A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

George Whitefield Chadwick

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November 13, 1854: George Whitefield Chadwick is born on Fifth Street in Lowell, Massachusetts, USA, the youngest of two children born to Alonzo Calvin Chadwick, a carpenter in the Massachusetts Mills, and Hannah Godrey Fitts who comes from a family of musicians. Mrs. Chadwick will die within a week of puerperal fever.
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February 3, 1855: Two and a half months after the death of his wife from puerperal fever, Alonzo Calvin Chadwick, father of George Whitefield Chadwick (0) marries his 29-year-old neighbor, Susan Collins in Lowell, Massachusetts.
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November 9, 1872: 19:00 Fire breaks out in Boston and will continue through tomorrow. By its end it will destroy 776 buildings over 26 hectares of the city. 33 people are killed and $73,500,000 damage is done. 2,163 firefighters from 31 communities are involved. The march of the flames is finally halted by using dynamite to destroy buldings in its path. The insurance firm of A.C. Chadwick scrambles to pay claims. Its overworked clerk, George Whitefield Chadwick (17) will have to quit his studies at New England Conservatory to keep up with the massive workload.
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January 26, 1876: The Symphony no.1 in c minor op.23 by John Knowles Paine (37) is performed for the first time, at Music Hall, Boston. It is a great success, with each movement applauded by the audience which includes George Whitefield Chadwick (21).
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September 6, 1877: George Whitefield Chadwick (22) departs New York aboard the Hamburg-America ship Gellert bound for Hamburg.
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January 3, 1878: George Whitefield Chadwick (23) matriculates at Leipzig Conservatory.
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March 11, 1878: A Piano Trio in c minor by George Whitefield Chadwick (23) is performed for the first time, in the Hôtel du Pologne, Leipzig, the composer at the piano.
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May 29, 1878: String Quartet no.1 by George Whitefield Chadwick (23) is performed for the first time, in the Gewandhaus, Leipzig.
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January 1, 1879: Concerto for violin and orchestra op.77 by Johannes Brahms (45) is performed for the first time, in the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Joseph Joachim conducted by the composer. The audience, which includes George Whitefield Chadwick (24), receives the work warmly but not enthusiastically.
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May 30, 1879: String Quartet no.2 by George Whitefield Chadwick (24) is performed for the first time, in a graduation concert at the Leipzig Gewandhaus. It is very successful.
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June 20, 1879: George Whitefield Chadwick’s (24) overture Rip Van Winkle is performed for the first time, in a graduation concert at Leipzig Conservatory, conducted by the composer.
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December 13, 1879: George Whitefield Chadwick (25) withdraws from Leipzig Conservatory to return home. He has been offered a chance to conduct his music with the Boston Handel and Haydn Society. Besides, he is running out of money.
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January 7, 1881: Schön München, a symphonic waltz by George Whitefield Chadwick (26), is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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April 22, 1881: The Viking’s Last Voyage for baritone, male chorus, and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (26) is performed for the first time, in Boston, conducted by the composer. Earlier in the day, Chadwick is hired as a teacher of “free composition” at New England Conservatory.
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November 13, 1881: Horatio Parker (18) begins lessons with George Whitefield Chadwick in Chadwick’s Boston home at 149a Tremont Street. It is Chadwick’s 27th birthday.
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February 23, 1882: Symphony no.1 by George Whitefield Chadwick (27) is performed for the first time, at the Boston Museum, the composer conducting.
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April 13, 1882: Andante for orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (27) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston, conducted by the composer.
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January 12, 1883: Thalia, an overture by George Whitefield Chadwick (28), is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston, directed by the composer.
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January 3, 1884: Romanze for cello and piano by George Whitefield Chadwick (29) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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March 7, 1884: The second movement of the Symphony no.2 by George Whitefield Chadwick (29) is performed for the first time, at the Music Hall, Boston. See 10 December 1886.
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April 29, 1885: The first movement of the Symphony no.2 by George Whitefield Chadwick (30) is performed for the first time, at the Music Hall, Boston, the composer conducting. See 10 December 1886.
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June 16, 1885: George Whitefield Chadwick (30) marries Ida May Brooks in Hollis Street Church in Boston, Massachusetts. It is her second marriage.
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February 4, 1886: Three Love Songs op.8 for voice and piano by George Whitefield Chadwick (31) to words of Bates are performed for the first time, in Boston.
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February 10, 1886: The Song of the Viking for male chorus and piano by George Whitefield Chadwick (31) to words of Craigin is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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December 10, 1886: Symphony no.2 by George Whitefield Chadwick (32) is performed completely for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston, the composer conducting. See 7 March 1884 and 29 April 1885.
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February 23, 1887: Jabberwocky for male chorus by George Whitefield Chadwick (32) to words of Carroll is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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March 9, 1887: String Quartet no.3 by George Whitefield Chadwick (32) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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May 18, 1887: The song and overture The Miller’s Daughter for orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (32) to words of Tennyson is performed for the first time, in San Francisco.
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December 24, 1887: The Melpomene Overture by George Whitefield Chadwick (33) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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January 23, 1888: Quintet for piano and strings by George Whitefield Chadwick (33) is performed for the first time, in Chickering Hall, Boston.
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December 10, 1889: Lovely Rosabelle for chorus by George Whitefield Chadwick (35) is performed for the first time, in Association Hall, Boston with the composer directing the Boston Orchestral Club.
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February 27, 1891: Ballad op.6 for piano by Amy Cheney Beach (23) is performed for the first time, at the Tremont Temple in Boston. Mrs. Beach performs the premiere of the second of George Whitefield Chadwick’s (36) Two Caprices for pianoforte.
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April 2, 1891: The Pilgrims for chorus and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (36) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall Boston, conducted by the composer.
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January 29, 1892: A Pastoral Prelude for orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (37) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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April 1, 1892: George Whitefield Chadwick’s (37) operetta A Quiet Lodging to words of Bates is performed for the first time, privately, in Boston.
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May 5, 1892: Phoenix Expirans, a cantata for vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (37) is performed for the first time, in the City Hall of Springfield, Massachusetts as part of the Springfield Festival.
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October 21, 1892: Columbus March and Hymn for chorus and orchestra by John Knowles Paine (53) is performed for the first time, at the dedication ceremonies of the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Also premiered is Ode for the Opening of the World’s Fair held at Chicago 1892 for vocal soloists, chorus, orchestra, and band by George Whitefield Chadwick (37).
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March 22, 1893: George Whitefield Chadwick (38) resigns his position at South Congregational Church, Boston, as does the entire choir. The reasons are unclear, but it may be that church politics are involved.
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January 29, 1894: Tabasco, a burlesque opera by George Whitefield Chadwick (39) to words of Barnet, is performed for the first time, in the Tremont Theatre, Boston by amateurs. See 9 April 1894.
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April 9, 1894: After two performances in Connecticut, Tabasco, a burlesque opera by George Whitefield Chadwick (39) to words of Barnet, is performed for the first time in Boston by professionals, at the Boston Museum. See 29 January 1894 and 14 May 1894.
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April 21, 1894: The American Art Journal publishes the announcement by Antonín Dvorák (52) that George Whitefield Chadwick’s (39) Symphony no.3 has won the composition competition of the National Conservatory of Music.
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May 14, 1894: Tabasco, a burlesque opera by George Whitefield Chadwick (39) to words of Barnet, opens at the Broadway Theatre, New York. It is not a success and will see 48 performances. See 9 April 1894.
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October 19, 1894: Symphony no.3 by George Whitefield Chadwick (39) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston, conducted by the composer. Reviews are mixed.
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December 7, 1895: The Lily Nymph, a dramatic cantata by George Whitefield Chadwick (41) to words of Bates, is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.
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May 7, 1896: Lochinvar for baritone and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (41) to words of Scott is performed for the first time, in Springfield, Massachusetts, conducted by the composer.
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October 31, 1896: One day after the premiere of her Gaelic Symphony in Boston, George Whitefield Chadwick (41) writes to Amy Cheney Beach (29) praising her work. The symphony, said Chadwick, is good enough to make her “one of the boys”, referring to the artistic members of the Tavern Club. Beach is excluded from the club because of her sex.
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December 21, 1896: String Quartet no.4 by George Whitefield Chadwick (42) is performed for the first time, in Association Hall, Boston.
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January 1, 1897: Frank W. Hale, business manager for New England Conservatory, goes to the Boston home of George Whitefield Chadwick (42) to inform him that the faculty wish to remove the current president, Carl Faelten, and elect Chadwick in his place. Chadwick is reticent to accept. He will begin a transition next month.
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June 30, 1897: Ecce jam noctis for male chorus and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (42) to words of St. Gregory of Tours translated by Parker is performed for the first time, at commencement exercises of Yale University at which the composer receives an honorary MA.
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September 2, 1897: Registration for Fall classes opens at New England Conservatory. By this time, George Whitefield Chadwick (42) is in full control.
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February 2, 1900: The Adonais Overture of George Whitefield Chadwick (45) is performed for the first time, in the Music Hall, Boston.
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February 9, 1900: String Quartet no.5 by George Whitefield Chadwick (45) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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May 4, 1901: George Whitefield Chadwick (46) departs Boston aboard the Devonian bound for Liverpool. He is to tour Europe, investigating music schools there, to bring back improvements for his New England Conservatory.
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May 5, 1901: One day out from Boston aboard the Devonian, George Whitefield Chadwick (46) falls and fractures his ankle. He does not trust the ship’s physician and the ankle is set by another doctor on board. Chadwick is in excruciating pain for the rest of the journey.
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May 13, 1901: Still in great pain from a fractured ankle, George Whitefield Chadwick (46) arrives in Liverpool.
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May 28, 1901: After a period of convalescence, George Whitefield Chadwick (46) arrives in London to begin his work.
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June 22, 1901: His ankle still in pain, George Whitefield Chadwick (46) is forced to cut short his sojourn and return home from England.
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September 26, 1901: The lyric drama Judith by George Whitefield Chadwick (46) to words of Langdon after the composer is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in Worcester, Massachusetts conducted by the composer. This takes place during the Worcester Festival of which Chadwick is the director.
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March 7, 1902: The New England Conservatory Orchestra, under George Whitefield Chadwick (47), gives its first performance without outside help. Since 1897, Chadwick has been filling in the missing parts with organ and professional musicians.
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September 18, 1902: New England Conservatory, led by George Whitefield Chadwick (47), opens for the Fall semester in its new, still unfinished, buildings on Huntington Avenue in Boston.
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June 24, 1903: New England Conservatory, under George Whitefield Chadwick (48), holds its first graduation ceremony in the new Jordan Hall.
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October 20, 1903: A gala performance takes place to officially dedicate the new Jordan Hall at New England Conservatory. The Boston Symphony Orchestra plays free of charge. The conservatory’s president, George Whitefield Chadwick (48), leads the orchestra in his own Melpomene.
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April 23, 1904: The Euterpe Overture of George Whitefield Chadwick (49) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston, conducted by the composer.
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August 28, 1904: Three Choruses for Women’s Voices for female chorus and piano by George Whitefield Chadwick (49) to words of Meleager (tr. Perry), are performed for the first time, in New York.
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November 21, 1904: Several works by George Whitefield Chadwick (50) are performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston, conducted by the composer: Sinfonietta and Symphonic Sketches (movements 1-3) , both for orchestra, and A Ballad of Trees and the Master for solo voice and orchestra to words of Lanier.
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April 7, 1905: Sylvania: A Wedding Cantata op.46 for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra by Amy Cheney Beach (37) to words of Bancroft after Bloem is performed for the first time, in Chickering Hall, Boston. Present are George Whitefield Chadwick (50) and John Knowles Paine (66) who consider it a triumph.
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September 29, 1905: Cleopatra, a symphonic poem by George Whitefield Chadwick (50), is performed for the first time, in Mechanics Hall, Worcester, Massachusetts.
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July 4, 1906: After visiting Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and France, George Whitefield Chadwick (51) and his family arrive in England.
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February 7, 1908: Symphonic Sketches by George Whitefield Chadwick (53) is performed completely for the first time, in Boston. Critics are universally positive. See 21 November 1904.
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November 13, 1908: Theme, Variations, and Fugue for organ and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick, is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston, conducted by the composer on his 54th birthday.
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November 30, 1908: In an official ceremony, the cornerstone is laid for the new Boston Opera House. Inside the stone is a compartment containing compositions by John Knowles Paine (†2), Edward MacDowell (†0), George Whitefield Chadwick (54), Charles Martin Loeffler (47), Horatio Parker (45), Amy Beach (41), and Frederick S. Converse (37).
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June 2, 1909: Noel for vocal soloists, chorus, and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (54) is performed for the first time, in Norfolk, Connecticut.
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February 9, 1911: Incidental music to Browne’s play Everywoman by George Whitefield Chadwick (56) is performed for the first time, in Parsons Theatre, Hartford, Connecticut.
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February 27, 1911: Walter Browne’s play Everywoman, with music by George Whitefield Chadwick (56), opens at the Herald Square Theatre on Broadway. See 9 February 1911.
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March 29, 1911: The Suite Symphonique by George Whitefield Chadwick (56) is performed for the first time, in the Philadelphia Academy of Music, conducted by the composer. Reviews are generally favorable.
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June 4, 1912: Aphrodite for orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (57) is performed for the first time, in Norfolk, Connecticut, conducted by the composer.
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May 14, 1914: Aghadoe for alto and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (59) to words of Todhunter, is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston conducted by the composer.
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June 3, 1915: Two new orchestral works are premiered at the Norfolk Festival in Connecticut: Tam O’Shanter, a symphonic ballad by George Whitefield Chadwick (60) and the Piano Concerto no.2 op.126 of Charles Villiers Stanford (62).
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May 13, 1917: Not long after his son goes to the Boston Navy Yard to enlist, George Whitefield Chadwick (62) confides to his diary, “How can one think of music when the future holds such dreadful possibilities?” (Faucett 2012, 300)
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June 4, 1918: Horatio Parker’s (54) morality play The Dream of Mary op.82 to words of Chapman, is performed for the first time, in Norfolk, Connecticut. Also premiered is Land of Our Hearts for male chorus and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (63) to words of Ware, conducted by the composer.
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February 9, 1919: Angel of Death, a symphonic poem by George Whitefield Chadwick (64), is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, New York.
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May 5, 1922: Love’s Sacrifice, a pastoral opera by George Whitefield Chadwick (67) to words of Stevens, is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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June 7, 1922: The Anniversary Overture by George Whitefield Chadwick (67) is performed for the first time, in Norfolk, Connecticut conducted by the composer.
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February 17, 1924: Drake’s Drum for solo voice and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (69) to words of Newbold, is performed for the first time, in St. James Theatre, Boston, conducted by the composer. Also premiered is Chadwick’s Voice of Philomel for solo voice and orchestra to words of Stevens.
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November 3, 1925: Fanfare for three trumpets, three trombones, and timpani by George Whitefield Chadwick (70) is performed for the first time, at the unveiling of a mural by John Singer Sargent at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts.
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May 5, 1927: Fathers of the Free for chorus and orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (72) to words of Brown is performed for the first time, at New York University, the Bronx.
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March 6, 1930: Silently Swaying on the Water’s Quiet Breast for female chorus and strings by George Whitefield Chadwick (75) to words of von Scheffel (tr. Parker), is performed for the first time, in Kilbourn Hall, Rochester, New York.
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March 20, 1931: Tre Pezzi for orchestra by George Whitefield Chadwick (76) is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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April 4, 1931: About 22:00 George Whitefield Chadwick dies suddenly at his home at 360 Marlboro Street, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, from complications of arteriosclerosis, aged 76 years, four months, and 22 days.
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April 7, 1931: A funeral in memory of George Whitefield Chadwick takes place in Trinity Church, Boston. Among the honorary pallbearers are Frederick S. Converse (60) and Charles Martin Loeffler (70). His mortal remains are laid to rest in Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge.
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December 6, 1961: A quartet from Act II of George Whitefield Chadwick’s (†30) opera The Padrone to words of Stevens is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York. The work was composed in 1917. See 29 September 1995.
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September 29, 1995: The Padrone, an opera by George Whitefield Chadwick (†64) to words of Stevens after the composer, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in the Thomaston, Connecticut Opera House 82 years after it was composed. See 6 December 1961 and 11 April 1997.
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April 11, 1997: George Whitefield Chadwick’s (†66) tragic opera The Padrone to words of Stevens after the composer is staged for the first time, at New England Conservatory, Boston 85 years after it was composed. See 6 December 1961 and 29 September 1995.