A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

David Diamond

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July 9, 1915: David Leo Diamond is born in Rochester, New York, USA, the second of three children born to Osias Diamond, a cabinetmaker and Anna Schildhaus, a dressmaker. The parents are Jewish immigrants from Austria.
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April 10, 1934: Hommage à Satie for chamber orchestra by David Diamond (18) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 15, 1935: Eight Piano Pieces for Children by David Diamond (19) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York.
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November 10, 1935: Formal Dance for piano and trumpet by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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January 26, 1936: The Piano Concerto of Marc Blitzstein (30) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of WEVD, New York. Norman Cazden plays the solo part. The composer plays a piano reduction of the orchestral parts, with David Diamond (20) turning pages. See 27 January 1936.
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February 26, 1936: Divertimento for piano and small orchestra by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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March 2, 1936: Ballade for orchestra by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 22, 1936: Dance of Liberation for piano by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 29, 1936: Partita for oboe, bassoon, and piano by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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May 19, 1936: Sonata for cello and piano by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in Princeton, New Jersey.
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June 23, 1936: A Sinfonietta for orchestra by David Diamond (20) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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November 26, 1936: Roger Sessions (39) marries his second wife, Sara Elizabeth (Lisl) Franck, a former student, in Hadley, Massachusetts. One of the witnesses is a student of Sessions, David Diamond (21).
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December 10, 1936: Psalm for orchestra by David Diamond (21) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York conducted by Howard Hanson (40).
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March 24, 1937: Concerto for violin and orchestra no.1 by David Diamond (21) is performed for the first time, in New York, conducted by the composer. Also premiered is Diamond’s Sonata in a minor for piano. This concert is a production of the New York City Composers’ Forum Laboratory of the Federal Music Project.
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May 7, 1937: Chamber Symphony for clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, viola, and piano by David Diamond (21) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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January 23, 1938: Icaro, a ballet by David Diamond (22) to a scenario after de Bosis, is performed for the first time, in Kauffman Auditorium, New York.
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March 8, 1938: Quintet for flute, violin, viola, cello, and piano by David Diamond (22) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 3, 1938: The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowships are announced, including ones for William Grant Still (42), David Diamond (22), and Carlos Chávez (38).
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April 28, 1938: Festival Fanfare for brass and percussion by Howard Hanson (41) is performed for the first time, in Eastman Theatre, Rochester, New York the composer conducting. Hanson also conducts the premiere of Elegy in Memory of Maurice Ravel for brass, harps, and percussion by David Diamond (22).
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May 23, 1938: Trio for violin, viola, and cello by David Diamond (22) is performed for the first time, at the Library of Congress, Washington.
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July 29, 1938: Heroic Piece for chamber orchestra by David Diamond (23) is performed for the first time, in Zürich.
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August 12, 1938: Overture no.1 for orchestra by David Diamond (23) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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December 29, 1938: Concerto for string quartet by David Diamond (23) is performed for the first time, in the Library of Congress, Washington.
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November 6, 1939: Elegy in Memory of Maurice Ravel by David Diamond (24) in the version for string orchestra and percussion is performed for the first time, in New York. See 28 April 1938.
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April 23, 1940: Variations on an Original Theme for chamber orchestra by David Diamond (24) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York.
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May 24, 1940: Concert Piece for orchestra by David Diamond (24) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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September 7, 1940: Concerto for small orchestra by David Diamond (25) is performed for the first time, in Saratoga, New York.
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March 18, 1941: Aria and Hymn for orchestra by David Diamond (25) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 23, 1941: The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowships are announced, including ones for David Diamond (25) and Marc Blitzstein (36).
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December 21, 1941: Symphony no.1 by David Diamond (26) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 30, 1942: Concerto for cello and orchestra by David Diamond (26) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York conducted by Howard Hanson (45).
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October 14, 1942: Incidental music to the radio play The Man Behind the Gun by David Diamond (27) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the CBS radio network.
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January 17, 1943: Concerto for two pianos by David Diamond (27) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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March 10, 1944: Ma-Tovu for tenor, chorus, and organ by David Diamond (28) is performed for the first time, in Park Avenue Synagogue, New York.
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October 13, 1944: Symphony no.2 by David Diamond (29) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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November 24, 1944: Rounds for string orchestra by David Diamond (29) is performed for the first time, in Minneapolis.
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January 25, 1945: Incidental music to Shakespeare’s play The Tempest by David Diamond (29) is performed for the first time, in the Alvin Theatre, New York.
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April 5, 1946: Labyrinth, a ballet by David Diamond (30) to a story by Marchowsky, is performed for the first time, in Times Hall, New York.
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March 16, 1947: Two works for voice and piano by Elliott Carter (38) are performed for the first time, in the Museum of Modern Art, New York: Voyage, to words of Crane, and Warble for Lilac-Time to words of Whitman. Also premiered is String Quartet no.3 by David Diamond (31). See 14 September 1946 and 8 August 1974.
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October 20, 1947: Music for Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet for orchestra by David Diamond (32) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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October 21, 1947: Canticle for violin and piano by David Diamond (32) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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January 23, 1948: Symphony no.4 by David Diamond (32) is performed for the first time, in Boston Leonard Bernstein (29) conducting.
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February 28, 1948: A farewell concert in honor of Hanns Eisler (49) is presented in Town Hall, New York. Among those sponsoring the event are Walter Piston (54), Roger Sessions (51), Roy Harris (50), Aaron Copland (47), David Diamond (32), Leonard Bernstein (29), and Randall Thompson. Eisler will be deported next month.
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February 29, 1948: Violin Concerto no.2 by David Diamond (32) is performed for the first time, in Vancouver.
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April 23, 1948: Dreams that Money Can Buy, a film with music by Darius Milhaud (55), John Cage (35) and David Diamond (33), is released in the United States. It was shown at the Venice Film Festival last September.
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May 7, 1948: Longing for Jerusalem for tenor, chorus, and organ by David Diamond (32) to words of Jehuda Ha-Levi is performed for the first time, in the Park Avenue Synagogue, New York.
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December 8, 1948: Piano Sonata no.1 by David Diamond (33) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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October 20, 1949: Chaconne for violin and piano by David Diamond (34) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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November 3, 1949: Overture to The Tempest by David Diamond (34) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 19, 1949: The Enormous Room, a symphonic poem by David Diamond (34), is performed for the first time, in Cincinnati.
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February 1, 1950: Timon of Athens, a symphonic poem by David Diamond (34), is performed for the first time, in Louisville.
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November 3, 1950: Symphony no.3 by David Diamond (35) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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December 10, 1950: Ceremonial Fanfare for orchestra by David Diamond (35) is performed for the first time, in the Metropolitan Opera House, New York.
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February 3, 1951: Incidental music to Williams’ play The Rose Tattoo by David Diamond (35) is performed in New York for the first time, in the Martin Beck Theatre.
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May 25, 1951: Mizmor L’David for tenor, chorus, and organ by David Diamond (35) is performed for the first time, in Park Avenue Synagogue, New York.
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March 10, 1952: Quintet for clarinet, two violas, and two cellos by David Diamond (36) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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June 29, 1953: Trio for violin, cello, and piano by David Diamond (37) is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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November 17, 1954: Ahavah, a symphonic eulogy for narrator and orchestra by David Diamond (39), is performed for the first time, in Washington.
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March 7, 1957: Sinfonia Concertante for orchestra by David Diamond (41) is performed for the first time, in Rochester, New York.
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March 8, 1957: Symphony no.6 by David Diamond (41) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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October 1, 1957: String Quartet no.4 by David Diamond (42) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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February 15, 1958: David Diamond’s (42) symphonic suite The World of Paul Klee is performed for the first time, in Portland, Oregon.
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July 14, 1958: Woodwind Quintet by David Diamond (43) is performed for the first time, at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts.
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November 9, 1960: Marc Blitzstein (55), David Diamond (45), and a friend drive from Florence to Rome where Blitzstein will work on his opera Sacco and Vanzetti.
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February 10, 1961: String Quartet no.5 by David Diamond (45) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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October 26, 1961: Symphony no.8 by David Diamond (46) is performed for the first time, in New York Leonard Bernstein (43) conducting.
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January 26, 1962: Symphony no.7 by David Diamond (46) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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May 4, 1962: Night Music for accordion and string quartet by David Diamond (46) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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September 23, 1963: Elegies for Faulkner and cummings for flute, english horn, and strings by David Diamond (48) is performed for the first time, in Philadelphia.
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November 17, 1963: This Sacred Ground for male voice, chorus, and orchestra by David Diamond (48) to words of Lincoln, is performed for the first time, in Buffalo.
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December 5, 1963: String Quartet no.6 by David Diamond (48) is performed for the first time, in Buffalo.
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February 21, 1964: Sonatina for accordion by David Diamond (48) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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July 26, 1965: Nonet for strings by David Diamond (50) is performed for the first time, in Philharmonic Hall, New York.
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November 18, 1965: String Quartet no.8 by David Diamond (50) is performed for the first time, in Kansas City, Kansas.
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December 5, 1965: The Golden Slippers, a musical folk play by David Diamond (50) to words of Citron after Pérez Galdós, is performed for the first time, in Joan of Arc Playhouse, New York.
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April 28, 1966: Two works for orchestra by David Diamond (50) are performed for the first time, in New York, Leonard Bernstein (47) conducting: Symphony no.5 and Concerto for Piano and Orchestra.
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May 25, 1966: Ralph Shapey (45) wins a composing award from the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Harry Partch (64) receives the Marjorie Peabody Award. Stefan Wolpe (63) and David Diamond (50) are inducted as members of the National Institute of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Pierre Boulez (41) is inducted as an honorary member.
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October 29, 1966: String Quartet no.10 by David Diamond (51) is performed for the first time, at American University, Washington.
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November 19, 1966: String Quartet no.7 by David Diamond (51) is performed for the first time, in the Library of Congress, Washington.
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February 4, 1969: David Diamond (53) writes to the American Academy, “In 1942 I received the Prix de Rome, which was a cash award of $1,000 with a provision that once the Second World War was over, my regular residence as a Fellow of the Academy would be fulfilled. This has never happened.” (Brody, 37) Diamond will be made a resident for 1971-1972.
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January 31, 1970: To Music, a choral symphony by David Diamond (54) to words of Masefield, is performed for the first time, at the Manhattan School of Music conducted by the composer.
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March 14, 1971: Overture no.2 “A Buoyant Music” for orchestra by David Diamond (55) is performed for the first time, in Washington.
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November 13, 1972: Quintet for piano and strings by David Diamond (57) is performed for the first time.
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May 20, 1975: Two works by David Diamond (59) are performed for the first time, in celebration of the 60th year of the composer: Hebrew Melodies, a cycle for voice and piano by words of Byron, and Sonata for solo cello.
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April 1, 1976: Concerto for violin and orchestra no.3 by David Diamond (60) is performed for the first time, in New York, conducted by Leonard Bernstein (57).
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February 3, 1977: A Secular Cantata for vocal soloists, chorus, and chamber orchestra by David Diamond (61) to words of Agee is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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July 6, 1980: Concertino for piano and orchestra by David Diamond (64) is performed for the first time, in Washington in honor of the 65th year of the composer.
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December 11, 1981: Sonata for violin and piano no.2 by David Diamond (66) is performed for the first time, in the Library of Congress, Washington.
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November 30, 1983: Prelude, Fantasy and Fugue for piano by David Diamond (68) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 17, 1985: Symphony no.9 by David Diamond (70) is performed for the first time, in New York, Leonard Bernstein (67) conducting.
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February 18, 1986: Concerto for flute and orchestra by David Diamond (70) is performed for the first time, in New Haven, Connecticut.
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October 24, 1986: Five Japanese Songs for voice and piano by David Diamond (71) is performed for the first time, in New York.
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June 11, 1987: A Cantata for Hope for vocal soloists, chorus, and chamber orchestra by David Diamond (71) to words of Wiesel, is performed for the first time, at the 92nd Street YMCA, New York.
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July 1, 2000: Symphony no.10 by David Diamond (84) is performed for the first time, in Seattle.
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June 13, 2005: David Leo Diamond dies at the Wolk Manor of the Rochester Jewish Home in Rochester, New York, USA, of congestive heart failure, aged 89 years, eleven months, and four days. His mortal remains will be cremated.