A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Arnold Bax

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November 8, 1883: 08:30 Arnold Edward Trevor Bax is born at Heath Villa, Angles Road, Streatham, Surrey, United Kingdom, the first of four children born to Alfred Ridley Bax, a barrister and antiquarian, and Charlotte Ellen Lea, daughter of a Congregational minister and missionary.
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April 29, 1903: A Sonata for violin and piano in g minor by Arnold Bax (19) is performed for the first time, privately, at the Bax family home in Hampstead, the composer at the piano. See 4 June 1907.
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July 23, 1903: The Grand Match, a song for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (19) to words of O’Neill, is performed for the first time, in St. James’ Hall, London, the composer at the piano. It is the first public performance of the music of Bax.
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November 23, 1903: The second movement of a String Quartet in A by Arnold Bax (20) is performed for the first time, in a student concert of the Royal Academy of Music in St. James’ Hall, London.
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November 9, 1904: Cathaleen-ni-Hoolihan for two violins and piano by Arnold Bax (21) is performed for the first time, privately, at the Bax family home in Hampstead, the composer at the keyboard.
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November 21, 1904: Three songs from A Celtic Song Cycle for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (21) to words of MacLeod, are performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London, the composer at the keyboard. They are Eilidh my Fawn, Closing Doors, and At the Last. See 14 June 1907.
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December 6, 1904: Three songs for voice and piano by Frank Bridge (25) are performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London: A Dead Violet and A Dirge, both to words of Shelley, and Night Lies on the Silent Highways to words of Heine (tr. Kroeker). Also premiered is Concert Piece for viola and piano by Arnold Bax (21), the composer at the keyboard.
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March 8, 1905: Introduction and Allegro op.47 for string quartet and string orchestra and the Pomp and Circumstance March no.3 by Edward Elgar (47) are performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London, the composer conducting. Arnold Bax (21) is in the audience.
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April 4, 1905: A Connemara Revel for orchestra by Arnold Bax (21) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London, at a student concert of the Royal Academy of Music. It is the first performance of an orchestral work by Bax.
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December 13, 1906: An Irish Overture for orchestra by Arnold Bax (23) is performed for the first time, at the Winter Gardens, Bournemouth.
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June 4, 1907: A Sonata for violin and piano in g minor by Arnold Bax (23) is performed publicly for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London, the composer at the piano. See 29 April 1903.
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June 14, 1907: A Celtic Song Cycle for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (21) to words of MacLeod, is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Small Hall, London, the composer at the keyboard. See 21 November 1904.
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June 20, 1908: The Fairies for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (24) to words of Allingham, is performed for the first time, in Bechstein Hall, London.
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July 16, 1908: In the first concert devoted entirely to the music of Arnold Bax (24), his String Quintet in G is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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April 19, 1909: Into the Twilight for orchestra by Arnold Bax (25) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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September 24, 1909: The first festival of The Musical League takes place in Liverpool today and tomorrow. It features music by English composers including Ethel Smyth (51), Frederick Delius (47), Ralph Vaughan Williams (36), Frank Bridge (30), Percy Grainger (27), and Arnold Bax (25).
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September 25, 1909: Fatherland, for tenor, chorus, and orchestra by Arnold Bax (25) to words of Runeberg, is performed for the first time, in Philharmonic Hall, Liverpool. Also premiered is Dance Rhapsody by Frank Bridge (30).
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August 30, 1910: In the Faery Hills for orchestra by Arnold Bax (26) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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January 28, 1911: Arnold Bax (27) marries Elsa Luisa (Elsita) Sobrino in the Marylebone Registry Office, London. Her father is a concert pianist, her mother an operatic soprano.
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April 25, 1911: Piano Sonata no.1 in f# minor by Arnold Bax (27) is performed for the first time, in Bechstein Hall, London. The audience is very pleased.
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June 2, 1911: The first movement of a Sonata in d minor for piano by Arnold Bax (27) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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March 13, 1912: Enchanted Summer for two sopranos, chorus, and orchestra by Arnold Bax (28), to words of Shelley, is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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March 27, 1912: Festival Overture for orchestra by Arnold Bax (28) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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June 25, 1912: Prelude to Adonais for orchestra by Arnold Bax (28) is performed for the first time, in the Haymarket Theatre, London. On the same bill is the premiere of Proserpina, a ballet by Hubert Parry (64) to a story by Shelley.
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November 12, 1912: The first of the Two Russian Tone Pictures for piano by Arnold Bax (29) entitled May-Night in the Ukraine, is performed for the first time, at the Royal Academy Musical Union, London. (This could be 2 November)
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March 4, 1913: The Cloud Messenger for chorus and orchestra by Gustav Holst (38), to words of Kalidasa, translated by the composer, is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. On the same program is the premiere of Christmas Eve on the Mountains for orchestra by Arnold Bax (29).
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April 9, 1913: The second of the Two Russian Tone Pictures for piano by Arnold Bax (29) entitled Gopak, is performed for the first time, in Bechstein Hall, London.
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September 23, 1913: The first and fourth of the Four Orchestral Sketches by Arnold Bax (29) are performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. See 20 March 1914.
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March 20, 1914: The first complete performance of the Four Orchestral Sketches by Arnold Bax (30) takes place in Queen’s Hall, London. See 23 September 1913.
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March 27, 1914: The Symphony no.2 “A London Symphony” by Ralph Vaughan Williams (41) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. Also on the program is the premiere of Three Songs with Orchestra by Arnold Bax (30), to words of Fiona Macleod, anonymous, and the composer.
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June 18, 1914: The first movement of the Violin Sonata no.1 by Arnold Bax (30) is performed for the first time, in Steinway Hall, London. See 21 April 1983.
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March 24, 1915: Idyll: The Maiden with the Daffodil for piano by Arnold Bax (31) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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April 29, 1915: In a Vodka Shop and The Princess’ Rose Garden for piano by Arnold Bax (31) are performed for the first time, in Grafton Galleries. See 25 July 1919.
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November 18, 1915: Apple-Blossom-Time for piano by Arnold Bax (32) is performed for the first time, in Steinway Hall, London.
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June 28, 1916: Three chamber works by Arnold Bax (32) are performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London: Four Pieces for flute and piano (under the title Four Dances), Legend, and Ballad, both for violin and piano.
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December 5, 1916: Moy Mell: An Irish Tone Poem for two pianos by Arnold Bax (33) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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March 26, 1917: Elegiac Trio for flute, viola and harp by Arnold Bax (33) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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December 7, 1917: From Dusk Till Dawn, a ballet by Arnold Bax (34) to a scenario by Lowther, is performed for the first time, in the Palace Theatre, London.
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December 19, 1917: Quintet in g minor for piano and strings by Arnold Bax (34) is performed for the first time, privately, in the Savoy Hotel, London. See 12 May 1920.
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March 10, 1918: In memoriam: An Irish Elegy by Arnold Bax (34) for english horn, harp, and string quartet is performed for the first time, privately, at the Plough Club, London. See 13 February 1919.
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April 27, 1918: Folk-Tale for cello and piano by Arnold Bax (34) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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June 7, 1918: The String Quartet no.1 by Arnold Bax (34) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London. It is dedicated to Edward Elgar (61). Also premiered is Four Preludes for piano by John Ireland (38), played by the composer.
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November 9, 1918: “Gipsy Song” from The Bard of the Dimbovitza for mezzo-soprano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (35) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London. See 8 April 1921.
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February 13, 1919: In memoriam: An Irish Elegy by Arnold Bax (35) for english horn, harp, and string quartet, is performed publicly for the first time, in London. See 10 March 1918.
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February 27, 1919: The Planets (without Venus and Neptune) by Gustav Holst (44) is given its first public performance, in Queen’s Hall, London while the composer is suffering from a fractured foot in Thessaloniki. On the same program is the premiere of the revised version of the Festival Overture for orchestra by Arnold Bax (35). See 29 September 1918.
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June 6, 1919: Winter Waters for piano by Arnold Bax (35) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London. Also premiered is Variations on Cadet Rousselle for voice and piano by Frank Bridge (40), John Ireland (39), Arnold Bax, and Eugene Goossens to traditional French words.
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June 23, 1919: The Enchanted Fiddle for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (35) to words of the composer is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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July 25, 1919: The orchestration of In a Vodka Shop by Arnold Bax (35) is performed for the first time, in the Alhambra Theatre, London.
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September 3, 1919: Scherzo for orchestra by Arnold Bax (35) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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November 24, 1919: Piano Sonata no.2 by Arnold Bax (36) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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March 15, 1920: Incidental music to Barrie’s play, The Truth about the Russian Dancers by Arnold Bax (36) is performed for the first time, in the London Coliseum. It is a great success.
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May 12, 1920: Quintet for piano and strings in g minor by Arnold Bax (36) is performed publicly for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. See 17 February 1917.
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June 15, 1920: Three works for piano by Arnold Bax (36) are performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London: The Slave Girl, What the Minstrel Told Us and Lullaby.
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October 29, 1920: The Garden of Fand, a symphonic poem by Arnold Bax (36), is performed for the first time, in Orchestra Hall, Chicago.
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November 18, 1920: November Woods for orchestra by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Free Trade Hall, Manchester.
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November 23, 1920: Symphonic Variations for piano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. It is very successful with the audience.
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November 29, 1920: A choreography for The Slave-Girl for piano by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in the London Coliseum. See 15 June 1920.
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February 24, 1921: A Quintet for harp and strings by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Hampstead Centre.
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April 8, 1921: The first five of the six movements of The Bard of the Dimbovitza for mezzo-soprano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (37) to words of Vacaresco, are performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. See 9 November 1918.
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April 12, 1921: The final version of the First Piano Sonata by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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May 26, 1921: Mediterranean for piano by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Steinway Hall, London. See 13 November 1922.
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July 4, 1921: Five Irish Songs for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (37) are performed for the first time, in the London Coliseum, the composer at the piano.
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October 20, 1921: Tintagel for orchestra by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Winter Gardens, Bournemouth.
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November 1, 1921: Summer Music for orchestra by Arnold Bax (37) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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November 17, 1921: Phantasy for viola and orchestra by Arnold Bax (38) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. It is first performed under the name Concerto for viola and orchestra.
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December 12, 1921: New works for orchestra are performed for the first time, in Queen's Hall, London:  Mai-Dun by John Ireland (42), Fanfare for a Hosting at Dawn by Arnold Bax (38), and Esquisse d’une fanfare, an overture to Act V of Romeo and Juliet.
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March 7, 1922: Of a Rose I Sing a Song for chorus, harp, cello, and double bass by Arnold Bax (38) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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April 25, 1922: Violin Sonata no.2 by Arnold Bax (38) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London, the composer at the piano.
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October 21, 1922: Now is the Time of Christymas, for male chorus, flute, and piano by Arnold Bax (38) is performed for the first time, in Blackpool.
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November 13, 1922: In a concert devoted entirely to his music, two works by Arnold Bax (39) are performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London: Mediterranean for orchestra and Mater Ora Filium for double choir. See 26 May 1921.
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November 17, 1922: Sonata in G for viola and piano by Arnold Bax (39) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London the composer at the keyboard.
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December 4, 1922: Symphony no.1 by Arnold Bax (39) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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February 9, 1923: A Piano Quartet by Arnold Bax (39) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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July 3, 1923: The Happy Forest for orchestra by Arnold Bax (39) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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September 5, 1923: To the Name Above Every Name for soprano, chorus, and orchestra by Arnold Bax (39) to words of Crashaw, is performed for the first time, in Worcester Cathedral.
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October 20, 1923: The Boar’s Head for male chorus by Arnold Bax (39) is performed for the first time, in the Old Opera House, Blackpool.
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November 2, 1923: This Worldes Joie, a motet by Arnold Bax (39) for chorus, is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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February 26, 1924: A Cello Sonata by Arnold Bax (40) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London. It is very successful.
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May 11, 1924: An Oboe Quintet by Arnold Bax (40) is performed for the first time, in the Hyde Park Hotel, London.
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May 21, 1925: St. Patrick’s Breastplate for chorus and orchestra by Arnold Bax (41) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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January 18, 1927: Romantic Overture for chamber orchestra by Arnold Bax (43) is performed for the first time, in New Chenil Galleries, King’s Road, London.
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March 15, 1927: String Quartet no.2 by Arnold Bax (43) is performed for the first time, in Grotrian Hall, London. Critics are mixed.
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June 10, 1927: Fantasy Sonata for viola and harp by Arnold Bax (43) is performed for the first time, in Grotrian Hall, London.
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November 18, 1927: Piano Sonata no.3 by Arnold Bax (44) is performed for the first time, in Liverpool.
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November 30, 1927: Two songs for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (44) are performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London: In the Morning to words of Houseman, and On the Bridge to words of Hardy.
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June 19, 1928: Two works for two pianos by Arnold Bax (44) are performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London: The Poisoned Fountain and The Devil That Tempted St. Anthony.
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December 1, 1928: Two of the Three Pieces for Small Orchestra by Arnold Bax (45) are performed for the first time, in Central Hall, Westminster.
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January 19, 1929: Sonata for flute and harp by Arnold Bax (45) is performed for the first time, privately, in Ipswich Central Library. See 28 January 1929.
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January 28, 1929: Sonata for flute and harp by Arnold Bax (45) is performed publicly for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London. See 19 January 1929.
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February 2, 1929: Hardanger for two pianos by Arnold Bax (45) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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February 4, 1929: Violin Sonata no.3 by Arnold Bax (45) is performed for the first time, in the Arts Theatre, London, the composer at the keyboard.
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June 6, 1929: Walsinghame, for tenor, chorus, and orchestra by Arnold Bax (45) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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October 3, 1929: The Viola Concerto of William Walton (27) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London. Paul Hindemith (33) is the soloist with the composer at the podium. Also premiered is the Overture, Elegy, and Rondo for orchestra by Arnold Bax (45).
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December 7, 1929: Legend for viola and piano by Arnold Bax (46) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London the composer at the piano.
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December 10, 1929: Sonata for two pianos by Arnold Bax (46) is performed for the first time, in the Music Club, Westminster.
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December 13, 1929: The Second Symphony of Arnold Bax (46) is performed for the first time, in Symphony Hall, Boston.
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March 14, 1930: Symphony no.3 by Arnold Bax (46) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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May 8, 1930: Fanfare for a Cheerful Occasion for brass and percussion by Arnold Bax (46) is performed for the first time, privately at the Musicians Benevolent Fund annual dinner in the Savoy Hotel, London. Also premiered is Hot Potatoes, a fanfare for brass and percussion by Ethel Smyth (72). See 26 May 1932.
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September 30, 1930: Nonet for flute, oboe, clarinet, harp, string quartet, and double bass by Arnold Bax (46) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, Bradford.
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November 6, 1930: Violin Sonata no.3 by Frederick Delius (68) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London. Arnold Bax (47) is at the piano.
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October 21, 1931: Valse for harp by Arnold Bax (47) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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November 14, 1931: Northern Ballad No. 1 for orchestra by Arnold Bax (48) is performed for the first time, in St. Andrew’s Hall, Glasgow.
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November 19, 1931: Overture to a Picaresque Comedy for orchestra by Arnold Bax (48) is performed for the first time, in Manchester. It is very successful.
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February 10, 1932: Winter Legends for piano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (48) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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March 16, 1932: Watching the Needleboats for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (48) to words of Joyce is performed for the first time, at the College of Nursing, London. Also premiered is Tutto e sciolto for voice and piano by John Ireland (52) to words of Joyce.
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March 16, 1932: Symphony no.4 by Arnold Bax (48) is performed for the first time, in Civic Auditorium, San Francisco.
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May 26, 1932: Fanfare for a Cheerful Occasion for brass and percussion by Arnold Bax (48) is performed publicly for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London. See 8 May 1930.
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July 2, 1932: Arnold Bax (48) arrives in Helsinki from Stockholm for five days in Finland. During this time, he visits Jean Sibelius (66) at Järvenpäa.
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October 3, 1933: Red Autumn for two pianos by Arnold Bax (49) is performed for the first time, in the College of Nursing Hall, London.
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October 21, 1933: Saga Fragment for piano, trumpet, two percussionists, and strings by Arnold Bax (49) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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January 15, 1934: Symphony no.5 by Arnold Bax (50) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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February 1, 1934: Piano Sonata no.4 by Arnold Bax (50) is performed for the first time, in Town Hall, New York.
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March 5, 1934: A Cello Concerto by Arnold Bax (50) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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March 8, 1934: Sonatina in D for cello and piano by Arnold Bax (50) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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April 12, 1934: The Tale the Pine-Trees Knew, a symphonic poem by Arnold Bax (50), is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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June 20, 1934: Oxford University confers an honorary DMus on Arnold Bax (50).
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March 1, 1935: A String Quintet by Arnold Bax (51) is performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London.
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June 17, 1935: A Clarinet Sonata by Arnold Bax (51) is performed for the first time, in Cowdray Hall, London.
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September 4, 1935: The Morning Watch for chorus and orchestra by Arnold Bax (51) to words of Vaughan is performed for the first time, in Worcester Cathedral.
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November 21, 1935: Symphony no.6 by Arnold Bax (52) is performed for the first time, in Queen’s Hall, London.
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October 13, 1936: Rogue’s Comedy, an overture for orchestra by Arnold Bax (52), is performed for the first time, in Central Hall, Liverpool.
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December 11, 1936: Three chamber works by Arnold Bax (53) are performed for the first time, in Aeolian Hall, London: Threnody and Scherzo for bassoon, harp, and string sextet, Concerto for flute, oboe, harp, and string quartet, and Octet for horn, piano, and string sextet. At 22:01 the concert is interrupted for the seven minute broadcast of King Edward announcing his abdication. Under this cloud, Bax’s works are introduced to the world.
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February 23, 1937: Overture to Adventure for orchestra by Arnold Bax (53) is performed for the first time, in Winter Gardens, Bournemouth.
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May 4, 1937: London Pageant for orchestra by Arnold Bax (53) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC.
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May 16, 1937: String Quartet no.3 by Arnold Bax (53) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC.
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June 11, 1937: Arnold Bax (53) is knighted by King George VI at Buckingham Palace.
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May 24, 1938: O Spiritual Pilgrim for soprano and chorus by Gustav Holst to words of Flecker is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London on the eve of the fourth anniversary of the composer’s death. Also premiered is the orchestration of Paean by Arnold Bax (54).
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June 9, 1939: Symphony no.7 by Arnold Bax (55) is performed for the first time, in Carnegie Hall as part of the New York World’s Fair.
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February 3, 1942: It is announced the Arnold Bax (58) has been appointed Master of the King’s Music.
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March 13, 1942: Having recently been appointed Master of the King’s Musick, Arnold Bax (57) travels to Buckingham Palace for an audience with King George and Queen Elizabeth.
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February 21, 1943: Fanfares for the Red Army for brass by William Walton (40) is performed for the first time, in the Royal Albert Hall, London. On the same program is the premiere of A Solemn Fanfare for brass by Arnold Bax (59).
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April 19, 1943: Salute to Sydney, a fanfare for brass by Arnold Bax (59), is performed for the first time, in a BBC Overseas broadcast.
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November 10, 1943: Legend-Sonata in f# minor for cello and piano by Arnold Bax (60) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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November 22, 1943: Violin Concerto by Arnold Bax (60) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC Home Service.
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February 23, 1944: To Russia for baritone, chorus, and orchestra by Arnold Bax (60) to words of Masefield, is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London.
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February 24, 1944: Work in Progress for orchestra by Arnold Bax (60) is performed for the first time, in a “new hall at a big factory in the London Suburbs.”
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October 28, 1944: A Legend for orchestra by Arnold Bax (60) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC Home Service, originating in The Guildhall, Cambridge.
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February 28, 1945: Five Fantasies on Polish Christmas Carols for children’s chorus and orchestra by Arnold Bax (61) to words translated by Sliwinski is performed professionally for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London. There has already been an amateur performance of this, but few details are known.
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December 23, 1945: O Dame Get Up and Bake your Pies for piano by Arnold Bax (62) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Third Programme.
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January 29, 1946: Incidental music for Clifford Bax’ play Golden Eagle by Arnold Bax (62) is performed for the first time, in Westminster Theatre, London.
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February 16, 1946: Northern Ballad no.2 for orchestra by Arnold Bax (62) is performed for the first time, in the Royal Albert Hall, London.
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March 21, 1946: Trio in B flat for violin, cello, and piano by Arnold Bax (62) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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November 11, 1946: Five Greek Folk Songs for chorus by Arnold Bax (63) is performed for the first time, in Cowdray Hall, Royal College of Nursing, London.
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November 13, 1946: Two works for chorus and organ by Arnold Bax (63) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC Third Programme: Te Deum and Nunc dimittis.
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February 7, 1947: Morning Song for piano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (63) is performed for the first time, in a recording session in the Abbey Road Studios, London. See 13 August 1947.
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July 8, 1947: The National University of Ireland confers an honorary DMus on Arnold Bax (63).
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August 13, 1947: Morning Song for piano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (63) is performed publicly for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London. See 7 February 1947.
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September 27, 1947: While traveling in Ireland, Arnold Bax (63) learns that his estranged wife Elsita has died. Bax does not alter his travel plans.
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November 20, 1947: Princess Elizabeth marries Lieutenant Philip Mountbatten, who becomes Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. Two Fanfares for the Royal Wedding for brass by Arnold Bax (64) are performed for the first time, at the event in Westminster Abbey, London.
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June 24, 1948: Oliver Twist, a film with music by Arnold Bax (64), is shown for the first time, in the Odeon Theatre, Marble Arch, London. When the film is shown in Berlin next February, the showing will be halted by Polish Jews who claim the character of Fagin is anti-Semitic. See 20 February 1949.
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March 2, 1949: Concertante for Three Wind Instruments by Arnold Bax (65) is performed for the first time, in Royal Albert Hall, London.
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October 25, 1949: Premier Maurice Duplessis of Quebec bans the film Oliver Twist (music by Arnold Bax (65)) because of protests that the character of Fagin is anti-Semitic.
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July 4, 1950: Concertante for piano left-hand and orchestra by Arnold Bax (66) is performed for the first time, in Cheltenham.
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May 18, 1951: Two Fanfares for “Show Business” for brass by Arnold Bax (67) are performed for the first time, over the airwaves of the BBC.
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April 29, 1953: Coronation March for orchestra by Arnold Bax (69) is performed for the first time, in a recording session in Kingsway Hall, London. See 2 June 1953.
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June 1, 1953: Four works for chorus by British composers are performed for the first time, in Royal Festival Hall, London, as part of the celebrations for the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II: Silence and Music by Ralph Vaughan Williams (80) to words of his wife Ursula Vaughan Williams, What is it Like to be Young and Fair by Arnold Bax (69) to words of Clifford Bax, The Hills by John Ireland (73) to words of Kirkup, and Michael Tippett’s (48) madrigal Dance, Clarion Air to words of Fry.
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June 2, 1953: Five new works by British composers are performed during the coronation ceremonies of Queen Elizabeth II in Westminster Abbey: Coronation Te Deum for chorus, orchestra, and organ, and Orb and Sceptre Coronation March for orchestra, both by William Walton (51); Coronation March for orchestra by Arnold Bax (69); The Old Hundredth Psalm Tune for chorus, unison chorus, orchestra, and organ and O Taste and See, a motet for chorus and organ to words of the Bible, both by Ralph Vaughan Williams (80). It is the first British coronation to be televised. See 18 March 1953.
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June 8, 1953: Gloriana op.53, an opera by Benjamin Britten (39) to words of Plomer after Strachey, is performed for the first time, at Covent Garden before Queen Elizabeth and other members of the royal family, knights, ministers, and foreign dignitaries. The Earl of Harewood calls it “one of the great disasters of operatic history.” Before the performance, William Walton’s (51) arrangement of God Save the Queen is performed for the first time. Walton is present, along with Ralph Vaughan Williams (80) and Arnold Bax (69).
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September 29, 1953: The Radio Eireann Symphony Orchestra devotes an evening to the music of Arnold Bax (69) in Phoenix Hall, Dublin in the presence of the composer. It is the last time he will hear his music.
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October 3, 1953: Between 21:30 and 22:00. Arnold Edward Trevor Bax dies suddenly at the home of Prof. Alyos Fleischmann, "Glen House" in Ballyvolane, Cork, Republic of Ireland, of coronary thrombosis and acute pulmonary aedema, aged 69 years, ten months, and 25 days.
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October 6, 1953: After a private funeral in Cork, the mortal remains of Arnold Bax are laid to rest in St. Finbarr’s Cemetery, Cork.
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October 15, 1955: An Arnold Bax (†2) memorial room is opened at Cork University by Ralph Vaughan Williams (83). It houses a number of effects donated by Harriet Cohen.
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January 31, 1961: Variations on the Name of Gabriel Fauré (†36) for harp and strings by Arnold Bax (†7) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Third Programme.
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May 31, 1961: Nympholept for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†7) is performed for the first time, at the Royal Academy of Music, 46 years after it was composed. See 14 February 1987.
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May 25, 1966: Rhapsodic Ballad for cello by Arnold Bax (†12) is performed for the first time, at the Cork Municipal School of Music.
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August 28, 1969: Legend for piano by Arnold Bax (†15) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3, 34 years after it was composed.
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March 5, 1970: Roscatha for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†16) is performed for the first time, in St. John’s, Smith Square.
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October 22, 1970: Cathaleen-ni-Hoolihan for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†17) is performed for the first time, at the Royal College of Music, London, 65 years after it was composed.
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December 8, 1970: Spring Fire for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†17) is performed for the first time, in Kensington, 57 years after it was composed.
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January 29, 1972: Cortège for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†18) is performed for the first time, in St. John’s, Smith Square, 47 years after it was composed.
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November 6, 1980: Aufblick, the first of the Nocturnes for soprano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (†27) to words of Dehmel, is performed for the first time, in a setting for voice and piano at the University of Keele.
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September 9, 1981: A scherzo, the only extant movement of a piano sonata composed in 1913 by Arnold Bax (†27), is heard for the first time, in a recording session in the EMI studios on Abbey Road, London.
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September 23, 1982: Prelude for a Solemn Occasion by Arnold Bax (†28) is performed for the first time, in New Broadcasting House, Manchester, 49 years after it was composed.
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February 3, 1983: Four works by Arnold Bax (†29) are performed for the first time at the British Music Information Centre, London during the centennial year of the composer’s birth: When We are Lost for voice and piano composed in 1905, A Lyke-Wake Dirge for voice and piano to anonymous 15th century Scottish words composed in 1908, Frühlingsregen for voice and piano to words of Rückert composed in 1910, and the third movement of a Symphony in F composed in 1907 in piano score only.
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April 21, 1983: Several works by Arnold Bax (†29) are performed for the first time, at the British Music Information Centre, London during the centennial of the composer’s birth: A fragment for violin and piano composed in 1897, the second movement of the Sonata no.1 for violin and piano composed in 1910, the second movement of a Piano Sonata in E flat, composed in 1937, Four Pieces for piano composed in 1947, and the Sonata in F for violin and piano composed in 1928. See 18 June 1914.
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June 25, 1983: Sinfonietta for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†29) is performed for the first time, in the BBC Concert Hall, Cardiff, 51 years after it was composed, during the centennial of the composer’s birth.
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October 7, 1983: Treue Liebe for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (†30) to anonymous words is performed for the first time, in a recording session in Christ’s Hospital, Horsham, Sussex, 73 years after it was composed, during the centennial of the composer’s birth.
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October 14, 1983: Works by Arnold Bax (†30) are performed for the first time, at the British Music Information Centre, London during the centennial year of the composer’s birth: The Fiddler of Dooney for voice and piano to words of Yeats 76 years after it was composed, Aspiration (1909) for voice and piano trio to words of Dehmel, O Mistress Mine (1916) for voice and piano trio or voice and string quartet, My Eyes for Beauty Pine (1920) for voice and string quartet, the extant fragments of the Sonata no.2 for viola and piano composed in 1934, and Two Songs for tenor and string quartet composed around 1921. These last may have been privately performed during the composer’s lifetime.
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October 16, 1983: Piano Sonata in E flat by Arnold Bax (†30) is performed for the first time, in Purcell Room, London, 62 years after it was composed, during the centennial year of the composer’s birth.
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November 18, 1983: Two of the Three Nocturnes for soprano and orchestra by Arnold Bax (†30) to words of Dehmel and Hartleben, are heard for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3, 72 years after they were composed, during the centennial year of the composer’s birth. The recording was made 23 September 1982.
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November 20, 1983: Glamour for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (†30) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3, 62 years after it was composed, during the centennial of the composer’s birth.
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November 23, 1983: 78 years after it was composed, From the Uplands to the Sea for voice and two pianos by Arnold Bax (†30) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3 during the centennial of the composer’s birth.
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December 16, 1983: Festival Overture by Arnold Bax (†30) is performed for the first time in its original two-piano version, over the airwaves of the BBC during the centennial of the composer’s birth. See 27 March 1912.
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February 14, 1987: Two works by Arnold Bax (†33) are heard for the first time, over the airwaves of BBC Radio 3: Nympholept for piano composed in 1912, and In the Night for piano composed in 1914. The recording was made 17 September 1986.
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April 11, 1988: Two works for high voice and orchestra by Arnold Bax (†34) are performed for the first time, in a recording session in All Saints’ Church, Tooting: Eternity to words of Herrick, and A Lyke-Wake to anonymous 15th century words. This is one of the Three Songs for high voice and orchestra.
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July 13, 1989: The second movement of a String Quartet in E by Arnold Bax (†35) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London 86 years after it was composed.
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October 9, 1992: Suite on the Name Gabriel Fauré for piano by Arnold Bax (†39) is performed for the first time, in Église Saint Pierre, Paris, 47 years after it was composed.
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January 5, 1994: Three Songs from the Norse for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (†40) is performed for the first time, privately, at the home of Susan and Aidan Woodcock, Stoke d’Abernon, Surrey. See 18 January 1994.
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January 18, 1994: Three Songs from the Norse for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (†40) is performed publicly for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London. See 5 January 1994.
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September 24, 1994: Portions of A Song of War and Victory for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†40) are performed for the first time, at Eton College. See 9 October 1997.
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May 18, 1996: Four works for voice and piano by Arnold Bax (†42) are performed for the first time, at Big School, Christ’s Hospital, Horsham: Wild Almond to words of Trench, composed in 1924, Viking-Battle-Song to words of Fiona Macleod, composed in 1905, The Splendour Falls on Castle Walls to words of Tennyson, composed in 1917, and A Leader to words of Russell, composed in 1916.
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October 9, 1997: A Song of War and Victory for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†44) is performed completely for the first time, at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana, 92 years after it was composed. See 24 September 1994.
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June 17, 1998: In memoriam, Pádraig Pearse for orchestra by Arnold Bax (†44) is performed for the first time, in Manchester 82 years after it was composed.