A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

William Crotch

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July 5, 1775: William Crotch is born in Green’s Lane, St. George’s Colgate, Norwich, Norfolk, United Kingdom, the youngest son of Michael Crotch, a master carpenter, and Isabella Crotch.
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January 1, 1779: William Crotch (3) plays organ before King George III and Queen Charlotte Sophia at Buckingham Palace.
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February 18, 1779: Charles Burney reports to the Royal Society on the prodigious musical abilities of William Crotch (3).
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July 21, 1783: On their way from Reading to give a concert at Oxford, William Crotch (8) and his mother are injured when their carriage overturns.
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July 22, 1783: In spite of his injuries of yesterday, William Crotch (8) insists on participating in a scheduled concert in Oxford. He plays an organ concerto and two other pieces. After he experiences some pain in the shoulder, a surgeon is called in who discovers that William has a broken collarbone. Through the six weeks of convalescence, the surgeon will accept no money as payment, but instead asks William to write him a piece of music.
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May 27, 1785: A Concerto for harpsichord or piano by William Crotch (9) is performed for the first time, in London.
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June 4, 1789: The Captivity of Judah, an oratorio by William Crotch (13) to words of Schomberg and Owen, is performed for the first time, at Trinity Hall, Cambridge where Crotch is a student.
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July 7, 1791: Joseph Haydn (59) receives a doctorate from Oxford University. He conducts his Symphony no.92 on the occasion. Because of this it becomes known as the Oxford symphony. The organist of Christ Church, Oxford, William Crotch (16), plays the organ for Haydn during his visit.
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March 4, 1793: Publication of three piano sonatas by William Crotch (17) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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June 5, 1794: William Crotch (18) receives the degree of BMus from Oxford University.
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August 24, 1796: William Crotch (21) contributes the first of 104 entries into the manuscript collection of the Harmonic Society of Oxford. The group is formed this month by several eminent English musical figures. The society will never actually meet nor give official concerts, but the manuscripts will be circulated among the members for their use.
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July 10, 1797: William Crotch (22) marries Martha Bliss, the daughter of a bookseller, in Oxford.
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November 21, 1799: William Crotch (24) receives the degree of DMus from Oxford University. At the occasion, his Ode to Fancy on words of Warton, is performed for the first time.
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October 6, 1800: Publication of the glee Methinks I hear the full celestial Choir by William Crotch (25) to words of Thomson is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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January 27, 1804: Publication of Familiar Airs, in Various Styles, for the Piano Forte no.1 by John Crotch and William Crotch (28) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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May 18, 1804: Publication of Familiar Airs, in Various Styles, for the Piano Forte no.2 by John Crotch and William Crotch (28) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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May 20, 1805: Publication of Familiar Airs, in Various Styles, for the Piano Forte no.3 by John Crotch and William Crotch (28) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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June 25, 1805: Concerto for Organ no.3 by William Crotch (29) is performed for the first time, in Oxford.
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March 16, 1807: Publication of Prelude and Air for the Piano Forte by William Crotch is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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June 7, 1809: In London, William Crotch (33) plays a program of his own organ and piano arrangements of the music of Handel (†50) for the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the composer’s death.
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March 27, 1810: Publication of three works by William Crotch (34) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London: the glees Hail all the dear Delights, on Returning to Heathfield Park, Sweet Sylvan Scenes, and the air with variations for piano Milton Oysters or, Yeo, Yeo.
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April 21, 1812: Palestine, an oratorio by William Crotch (36) to words of Heber, is performed for the first time, in the Hanover Square Rooms, London. The capacity audience is so positive, the work will be repeated on 26 May.
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May 16, 1814: A Sinfonia in F by William Crotch (38) is performed for the first time, in London.
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March 1, 1817: Publication of Thirty Rounds for Piano Forte by William Crotch (40) is entered at Stationers’ Hall, London.
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March 24, 1823: The Royal Academy of Music opens at 4 Tenterden Street, Hanover Square, London. Its first principal is William Crotch (47).
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December 8, 1831: The committee overseeing the Royal Academy of Music resolves that William Crotch (56) no longer be allowed to instruct the female students owing to his unsatisfactory tutelage. In fact, he was found rewarding one of the girls for her excellent work in harmony with a kiss.
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December 15, 1831: Dr. William Crotch (56) announces his intention to resign his post as principal and professor of harmony at the Royal Academy of Music.
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June 21, 1832: William Crotch (56) resigns as first principal of the Royal Academy of Music.
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June 10, 1834: Captivity of Judah, an oratorio by William Crotch (58) to words of Schomberg and Owen, is performed for the first time, at ceremonies installing the Duke of Wellington as Chancellor of the University of Oxford. Also heard is the premiere of Crotch’s ode When these are days of old to words of Keble.
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June 28, 1834: William Crotch (58) makes his last public appearance, playing the organ at the Handel Festival in Westminster Abbey.
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March 30, 1836: Samuel Wesley (70) writes to William Crotch (60), sending compositions by his son, Samuel Sebastian Wesley (25), in an attempt to gain a Bachelor of Music for him. Nothing will come of it.
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June 24, 1837: Lowell Mason (45) goes to see William Crotch (61) in Kensington. They spend an hour together.
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March 10, 1843: William Crotch’s (67) anthem for chorus and orchestra The Lord is King is performed for the first time, in Exeter Hall, London.
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December 29, 1847: During dinner at the house of his son, Rev. WR Crotch, in Taunton, Somersetshire, United Kingdom, William Crotch suffers a heart attack and dies, aged 72 years, five months and 24 days. His remains will be buried in the St. Peter and Paul churchyard in Bishop’s Hull, Somerset near Taunton.