg, a musical drama by Jan Ladislav Dussek (38) to words of Prince Hoare, is performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London. Reaction to the music is good, to the libretto, mixed.
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January 19, 1799: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (38) six harp sonatinas C.160-5 are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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January 19, 1799: An overture to Kelly’s play Feudal Times by Jan Ladislav Dussek (38) is performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London.
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March 1, 1799: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (39) three piano sonatas C.166-8 are entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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April 8, 1799: The publication of two works by Jan Ladislav Dussek (39) is announced in The Times, London: Piano Sonata C.169 and Harp and Piano Duet C.170.
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April 25, 1799: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (39) Piano Quintet op.41 C.172 is performed at the debut of the composer’s sister, Veronika Cianchettini, in King’s Theatre, London.
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May 24, 1799: An Overture and Characteristic Pieces for Kelly’s play Pizarro by Jan Ladislav Dussek (39) are performed for the first time, in Drury Lane Theatre, London.
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June 3, 1799: Jan Ladislav Dussek (39) appears at a benefit concert for Domenico Dragonetti, his last recorded appearance in London.
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November 4, 1799: His firm already in trouble, Jan Ladislav Dussek (39) signs a publishing contract with Longman, Clementi (47) & Co in London.
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December 31, 1799: A Duet for harp and piano by Jan Ladislav Dussek (39) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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February 22, 1800: Lorenzo da Ponte, partner in a publishing firm with Jan Ladislav Dussek (40) and Domenico Corri, goes bankrupt in London.
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February 24, 1800: Jan Ladislav Dussek (40) makes his first performance on the continent since fleeing his English creditors last autumn, at Eimbeck House, Hamburg.
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April 8, 1800: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (40) piano sonatas C.177-8 is announced in the Morning Post, London.
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April 15, 1800: Domenico Corri, father-in-law to Jan Ladislav Dussek (40) and partner with Dussek and Lorenzo da Ponte in a publishing firm, goes bankrupt. Dussek already fled England in 1799 to escape his creditors. There is no evidence that he will ever see his wife or daughter again.
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November 15, 1800: A Certificate of Bankruptcy is issued for Domenico Corri, business partner of Jan Ladislav Dussek (40). Dussek is presently on the continent.
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December 19, 1800: A letter is sent from the Alien Office in London to authorities in Yarmouth and Gravesend that should one John Lewis Duseck (Jan Ladislav Dussek (40)) appear, he is to be detained and any papers he carries confiscated.
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August 27, 1801: Domenico Corri advertises in The Morning Post and Gazetteer of London that his partnership with Jan Ladislav Dussek (41) being dissolved, and having gone through bankruptcy, he has bought the assets of Corri & Dussek and is open for business.
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October 29, 1801: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (41) two piano sonatas C.184-5 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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December 1, 1801: Muzio Clementi (49) reports that he has received the right to print music composed by Jan Ladislav Dussek (41) in England.
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May 5, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) makes the acquaintance of Ludwig Spohr (18) in Hamburg, at a dinner at the home of Herr Kiekhöver.
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August 15, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) returns to his home town of Cáslav, Bohemia for the first time, to visit his parents.
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September 14, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) gives a concert with horn player Giovanni Punto in Cáslav. It will be repeated tomorrow.
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November 18, 1802: Jan Ladislav Dussek (42) makes his first performance in Leipzig.
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July 27, 1803: Concerto for piano C.187 by Jan Ladislav Dussek (43) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 18, 1804: Jan Ladislav Dussek (44) performs in the concert hall of the Nationaltheater, Berlin.
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June 25, 1804: Fantasia and Fugue for piano C.199 by Jan Ladislav Dussek (44) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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September 3, 1804: Six Canzonets C.200-205 for voice and piano by Jan Ladislav Dussek (44) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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September 26, 1804: The Gazette Nationale reports that Jan Ladislav Dussek (44) is named Kapellmeister to Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Prussia in Magdeburg, a passionate amateur pianist and composer.
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October 1, 1806: Jan Ladislav Dussek (46) writes to his publishers, Breitkopf and Härtel, that he is leaving for war, accompanying his employer and friend, Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Prussia.
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October 9, 1806: At the home of Prince Ludwig Friedrich II of Schwarzburg-Rudolstadt, Jan Ladislav Dussek (46) performs his Concerto for two pianos and orchestra op.63 C.206 for the first time, possibly with string quartet.
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October 10, 1806: War of the Fourth Coalition: French forces defeat the Prussians at Saalfeld, 40 km southeast of Erfurt. Prince Ludwig Ferdinand of Prussia is killed in action. He was accompanied into battle by his friend and employee, Jan Ladislav Dussek (46). After the death of Prince Ludwig, Prussian and Saxon troops flee before the French. Dussek will later pen the Elégie harmonique sur la mort du Prince Louis Ferdinand de Prusse, honoring the memory of his good friend.
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September 2, 1807: This day marks the first mention of Jan Ladislav Dussek (47) in the service of Charles Maurice de Talleyrand.
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February 23, 1808: Count Remusat writes to the director of the Opéra requesting that the name of Jan Ladislav Dussek (48) be inscribed on the “liste des Entrées.” This means that Dussek will not have to pay to be admitted.
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May 15, 1808: Talleyrand leaves Paris for his chateau at Valençay. Napoléon has given him the task of imprisoning/entertaining the three Spanish princes captured at Bayonne (the Prince of the Asturias, the Infante Don Carlos and the Infante Don Antonio). Jan Ladislav Dussek (48) is part of the entertainment. Here, during the upcoming summer, Dussek will invent the Aeolian Harp.
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December 22, 1808: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (48) Notturno Concertante op.68 C.233 is performed in Paris by the composer, possibly for the first time.
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July 26, 1809: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (49) Three Trio Sonatas for piano four-hands C.230-232 and Notturno for piano and violin C.233 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 9, 1810: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (50) Three Duos concertantes for piano and harp C.234 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 22, 1810: Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (50) three sets of variations for piano C.235-237 are performed for the first time, in the Théâtre de l'Odéon, Paris by the composer.
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April 18, 1810: Publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (50) Piano concerto C.238 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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February 13, 1811: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (51) Three Piano Sonatas C.240-242 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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February 22, 1811: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (51) Three Duos concertantes C.243 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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January 13, 1812: The publication of Jan Ladislav Dussek’s (51) Two Duos for piano and harp C.257-258 is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 20, 1812: Jan Ladislav Dussek dies of gout at St. Germain-en-Laye, Seine-et-Oise, in the French Empire, aged 52 years, one month and eight days. The place of burial is not now known.
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December 8, 1813: A benefit for wounded Austrian and Bavarian soldiers at the University of Vienna features the first performance of two works by Ludwig van Beethoven (42): the Symphony no.7 and Wellington’s Victory. The works cause ecstatic applause and critical raves. The concert is so successful it will be repeated 12 December. Wellingtons’s Victory is directed by Beethoven with the assistance of Ignaz Moscheles, and Antonio Salieri (63). The violins include Louis Spohr (29), Ignaz Schuppanzigh, and Joseph Mayseder. Playing bass drum are Meyer Beer (Giacomo Meyerbeer) (22) and Johann Nepomuk Hummel (35). Besides the Beethoven works, the concerts also include two marches, one by Jan Ladislav Dussek (†0), one by Ignace Joseph Pleyel (56), performed by Mälzel’s Mechanical Trumpeter with orchestral accompaniment.