A CHRONOLOGICAL VIEW OF WESTERN MUSIC HISTORY IN THE CONTEXT OF WORLD EVENTS

Louis Andriessen

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June 6, 1939: Louis Andriessen is born in Utrecht, Kingdom of the Netherlands, the last of six children born to Hendrik Andriessen, a composer and organist, and Johanna Justine Anschütz, a professional pianist.
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December 14, 1959: Nocturnes for soprano and chamber orchestra by Louis Andriessen (20), to his own words, is performed for the first time, in The Hague, the Netherlands.
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February 23, 1961: Ittrospezione I for piano, four hands by Louis Andriessen (21) is performed for the first time, by the composer and Caecilia Andriessen.
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December 14, 1966: Four Dutch composers, including Louis Andriessen (27), hold an open debate over the failure of the Concertgebouw to program Dutch new music. The debate changes little.
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January 18, 1968: Anachronie I for orchestra by Louis Andriessen (28) is performed for the first time, in Rotterdam.
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May 30, 1968: A “Politiek-demonstratief experimenteel” (political-activist experimental) concert takes place in the Carré Theatre in Amsterdam. One of the organizers, Louis Andriessen (28), says the intention is to “underline clearly our political conviction and to declare our solidarity with the world revolution.” (Adlington, Composing, 195)
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June 29, 1969: Reconstruction, a music theatre by Louis Andriessen (30) and several other Dutch composers to words of Claus and Mulisch, is performed for the first time, in the Carré Theatre, Amsterdam.
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November 17, 1969: “Nutcrackers”, a group of four Dutch composers including Louis Andriessen (30), cause a disturbance during the performance of music by Johan Joachim Quantz (†196) at the Concertgebouw. The four blow whistles, shake rattles, and distribute leaflets to protest the lack of new music at the Concertgebouw. They also desire the appointment of Bruno Maderna (49) as conductor. At this, the conductor, Bernard Haitink, leaves the stage. Demonstrators jump on stage, hand out leaflets to the musicians, and use a megaphone to demand open discussion of their complaints. The audience reacts badly and eventually, the four are ejected by force and saved from physical harm by police.
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April 30, 1972: Parts of Perseverance for three trumpets, three saxophones, three trombones, and piano by Louis Andriessen (32) is performed for the first time, at a Young People for Vietnam demonstration in Amsterdam Woods. See 12 May 1972.
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May 12, 1972: Perseverance for three trumpets, three saxophones, three trombones, and piano by Louis Andriessen (32) is performed completely for the first time, in the Carré Theatre, Amsterdam. Beginning just before midnight, the music elicits vocal protests from some members of the audience. This is countered by supporters of the music who eventually win the day. This inspires the musicians to form the Perseverance Orchestra (Orkest De Volharding). See 30 April 1972.
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May 31, 1976: Hoketus for two groups of five instruments by Louis Andriessen (36) is performed for the first time, at the Royal Conservatory, The Hague, the Netherlands.
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November 3, 1976: Mattheus passie, a music theatre by Louis Andriessen (37) to words of Ferron, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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November 28, 1976: De Staat for two sopranos, two mezzo-sopranos, and chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (37) to words of Plato, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam. Critic Frits van der Waa will call it “the standard-bearer for contemporary Dutch music.” (Adlington, De Staat, 119)
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October 19, 1977: Orpheus, a music theatre by Louis Andriessen (38) to words of de Boer, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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June 17, 1979: Mausoleum for two singers and a large group of players by Louis Andriessen (40) to words of Bakunin and Arnould, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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May 29, 1980: George Sand, a music theatre by Louis Andriessen (40) to words of Meijer, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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June 1, 1981: Time, for women’s chorus and large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (41) to words of St. Augustine, is performed for the first time, at the Royal Conservatory, The Hague, the Netherlands.
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January 11, 1984: De Snelheid for large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (44) is performed for the first time, in Davies Hall, San Francisco.
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April 13, 1984: Doctor Nero, a music theatre by Louis Andriessen (44) to words of de Boer, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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June 9, 1985: De Stijl (De Materie Part III) for four voices, speaker, and large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (46) to words of Schoenmaekers and Domselaer-Middelkoop, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam. See 1 June 1989.
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October 21, 1986: Double Track, a dance by Louis Andriessen (47), is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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June 1, 1989: In the first complete performance of De Materie (Matter) by Louis Andriessen (49), Part II entitled Hadewijch, is performed for the first time, in the Muziektheater, Amsterdam.
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April 5, 1991: Facing Death for amplified string quartet by Louis Andriessen (51) is performed for the first time, at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
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April 24, 1991: De trap, a dance by Louis Andriessen (51) to a choreography by van Dillen, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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September 22, 1991: M is for Man, Music, Mozart, a film by Peter Greenaway with music by Louis Andriessen (52) is shown for the first time, in Utrecht, the Netherlands.
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November 3, 1991: Hout for tenor saxophone, marimba, guitar, and piano by Louis Andriessen (52) is performed for the first time, in Théâtre Frascati, Amsterdam.
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October 5, 1993: The overture to Louis Andriessen’s (54) unperformed opera Rosa is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam. See 2 November 1994.
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October 13, 1994: Several works are premiered in Merkin Hall, New York: Fragment for string quartet by Elliott Carter (85), Ned Rorem’s (70) Somewhere... for voice and piano the composer at the keyboard, Base for piano, left hand by Louis Andriessen (55), Quartet Movement in Memoriam DH by Robin Holloway (50), Spirit Quartet for string quartet and electronics by Tod Machover (40) and Music, minus one for string quartet and one other musician by Steven Mackey (38).
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November 2, 1994: ROSA,The Death of a Composer an opera by Louis Andriessen (55) to words of Greenaway, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam. See 5 October 1993.
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January 11, 1995: Zilver for flute, clarinet, marimba, vibraphone, piano, violin, and cello by Louis Andriessen (55) is performed for the first time, in Los Angeles.
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January 20, 1995: A Song of the Sea for one singer by Louis Andriessen (55) to words of Swarth, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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May 3, 1995: Odyssey, a dance by Louis Andriessen (55) to a choreography by Blankert, is performed for the first time, in Rotterdam.
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May 6, 1995: Odysseus’ Women a ballet for four women’s voices and synthesizer by Louis Andriessen (55) to words of Homer, is performed for the first time, in Rotterdam.
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August 29, 1995: Willibrord’s Arrival for carillon by Louis Andriessen (56) is performed for the first time, in the Cathedral Tower, Utrecht.
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November 8, 1995: To Pauline O for oboe by Louis Andriessen (56) is performed for the first time, in Rotterdam.
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June 7, 1996: The Last Day, part 1 of Trilogy of the Last Day, for child’s voice, four women’s voices, and large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (57) to words of Lucebert and anonymous, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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October 18, 1996: TAO, part 2 of Trilogy of the Last Day, for piano, four women’s voices, and chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (57) to words of Lao-Tzu and Takamura, is performed for the first time, in Donaueschingen.
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May 28, 1997: The Heralds for brass and percussion by Louis Andriessen (57) is performed for the first time, in The Hague, the Netherlands.
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June 12, 1997: The third part of Trilogy of the Last Day, called Dancing on the Bones, for six vocal soloists, children’s chorus, women’s chorus and large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (58) to his own words, is performed for the first time, in Cologne.
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April 1, 1998: Not an Anfang for piano by Louis Andriessen (58) is performed for the first time, in Korzo Theater, The Hague, the Netherlands.
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June 12, 1998: The First Lover for child soprano and organ by Louis Andriessen (59) to words of Tellegen, is performed for the first time, in Nieuwe Kirk, The Hague, the Netherlands.
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January 29, 1999: Odysseus’ Women for four women’s voices and chamber orchestra by Louis Andriessen (59) to words of Homer, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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June 2, 1999: A String Quartet by Louis Andriessen (59) is performed for the first time, in the Walloon Church, Amsterdam, 42 years after it was composed.
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December 1, 1999: Writing to Vermeer, an opera by Louis Andriessen (60) to words of Greenaway, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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February 22, 2000: Shopping List of a Poisoner for vocal soloist by Louis Andriessen (60) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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March 2, 2000: New works for solo piano are performed for the first time, in Weill Recital Hall, New York: Two Diversions for piano by Elliott Carter (91), On an Unwritten Letter by John Harbison (61), Image de Moreau by Louis Andriessen (60), Zwiesprache for piano by Wolfgang Rihm (47), and Dew-Fall-Drops by Tan Dun (42).
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June 1, 2000: The New Math(s) for voice, flute, violin, and marimba by Louis Andriessen (60) is performed for the first time, in Caetani Castle, Pontino, Italy.
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October 6, 2000: Inanna’s Descent for mezzo-soprano and eight players by Louis Andriessen (61) is performed for the first time, in Fara, Sabina, Italy.
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October 28, 2000: Woodpecker for percussion by Louis Andriessen (61) is performed for the first time, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
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July 27, 2001: Passeggiata in tram in America e ritorno for vocal soloist, amplified violin, and ten players by Louis Andriessen (62) to words of Campana, is performed for the first time, in Brisbane, Australia.
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June 12, 2002: Four new works are performed for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London: Au Quai for orchestra by Elliott Carter (93), Two Notes for Ollie op.74 for eleven players by Alexander Goehr (69), A Very Sharp Trumpet for trumpet by Louis Andriessen (61) and Bubo bubo for chamber ensemble by Magnus Lindberg (43).
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September 26, 2002: Garden of Eros for string quartet by Louis Andriessen (63) is performed for the first time, in Strasbourg.
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October 6, 2002: La Passione for vocal soloist, violin and chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (63) to words of Campana, is performed for the first time, in Queen Elizabeth Hall, London.
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November 13, 2002: Bells for Haarlem for vibraphone, piano, celesta, and synthesizer by Louis Andriessen (63) is performed for the first time, in Haarlem, the Netherlands.
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February 16, 2003: Garden of Eros for violin and piano by Louis Andriessen (63) is performed for the first time, in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
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April 24, 2003: Ruttmann for flute, three saxophones, horn, three trumpets, three trombones, piano, and double bass by Louis Andriessen (63) is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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May 13, 2003: Letter from Cathy for vocal soloist, violin, harp, percussion, piano, and double bass by Louis Andriessen (63) to words of Cathy Berberian, is performed for the first time, in Teatro Ariosto, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
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October 15, 2003: Inanna for vocal soloist, chorus, four saxophones, violin, and double bass by Louis Andriessen (64) to words of Hartley and Krispijn, is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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October 25, 2003: The Hague Hacking Scrap for two pianos by Louis Andriessen (64) is performed for the first time, in Leuven, Belgium.
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October 24, 2004: Racconto dall’inferno for voice and chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (65) to words of Dante is performed for the first time, in Klaus-von-Bismarck-Saal, Cologne.
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April 24, 2005: XENIA for violin by Louis Andriessen (65) is performed for the first time, at Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, England.
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June 1, 2005: De Opening for chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (65) is performed for the first time, in Amsterdam.
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September 17, 2005: Vermeer Pictures for orchestra by Louis Andriessen (66) and Clark Rundell, a suite from his opera Writing to Vermeer, is performed for the first time, in Dr. Anton Philipszaal, The Hague, the Netherlands. Also premiered is Time Release for percussion and orchestra by Steven Mackey (49).
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April 16, 2007: …miserere… for string quartet by Louis Andriessen (67) is performed for the first time, in Utrecht.
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November 18, 2007: The City of Dis or: The Ship of Fools for two vocal soloists, chorus, and chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (68) to words of Dante, is performed for the first time, in Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles.
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June 12, 2008: La Commedia, an opera by Louis Andriessen (69) to words of Dante, is performed for the first time, in Koninklijk Theater Carré, Amsterdam.
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January 16, 2009: The Hague Hacking for two pianos and chamber ensemble by Louis Andriessen (69) is performed for the first time, in Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles.
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February 8, 2009: Christiaan Andriessen’s view on the river Amstel for chamber ensemble and electronics by Louis Andriessen (69) is performed for the first time, in Apeldoorn, the Netherlands.
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March 22, 2010: Life for saxophone, percussion, piano, guitar, cello, and double bass by Louis Andriessen (70) is performed for the first time, in Teatro Elfo Puccini, Milan. The music accompanies a film by Marijke van Warmerdam.
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July 10, 2010: Anaïs Nin for amplified soprano, chamber ensemble, and film by Louis Andriessen (71) is performed for the first time, in Siena.
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September 5, 2011: Two new works are performed for the first time, in Teatro Dal Verme, Milan: In Broken Images for chamber orchestra by Harrison Birtwistle (77), and La Girò for amplified violin and large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (72).
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November 6, 2011: Monument for Graettinger by Louis Andriessen (72) is performed for the first time, in Nijmegen, the Netherlands.
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January 28, 2012: Shared memory for oboe and violin by Louis Andriessen (72) is performed for the first time, in Wigmore Hall, London.
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May 18, 2013: Rosa’s Horses for large ensemble by Louis Andriessen (73) and Clark Rundell is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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November 3, 2013: Mysteriën for orchestra by Louis Andriessen (74) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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May 24, 2014: Tapdance Concerto for percussion and ensemble by Louis Andriessen (74) is performed for the first time, in the Concertgebouw, Amsterdam.
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September 10, 2014: Two Way Ticket for piano by Louis Andriessen (75) is performed for the first time, over the airwaves of Slovak Radio originating in Bratislava.
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May 6, 2016: Theatre of the World, a stage work by Louis Andriessen (76) to words of Krausser, is performed for the first time, in Walt Disney Hall, Los Angeles.
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May 13, 2016: Signs and Symbols for winds by Louis Andriessen (76) is performed for the first time, in Chapin Hall, Williamsburg, Massachusetts.
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July 8, 2016: Ahania Weeping for chorus by Louis Andriessen (77) to words of Blake is performed for the first time, in the Presbyterian Church of Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia.
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March 11, 2017: Do Unto Me, God for organ by Louis Andriessen (77) is performed for the first time, at St. John's College, Cambridge.
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April 1, 2017: Works for piano are performed for the first time, at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York:  Rimsky or La Monte Young by Louis Andriessen (77), I Still Play by John Adams (70), and Move by Nico Muhly (35).
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September 16, 2017: De goddelijke routine for organ by Louis Andriessen (78) is performed for the first time, in Kathedrale Basiliek St. Bavo, Haarlem.