A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Elliott Carter

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December 11, 1908: Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. is born on West 95th Street, between Riverside Drive and Westend Avenue, in New York, New York, USA, second of two (and sole surviving) children born to Elliott Cook Carter, Sr., a lace importer and Florence Doris Chambers.
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January 31, 1924: Pierre Monteux and the Boston Symphony Orchestra perform Le Sacre du Printemps in Carnegie Hall, New York. In the audience is an interested young man named Elliott Carter (15). After hearing this, he decides to become a composer.
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January 28, 1927: Aaron Copland’s (26) Piano Concerto is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston, the composer at the keyboard. One audience member, a Harvard student named Elliott Carter (18), goes backstage after the concert and introduces himself to Copland.
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April 22, 1927: Symphony no.1 by Roger Sessions (30) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston. The public response is mixed, the critics generally positive. In the audience is Elliott Carter (18) who is “immensely struck” and will follow Sessions’ work from now on.
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May 1, 1932: Several songs by Charles Ives (57) are performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York: The See’r and Walking to his own words, Evening to words of Milton, Maple Leaves to words of Aldrich, and The Indians to words of Sprague. The pianist is Aaron Copland (31). Also premiered is the Serenade for string quartet by Marc Blitzstein (27). In the audience is Elliott Carter (23).
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March 15, 1933: Incidental music to Sophocles’ play Philoctetes by Elliott Carter (24) is performed for the first time, in Lowell House Dining Hall, Harvard University.
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June 30, 1933: An evening performance in the Hôtel Singer-Polignac in Paris is apparently the first entire concert conducted by Nadia Boulanger (45). She directs a chorus and orchestra in cantata excerpts by JS Bach (†182), an organ transcription of a Vivaldi (†192) concerto, and the Brandenburg Concerto no.5. One of the bass choristers is an American named Elliott Carter (24). It is the first of 19 of Mlle. Boulanger’s concerts for the Princesse de Polignac over the next five years.
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May 11, 1935: Nadia Boulanger (47) writes a letter of recommendation for her student, Elliott Carter (26).
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August 17, 1936: Elliott Carter’s (27) ballet legend Pochahontas for piano is performed for the first time, at Keene State College, New Hampshire. See 24 May 1939.
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March 5, 1937: Tarantella for chorus and piano four hands by Elliott Carter (28) to words of Ovid is performed for the first time, at Milton Academy, Boston. See 17 May 1937.
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May 17, 1937: Tarantella for chorus and orchestra by Elliott Carter (28) to words of Ovid is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston. See 5 March 1937.
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March 16, 1938: To Music for soprano and chorus by Elliott Carter (29) to words of Herrick is performed for the first time, in Federal Music Theatre, New York.
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March 31, 1939: Two works for chorus are performed for the first time, in Temple Emanu-El, New York: Heart not so Heavy as Mine by Elliott Carter (30) to words of Dickinson, and Chorale Fanfare by Roy Harris (41) to words of Taggard.
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May 24, 1939: The reworked and orchestrated version of Elliott Carter’s (30) ballet Pochahontas is performed for the first time, in the Martin Beck Theatre, New York. See 17 August 1936, 4 December 1939, 4 June 1940.
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July 6, 1939: Elliott Carter (30) marries Helen Frost Jones, a sculptor and art critic, in Chatham, Massachusetts.
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September 23, 1939: Elliott Carter (30) sends the score to a suite from his ballet Pochahontas to Serge Koussevitzky in Boston, along with a letter of support from Aaron Copland (38). See 4 December 1939.
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December 4, 1939: Serge Koussevitzky writes to Elliott Carter (30) about the suite from Pochahontas that Carter sent him for possible performance in Boston. Koussevitzky calls the work “brilliant” but says it is “too light for introducing your name for the first time in the Boston Symphony programs.” (Wierzbicki, 27) Carter sent the score at the suggestion of Aaron Copland (39).
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June 4, 1940: The New York Times announces that Pochahontas, by Elliott Carter (31), has won the Juilliard School’s competition for orchestral works by American composers.
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March 12, 1942: The Defense of Corinth for speaker, male chorus, and piano-four hands by Elliott Carter (33) to words of Rabelais, is performed for the first time, in Sanders Theatre, Harvard University.
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April 27, 1944: Symphony no.1 by Elliott Carter (35) is performed for the first time, in Eastman Theatre, Rochester, New York conducted by Howard Hanson (47).
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November 12, 1944: Pastoral for piano and english horn by Elliott Carter (35) is performed for the first time, in New York the composer at the keyboard. See 25 April 1988.
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February 25, 1945: Another Music for female chorus and small orchestra by Elliott Carter (36) to words of Van Doren is performed for the first time, in Temple Emanu-El, New York. It will later be known as The Harmony of Morning.
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April 22, 1945: The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowships are announced, including ones for Lukas Foss (22), Samuel Barber (35), and Elliott Carter (36).
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December 20, 1945: Musicans Wrestle Everywhere for chorus and strings by Elliott Carter (37) to words of Dickinson, is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of WNBC radio. See 12 February 1946.
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February 12, 1946: Musicians Wrestle Everywhere for chorus and strings by Elliott Carter (37) to words of Dickinson, is performed for the first time in a concert, in New York. See 20 December 1945.
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August 21, 1946: Elegy for string quartet by Elliott Carter (37) is performed for the first time, in Eliot, Maine. See 1 March 1953.
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September 14, 1946: Warble for Lilac-Time for high voice and piano or small orchestra by Elliott Carter (37) to words of Whitman, is performed for the first time, in Saratoga Springs, New York. Also premiered are two works for chamber orchestra by Otto Luening (46): Pilgrim’s Hymn and Prelude.
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February 16, 1947: Piano Sonata by Elliott Carter (38) is performed for the first time, in a broadcast over the airwaves of radio station WNYC from the Frick Art Museum, New York. See 5 March 1947.
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March 5, 1947: Piano Sonata by Elliott Carter (38) is performed live for the first time, in New York Times Hall, New York. See 16 February 1947.
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March 16, 1947: Two works for voice and piano by Elliott Carter (38) are performed for the first time, in the Museum of Modern Art, New York: Voyage, to words of Crane, and Warble for Lilac-Time to words of Whitman. Also premiered is String Quartet no.3 by David Diamond (31). See 14 September 1946 and 8 August 1974.
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March 26, 1947: The Minotaur, a ballet by Elliott Carter (38) to a scenario by George Ballanchine, is performed for the first time, in the Central High School of Needle Trades, New York.
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June 19, 1947: Aaron Copland (46) and Elliott Carter (38) meet with Conlon Nancarrow (34) in Mexico City. During the stay of Carter and his wife, Copland will also take them to El Salón Mexico.
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February 21, 1949: Woodwind Quintet by Elliott Carter (40) is performed for the first time, in a radio broadcast from Times Hall, New York.
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February 27, 1949: Woodwind Quintet by Elliott Carter (40) is performed in concert for the first time, in Times Hall, New York.
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February 27, 1950: Sonata for cello and piano by Elliott Carter (41) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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April 16, 1950: The John Simon Guggenheim Foundation fellowships are announced, including ones for Robert Ward (32), Elliott Carter (41), Irving Fine (35), and Harry Partch (48).
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March 18, 1951: The second part of Emblems for male chorus and piano by Elliott Carter (43) to words of Tate is performed for the first time, at Harvard University.
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May 6, 1952: Six Pieces for kettle drums and orchestra by Elliott Carter (43) is performed for the first time, at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
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October 28, 1952: The first public “concert” of tape-recorder music in the United States takes place at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. It is given by the Columbia University electronic music group and includes premieres of Sonic Contours for tape by Vladimir Ussachevsky (41) and three works for flute on tape by Otto Luening: Fantasy in Space, Invention in Twelve Tones, and Low Speed . The flutist in all three Luening pieces is the composer. The performance is broadcast by radio stations WNYC New York and WGBH Boston. A Tanglewood student named Luciano Berio (27) is present and is fascinated. Also premiered is Eight Studies and a Fantasy for flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon by Elliott Carter (43).
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February 26, 1953: String Quartet no.1 by Elliott Carter (44) is performed for the first time, in the McMillin Theatre, Columbia University, New York.
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March 1, 1953: Elliott Carter’s (44) Elegy for string orchestra is performed for the first time, in Cooper Union, New York. See 21 August 1946.
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November 10, 1953: Elliott Carter’s (44) Sonata for flute, oboe, cello, and harpsichord is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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April 21, 1956: Variations for Orchestra by Elliott Carter (47) is performed for the first time, in Columbia Auditorium, Louisville.
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June 17, 1957: Agon, a ballet by Igor Stravinsky, is performed for the first time, in a concert setting in Los Angeles on the composer’s 75th birthday. Elliott Carter (48) is in the audience. See 1 December 1957.
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January 28, 1960: Elliott Carter (51) writes to the State Department, declining an invitation to travel to the USSR with Aaron Copland (59), and Norman Dello Joio (47).
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March 25, 1960: String Quartet no.2 by Elliott Carter (51) is performed for the first time, in Juilliard Concert Hall, New York. See 2 May 1960.
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May 2, 1960: Elliott Carter (51) wins the Pulitzer Prize in Music for his String Quartet no.2. See 25 March 1960.
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September 6, 1961: Two new works are performed for the first time, in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium at the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art, New York: Elliott Carter’s (52) Double Concerto for harpsichord, piano, and two chamber orchestras, and Vision and Prayer for soprano and tape by Milton Babbitt (45).
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November 13, 1961: Pablo Casals gives a recital at the White House before President and Mrs. Kennedy and 200 invited guests. Among those attending are the elite of the musical culture of the United States: Walter Piston (67), Howard Hanson (65), Virgil Thomson (64), Roger Sessions (64), Henry Cowell (64), Roy Harris (63), Aaron Copland (60), Elliott Carter (52), Samuel Barber (51), William Schuman (51), Alan Hovhaness (50), Gian Carlo Menotti (50), Norman Dello Joio (48), Leonard Bernstein (43), Eugene Ormandy, and Leopold Stokowski. The concert is recorded and will be televised. Bernstein will recall “I’ve never seen so many happy artists in my life.”
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May 13, 1962: Piece for Piano and 16 Instruments by Stefan Wolpe (59) is performed for the first time, at the New School, New York conducted by Ralph Shapey (41). Also premiered are Shapey's Dimensions for soprano and 23 instruments and Chamber Concerto by Arthur Berger (49). Shapey will remember it as one of the most exciting days of his life. In the audience are Edgar Varèse (76), Aaron Copland (61), Elliott Carter (53), Milton Babbitt (46), Erich Leinsdorf, Harold Rosenburg, Dore Ashton, Jack Tworkove, and Willem de Kooning. It is a great success.
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July 15, 1966: In a production of Igor Stravinsky’s (84) L’histoire du soldat at Lincoln Center, New York, conducted by Lukas Foss (43), Elliott Carter (57) plays the soldier, John Cage (53) plays the Devil, and Aaron Copland (65) is the narrator. Stravinsky, who is in the audience, tells Cage: “You are the only sensible composer I know--You don’t write any notes.”
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July 18, 1966: Igor Stravinsky (84), Elliott Carter (57), and their wives are at dinner in La Côte Basque in New York. The two composers are engaged in intent conversation when an admirer walks over to the table and places pen and paper next to Stravinsky for his autograph. Without looking up, Stravinsky signs the paper and returns to his discussion. The admirer returns to his table with his fiancée, Mia Farrow. Tomorrow, the admirer, Frank Sinatra, will marry Ms. Farrow in Las Vegas.
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January 6, 1967: Piano Concerto by Elliott Carter (58) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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October 9, 1967: Elliott Carter (58) writes from Bellagio, Italy to Secretary of State Dean Rusk asking if anything could be done for Isang Yun (50), who was kidnapped by South Korean agents from West Berlin last July. Rusk will not reply.
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October 20, 1967: A petition in support of Isang Yun (50), signed by 160 composers, musicians, and scholars, appears in Die Zeit. Among the signers are Igor Stravinsky (85) and Elliott Carter (58).
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April 9, 1968: Elliott Carter (59) is one of three people who signed a letter appearing in the New York Times appealing to the South Korean government for clemency in the espionage case of Isang Yun (50).
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May 29, 1969: Isang Yun (51) writes from Berlin to Elliott Carter (60) and his wife thanking them for trying to help him after his kidnapping and trial in Korea.
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February 5, 1970: Concerto for Orchestra by Elliott Carter (61), composed to celebrate the 125th anniversary of the New York Philharmonic, is performed for the first time, in New York conducted by Leonard Bernstein (51). The work receives a favorable response from the audience.
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May 26, 1971: Elliott Carter (62) and Alexander Calder are presented with the Gold Medal Award of the National Institute of Arts and Sciences.
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January 23, 1972: Canon for 3: in memoriam Igor Stravinsky (†0) for three equal instruments by Elliott Carter (63) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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April 10, 1972: A service in memory Stefan Wolpe is held at The Riverside Funeral Home, Amsterdam Avenue, New York. Among the speakers are Milton Babbitt (55), John Cage (59), and Elliott Carter (63). Wolpe’s earthly remains are cremated.
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January 23, 1973: String Quartet no.3 by Elliott Carter (64) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York. See 7 May 1973.
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May 7, 1973: Elliott Carter (64) wins the Pulitzer Prize in Music for the second time, for his String Quartet no.3. See 23 January 1973.
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December 12, 1973: In honor of his 65th birthday, the New York Public Library opens an exhibition entitled “Elliott Carter: Sketches and Scores in Manuscript.”
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August 8, 1974: Voyage for voice and orchestra by Elliott Carter (65) to words of Crane is performed for the first time, in Aspen, Colorado. See 16 March 1947.
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October 20, 1974: Brass Quintet by Elliott Carter (65) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC originating in London. See 15 November 1974.
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November 15, 1974: Brass Quintet by Elliott Carter (65) is performed in concert for the first time, in Coolidge Auditorium, Washington. See 20 October 1974.
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January 13, 1975: A Fantasy About Purcell’s “Fantasia Upon One Note” for brass quintet by Elliott Carter (66) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York.
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March 21, 1975: Duo for violin and piano by Elliott Carter (66) is performed for the first time, in the Great Hall, Cooper Union, New York.
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February 24, 1976: A Mirror on Which to Dwell, a cycle for soprano and chamber group by Elliott Carter (67) to words of Bishop, is performed for the first time, in Hunter College Playhouse, New York.
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February 17, 1977: A Symphony of Three Orchestras by Elliott Carter (68) is performed for the first time, in Avery Fisher Hall, New York, under the baton of Pierre Boulez (51).
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May 3, 1978: Birthday Fanfare for Sir William Glock’s 70th for three trumpets, vibraphone, and glockenspiel by Elliott Carter (69) is performed for the first time, in London.
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December 10, 1978: Syringa for mezzo-soprano, bass, and eleven players by Elliott Carter to words of Ashbery and ancient Greek texts, is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York on the eve of the composer’s 70th birthday.
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June 2, 1980: Night Fantasies for piano by Elliott Carter (71) is performed for the first time, in the Assembly Rooms, Bath, Great Britain.
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April 8, 1981: The Ernst von Siemens Prize is awarded to Elliott Carter (72) in ceremonies at the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, Munich.
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October 26, 1982: In Sleep, in Thunder, a cycle for tenor and 14 players by Elliott Carter (73) to words of Lowell, is performed for the first time, in St. John’s, Smith Square, London.
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April 23, 1983: The Triple Duo by Elliott Carter (74) for violin, cello, flute, clarinet, piano, and percussion is performed for the first time, in Symphony Space, New York.
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September 21, 1983: Two works for piano by Betsy Jolas (57) are performed for the first time, in Le Havre: Calling EC (hommage à Elliott Carter (74)) and Une Journée de Gadad, suite pour enfants.
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December 5, 1983: Sonata Waltzer for piano by Shulamit Ran (34) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York to celebrate the 75th birthday of Elliott Carter.
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December 11, 1983: Changes for guitar by Elliott Carter is performed for the first time, in the 92nd Street Y, New York on the composer’s 75th birthday.
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June 8, 1984: Canon for 4, Homage to William for flute, bass clarinet, violin, and cello by Elliott Carter (75) is performed for the first time, in Bath, Great Britain.
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June 15, 1984: Riconoscenza per Goffredo Petrassi for solo violin by Elliott Carter (75) is performed for the first time, in the Abbey of Fossanova, Priverno, Italy.
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March 31, 1985: Esprit rude l’esprit doux for flute and clarinet by Elliott Carter (76) and dedicated to Pierre Boulez (60), is performed for the first time, in the Weinbrenner-Saal, Baden-Baden. On the same program is the premiere of A Pierre. Dell’azzurro silenzio, inquietum for contrabass flute, contrabass clarinet and electronic sound generators by Luigi Nono (61), and Fusées for orchestra by Wolfgang Rihm (33).
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July 26, 1985: Penthode for five instrumental quartets by Elliott Carter (76) is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London conducted by Pierre Boulez (60).
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September 17, 1986: String Quartet no.4 by Elliott Carter (77) is performed for the first time, in Gusman Concert Hall at the University of Miami, Florida.
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December 16, 1986: For Elliott at 75 for piano, a birthday piece for Elliott Carter (78) by Arthur Berger (74), is performed for the first time, in New York.
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April 10, 1987: A Celebration of Some 100x150 Notes for orchestra by Elliott Carter (78) is performed for the first time, at the Jesse H. Jones Hall for the Performing Arts, Houston. See 5 October 1989.
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April 25, 1988: Pastoral for english horn or alto saxophone, marimba, and strings by Elliott Carter (79) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York. See 12 November 1944.
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May 16, 1988: Enchanted Preludes for flute and cello by Elliott Carter (79) are performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York.
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June 17, 1988: Elliott Carter’s (79) Oboe Concerto is performed for the first time, in the Grosser Tonhallesaal, Zürich.
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August 10, 1988: Remembrance for orchestra by Elliott Carter (79) is performed for the first time, at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts. See 5 October 1989.
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September 14, 1988: Birthday Flourish for five trumpets or brass quintet by Elliott Carter (79) is performed for the first time, in Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco.
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December 1, 1988: Slides for chamber ensemble by Witold Lutoslawski (75) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York, composed in honor of Elliott Carter’s 80th birthday on 11 December.
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October 5, 1989: Anniversary, the third of Three Occasions for Orchestra by Eliott Carter (80) is performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London as part of the first complete performance of Three Occasions for Orchestra . See 10 April 1987 and 10 August 1988.
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May 2, 1990: Violin Concerto by Elliott Carter (81) is performed for the first time, in Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco.
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September 29, 1990: Con Leggerezza Pensosa--Omaggio a Italo Calvino for clarinet, violin, and cello by Elliott Carter (81) is performed for the first time, in the Istituto di Studi Musicali, Latina, Italy.
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April 29, 1991: The first meeting of the board of the Aaron Copland (†0) Fund for Music takes place in New York. The board members, named by Copland in his will, include Elliott Carter (82), William Schuman (80), Arthur Berger (78), Jacob Druckman (62), and David Del Tredici (54). Jacob Druckman is chosen as president.
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July 20, 1991: Scrivo in Vento for flute by Elliott Carter (82) is performed for the first time, in Centre Acanthes, Avignon.
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March 23, 1992: Bariolage for harp, part of Trilogy by Elliott Carter (83), is performed for the first time, at Salle Patino, Geneva. See 30 June 1992.
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April 25, 1992: Inner Song for oboe, part of Trilogy by Elliott Carter (83) is performed for the first time, in the Theatersaal, Witten, Germany. Also premiered is Five4 for two saxophones and three percussionists by John Cage (79) and Duo Concertante for clarinet, cello, and eight players by Magnus Lindberg (33). See 30 June 1992.
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June 30, 1992: Trilogy for oboe and harp by Elliott Carter (83) is performed completely for the first time, at the Pontino Festival, Castello Caetani, Sermonetta, Italy. Bariolage for harp was performed on 23 March. Inner Song for oboe was performed on 25 April. The third section, Immer Neu, is performed for the first time today.
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September 13, 1992: Quintet for oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, and piano by Elliott Carter (83) is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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June 4, 1993: Music to the play Gra for clarinet by Elliott Carter (84) is performed for the first time at the Pontino Festival, Castello Caetani, Sermonetta, Italy. The work is a tribute to Witold Lutoslawski on his 80th birthday.
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February 17, 1994: Partita for orchestra by Elliott Carter (85) is performed for the first time, in Orchestra Hall, Chicago. See 25 April 1998.
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June 11, 1994: 90+ for piano by Elliott Carter (85) is performed for the first time, at the Pontino Festival in Castello Caetani, Sermonetta, Italy.
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October 13, 1994: Several works are premiered in Merkin Hall, New York: Fragment for string quartet by Elliott Carter (85), Ned Rorem’s (70) Somewhere... for voice and piano the composer at the keyboard, Base for piano, left hand by Louis Andriessen (55), Quartet Movement in Memoriam DH by Robin Holloway (50), Spirit Quartet for string quartet and electronics by Tod Machover (40) and Music, minus one for string quartet and one other musician by Steven Mackey (38).
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March 30, 1995: Esprit rude/Esprit doux II for flute, clarinet, and marimba by Elliott Carter (86) is performed for the first time, in Grainger Ballroom of Orchestra Hall, Chicago. It was composed to honor Pierre Boulez (70) on his 70th birthday.
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May 8, 1995: Figment I for cello by Elliott Carter (86) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Hall, New York.
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June 23, 1995: Of Challenge and of Love, a cycle for voice and piano by Elliott Carter (86) to words of Hollander, is performed for the first time, in Snape Maltings, Aldeburgh.
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September 13, 1995: Adagio Tenebroso for orchestra by Elliott Carter (86) is performed for the first time, at a BBC Proms concert in Royal Albert Hall, London. See 25 April 1998.
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September 19, 1995: String Quartet no.5 by Elliott Carter (86) is performed for the first time, in De Singel, Antwerp.
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April 27, 1996: Several new works are performed for the first time in the Concert Hall of the Stadt-Casino, Basel: A 6 Letter Letter for english horn by Elliott Carter (87); Sur Incises for solo piano, two pianos, three harps, two vibraphones, and marimba by Pierre Boulez (71); An Eye, open for soprano, two clarinets, viola, cello, and double bass by Harrison Birtwistle (61) to words of Celan (tr. Hamburger); and Kol Od for trumpet and chamber orchestra by Luciano Berio (70). All but the Carter are conducted by Pierre Boulez. See 28 April 1996 and 30 August 1998.
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January 10, 1997: Clarinet Concerto by Elliott Carter (88) is performed for the first time, in Le Châtelet, Paris, conducted by Pierre Boulez (71).
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May 22, 1997: Allegro Scorrevole for orchestra by Elliott Carter (88) is performed for the first time, in Severance Hall, Cleveland. See 25 April 1998.
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June 11, 1997: Shard for guitar by Elliott Carter (88) is performed for the first time, in Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark.
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March 31, 1998: Luimen for trumpet, trombone, harp, vibraphone, mandolin, and guitar by Elliott Carter (89) is performed for the first time, in Paradiso, Amsterdam.
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April 25, 1998: Symphonia: sum fluxae pretium spei for orchestra by Elliott Carter (89) is performed completely for the first time, in Manchester, England. It is made up of Carter’s Partita, Adagio Tenebroso and Allegro Scorevole . See 17 February 1994, 13 September 1995, and 22 May 1997.
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July 1, 1998: Tempo e tempi, a song for soprano, oboe, clarinet, violin, and cello by Elliott Carter (89) to words of Montale, is performed for the first time, at the Pontino Festival, Castelo Caetani, Sermoneta, Italy. See 24 May 2000.
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November 18, 1998: Quintet for piano and strings by Elliott Carter (89) is performed for the first time, in Coolidge Auditorium of the Library of Congress, Washington.
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May 22, 1999: Statement—Remembering Aaron for violin by Elliott Carter (90) is performed for the first time, in the Grieghallen, Bergen.
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June 23, 1999: Fragment no.2 for string quartet by Elliott Carter (90) is performed for the first time, in the Cuvilliestheater, Munich. Also premiered is Fetzen for string quartet by Wolfgang Rihm (47) and Settori for string quartet by Olga Neuwirth (30).
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September 16, 1999: What Next?, an opera by Elliott Carter (90) to words of Griffiths, is performed publicly for the first time, in the Staatsoper Unter den Linden, Berlin.  See 16 May 1999.
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November 18, 1999: Fantasy—Remembering Roger for violin by Elliott Carter (90) is performed for the first time, in Paine Concert Hall, Harvard University.
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March 2, 2000: New works for solo piano are performed for the first time, in Weill Recital Hall, New York: Two Diversions for piano by Elliott Carter (91), On an Unwritten Letter by John Harbison (61), Image de Moreau by Louis Andriessen (60), Zwiesprache for piano by Wolfgang Rihm (47), and Dew-Fall-Drops by Tan Dun (42).
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March 26, 2000: Several works are performed for the first time, in South Bank Center, London, in honor of the 75th birthday of Pierre Boulez: Retrouvailles for piano by Elliott Carter (91), Hommage à Pierre Boulez for piano by György Kurtág (74), Ostinato with Melody for piano by Harrison Birtwistle (65), Vers for piano by Jonathan Harvey (60), Piano Jubilees for piano by Magnus Lindberg (41), and Piano Etude no.6 by Unsuk Chin (38).
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April 26, 2000: Asko Concerto for 16 players by Elliott Carter (91) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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May 24, 2000: Tempo e tempi, a cycle for voice, oboe, clarinet, violin, and cello by Elliott Carter (91) to words of Montale, Ungaretti, and Quasimodo, is performed completely for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London. See 1 July 1998.
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March 28, 2001: Rhapsodic Musings (for Robert Mann) for violin by Elliott Carter (92) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Hall, New York.
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September 2, 2001: Oboe Quartet by Elliott Carter (92) is performed for the first time, in the Mattäuskirche, Lucerne. Upon receiving the score, the dedicatee Heinz Holliger, was so pleased he proposed two more works from Carter.
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September 27, 2001: Concerto for cello and orchestra by Elliott Carter (92) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Chicago.
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October 17, 2001: Popular music entertainer Shawn Carter (aka Jay-Z) pleads guilty to stabbing a record producer in 1999. He will be sentenced to three years probation.
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October 17, 2001: Steep Steps for bass clarinet by Elliott Carter (92) is performed for the first time, in Weill Recital Hall, Carnegie Hall, New York.
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December 2, 2001: Figment II: Remembering Mr. Ives for cello by Elliott Carter (92) is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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December 9, 2001: Hiyoku for two clarinets by Elliott Carter (92) is performed for the first time, in the Kleine Zaal of the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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June 12, 2002: Four new works are performed for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London: Au Quai for orchestra by Elliott Carter (93), Two Notes for Ollie op.74 for eleven players by Alexander Goehr (69), A Very Sharp Trumpet for trumpet by Louis Andriessen (61) and Bubo bubo for chamber ensemble by Magnus Lindberg (43).
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December 3, 2002: Retracing for bassoon by Elliott Carter (93) is performed for the first time, in Weill Recital Hall, Carnegie Hall, New York.
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April 3, 2003: Boston Concerto for orchestra by Elliott Carter (94) is performed for the first time, in Boston.
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May 17, 2003: Helen Frost-Jones Carter, wife of Elliott Carter (94), dies at the age of 95.
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May 29, 2003: Of Rewaking for voice and orchestra by Elliott Carter (94) to words of Williams is performed for the first time, in Orchestra Hall, Chicago.
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January 15, 2004: Micomicón for orchestra by Elliott Carter (95) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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January 23, 2004: Dialogues for piano and chamber orchestra by Elliott Carter (95) is performed for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London.
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January 30, 2004: Ninety-six for quintet by Frederick Rzewski (65) is performed for the first time, at a concert to honor Elliott Carter (95) at the Angel Orensanz Foundation Center, New York. Also premiered is for ec for string quartet by Christian Wolff (69).
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May 5, 2004: Call for two trumpets and horn by Elliott Carter (95) is performed for the first time, in United Artists Battery Park Theatre, New York.
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February 15, 2005: Réflexions for chamber ensemble by Elliott Carter (96) is performed for the first time, at Cité de la Musique, Paris, conducted by the dedicatee, Pierre Boulez (79).
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March 16, 2005: Two works are performed for the first time, in the Purcell Room, London: Mosaic for eight instruments by Elliott Carter (96), and Cantus Iambeus for 13 instruments by Harrison Birtwistle (70).
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October 6, 2005: Three Illusions for Orchestra (Micomicón, Fons juventatis, More’s Utopia) by Elliott Carter (96) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston. See 15 January 2004.
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October 6, 2005: Soundings for orchestra by Elliott Carter (96) is performed for the first time, in Orchestra Hall, Chicago.
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May 3, 2006: Intermittences for piano by Elliott Carter (97) is performed for the first time, in Miller Auditorium, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
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July 25, 2006: A performance of Igor Stravinsky’s (†25) L’Histoire du Soldat takes place at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts. The part of the soldier is taken by Elliott Carter (97), the devil is Milton Babbitt (90), and the narrator is read by John Harbison (67).
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October 15, 2006: In the Distances of Sleep, a cycle for mezzo-soprano and chamber ensemble by Elliott Carter (97) to words of Stevens, is performed for the first time, in Zankel Hall, New York.
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December 11, 2006: Caténaires for piano by Elliott Carter is performed for the first time, in Zankel Hall, New York, on the composer’s 98th birthday.
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May 27, 2007: HBHH for oboe by Elliott Carter (98) is performed for the first time, in Remise, Karthause Ittingen, Warth, Switzerland.
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August 27, 2007: Matribute for piano by Elliott Carter (98) is performed for the first time, in the Konzertsaal, Kultur-und Kongreßzentrum, Lucerne.
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October 19, 2007: La Musique for voice by Elliott Carter (98) to words of Baudelaire, is performed for the first time, at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.
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November 15, 2007: Concerto for horn and orchestra by Elliott Carter (98) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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January 18, 2008: Figment III for double bass by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, in Merkin Concert Hall, New York.
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January 22, 2008: Figment IV for viola by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, in Salle des Concerts, Cité de la Musique, Paris.
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January 25, 2008: Elliott for string quartet by Roger Reynolds (73) in honor of Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, in Paris.
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April 7, 2008: Figment III for double bass by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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April 29, 2008: Clarinet Quintet by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, at the Juilliard School, New York.
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July 20, 2008: Sound Fields for string orchestra by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, during the Carter centennial celebration at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts.
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July 22, 2008: Mad Regales for six solo voices by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, during the Carter centennial celebration at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts.
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September 9, 2008: Flute Concerto by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, at the YMCA in Jerusalem.
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December 2, 2008: Tintinnabulation for six percussionists by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, in Jordan Hall, Boston.
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December 4, 2008: Interventions for piano and orchestra by Elliott Carter (99) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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December 12, 2008: Duettino for violin and cello by Elliott Carter (100) is performed for the first time, in Zankel Hall, New York.
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December 13, 2008: Poems of Louis Zukofsky for mezzo-soprano and clarinet by Elliott Carter (100) is performed for the first time, in Avery Fisher Hall, New York.
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December 16, 2008: Wind Rose for winds by Elliott Carter (100) is performed for the first time, at the Barbican Center in London.
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May 2, 2009: Figment V for solo marimba by Elliott Carter (100) is performed for the first time, in Frederick Loewe Theatre of New York University, New York.
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June 20, 2009: Three works by Elliott Carter (100) are performed for the first time, in Aldeburgh: Fratribute and Sistribute, both for piano, and On Conversing with Paradise for baritone and ensemble to words of Pound.
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August 9, 2009: Poems of Louis Zukofsky for clarinet and soprano by Elliott Carter (100) is performed for the first time, at Tanglewood, Lenox, Massachusetts.
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October 5, 2009: Due Duetti for violin and cello by Elliott Carter (100) is performed for the first time, in the Guggenheim Museum, New York.
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February 11, 2010: Two works by Elliott Carter (101) are performed for the first time, at the Juilliard School, New York: Nine by Five for woodwind quintet, and Retracing II for solo horn.
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June 26, 2010: What are Years? for soprano and chamber ensemble by Elliott Carter (101) to words of Moore, is performed for the first time, in Snape Maltings Concert Hall, Aldeburgh.
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December 10, 2010: Concertino for bass clarinet and chamber orchestra by Elliott Carter is performed for the first time, in Isabel Bader Theatre, Toronto on the eve of his 102nd birthday.
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June 26, 2011: “Conversations” from Two Controversies and a Conversation for piano, percussion and chamber orchestra by Elliott Carter (102) is performed for the first time, at Snape Maltings, Aldeburgh.
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October 11, 2011: Double Trio for trumpet, trombone, percussion, piano, violin, and cello by Elliott Carter (102) is performed for the first time, in Salle de concert Bourgie, Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, Montreal.
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November 9, 2011: Trije glasbeniki for flute, bass clarinet, and harp by Elliott Carter (102) is performed for the first time, in Marjana Kozina Hall, Ljubljana.
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November 18, 2011: Retracing III for trumpet by Elliott Carter (102) is performed for the first time, in Marjana Kozina Hall, Ljubljana.
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December 8, 2011: Four works by Elliott Carter (102) are performed for the first time, at the 92nd Street Y, New York: String Trio, A Sunbeam’s Architecture, a cycle for tenor and chamber orchestra to words of cummings, and the miniatures Mnemosyné for violin, and Rigmarole for cello and bass clarinet.
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December 12, 2011: Three Explorations for solo voice, winds, and brass by Elliott Carter (103) to words of Eliot is performed for the first time, in Alice Tully Hall, New York.
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June 8, 2012: Two Controversies and a Conversation for piano, percussion, and orchestra by Elliott Carter (103) is performed for the first time, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
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October 25, 2012: Dialogues II for piano and chamber orchestra by Elliott Carter (103) is performed for the first time, in Teatro alla Scala, Milan.
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November 5, 2012: Elliott Cook Carter, Jr. dies in his apartment in Greenwich Village, New York, New York, USA, aged 103 years, ten months, and 24 days. His earthly remains will be laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn.
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February 7, 2013: Instances for chamber orchestra by Elliott Carter (†0) is performed for the first time, in Benaroya Hall, Seattle.
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June 22, 2013: Two works for chamber ensemble by Magnus Lindberg (54) are performed for the first time, in Snape Maltings, Aldeburgh: Aldeburgh Trilogy and Red House. Also premiered is Epigrams for piano trio by Elliott Carter (†0).
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March 8, 2015: The American Sublime for baritone and chamber ensemble by Elliott Carter (†2) to words of Stevens, is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall, New York.